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The Proper Name of the SJ


zombywoof

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The Southern Jumbo was first built around 1942 with the banner head stock. It was a sunburst guitar. A natural version was available around 1954. The natural versions became the Country and Western around 1956. The Southern Jumbo became a square shouldered guitar in the early 60s a sunburst variation of the Country and Western.

 

 

When I say SJ I am talking about a Southern Jumbo. Some people refer to the J200 as an SJ. I am not sure how Gibson refers to the J200 now, they may call it an SJ200.

 

Here is a natural SJ with a Banner head. I bought this guitar locally. It has the newer through saddle belly up bridge not seen until around 1950. The pickguard looks like a color I have seen on 52s. So I don't know how it came to be. It is one super light guitar with a great deep tone. It is flanked by two maple J45s.

c62a93a62a.jpg

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A Super Jumbo is shaped a bit differently:

SJ2EANGH1.jpgRSSJVSNH.jpg

 

SUPER JUMBO..............................................SOUTHERN Jumbo

 

I have been guilty of confusing the issue by referring to the Super Jumbo series guitars, SJ-100 - SJ-300, as an "SJ" , which is technically correct. However some may confuse "SJ" with S.J. (Souther Jumbo)

 

Flat butt from sittin' on a fence, I 'spect. is a SOUTHERN Jumbo.

Round butt from not sittin' on a fence is a SUPER Jumbo

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A Super Jumbo is shaped a bit differently:

SJ2EANGH1.jpgRSSJVSNH.jpg

 

SUPER JUMBO..............................................SOUTHERN Jumbo

 

I have been guilty of confusing the issue by referring to the Super Jumbo series guitars' date=' SJ-100 - SJ-300, as an "SJ" , which is technically correct. However some may confuse "SJ" with S.J. (Souther Jumbo)

 

Flat butt from sittin' on a fence, I 'spect. is a SOUTHERN Jumbo.

Round butt from not sittin' on a fence is a SUPER Jumbo[/quote']

 

thanks, TK. i learn something here, everyday and most of it is useful, too! lol. i never noticed the flat butt. how would it affect tone? does it change projection?

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thanks' date=' TK. i learn something here, everyday and most of it is useful, too! lol. i never noticed the flat butt. how would it affect tone? does it change projection? [/quote']

 

That I couldn't help you with. I've never played either one. I played a SJ (Super Jumbo), with some pretty little darlin's name ascribed to it, but it was a down sized version to fit her petite frame. I wouldn't give you a plug nickle for it. My FT145SB, as shown in my AVATAR, sounds just as good..... and it's paid for.

 

The jury is still out, with me, on full sized versions of the SJs and Southern Jumbos

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That I couldn't help you with. I've never played either one. I played a SJ (Super Jumbo)' date=' with some pretty little darlin's name ascribed to it, but it was a down sized version to fit her petite frame. I wouldn't give you a plug nickle for it. My FT145SB, as shown in my AVATAR, sounds just as good..... and it's paid for.

 

The jury is still out, with me, on full sized versions of the SJs and Southern Jumbos

[/quote']

 

i think we need JK to weigh in here on the differences. round bottom VS flat bottom. (freddie mercury said flat bottom girls make the rockin' world go 'round - didnt he?)

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The confusion is not between the SJ-200 (I still call them that too) and the SJ.

 

Again, older Gibson catalogs list the SJ as the Southerner Jumbo. I have always heard it referred to as the Southern Jumbo. When Gibson issued the Woody Guthrie SJ, they called it the Southern Jumbo. I was just curious if Gibson had renamed the guitar or if the usage of Southern Jumbo - even if in error - has become so commonplace that is has replaced the guitar's real name.

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Thanks, Modac. Saved me from having to go check a reference. Just got in off the road and too beat to look. Woody briefly had an SJ around '44, time of the Roosevelt bandwagon tour. But the Woodster played a bunch of guitars: L00s, Martib 0017 & 00018, no names, so the idea of a Woody sig mdoel is a bit of a stretch. Marketing is a wonderful thing.

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According to Gibson's Fabulous Flatops...."....the Southerner Jumbo. ....it's original name was quickly shortened to the Southern Jumbo...."....so apparently it happened early in the evolution of the model.

 

Nope that dog won't hunt. Just found a 1962 Gibson catalog

 

gib62p35.jpg

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I think that the flat butt makes for a chunkier, more thumpy sound. The very round body of the SJ100-300 makes for a smoother sound, as if the vibrations roll around in the guitar before sneaking out of the soundhole. Square shoulder Gibsons seem to go one step chunkier, even. Hell, I love them all!

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Well Modac,

Gibson did get around to building a J45 Deluxe.

But it was not a Southern or Southerner Jumbo, but a square shoulder J45 of the Norlin era. Like my 72 model.

Also, for the life of me, I can't see anything deluxe...simple black pickguard, dot fingerboard markers, no sea shells??

Long live marketing.

Dale.

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there was recently an article in acoustic guitar magazine(I think it was that mag)about the southern jumbo and apparently it started out as southerner jumbo....something to the effect that custumers from the south were asking for a j45 with more "bling "to it and the southerner was born

pretty sure the magazine is still on the racks

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there was recently an article in acoustic guitar magazine(I think it was that mag)about the southern jumbo and apparently it started out as southerner jumbo....something to the effect that custumers from the south were asking for a j45 with more "bling "to it and the southerner was born

pretty sure the magazine is still on the racks

 

you are correct, sir. about 2 mos. ago.

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Well Modac' date='

Gibson did get around to building a J45 Deluxe.

But it was not a Southern or Southerner Jumbo, but a square shoulder J45 of the Norlin era. Like my 72 model.

Also, for the life of me, I can't see anything deluxe...simple black pickguard, dot fingerboard markers, no sea shells??

Long live marketing.

Dale.[/quote']

 

It's the deluxe model 'cause it says so right here:

 

"J45 Deluxe" <<<< Dee Luxx

 

I had a pick-um-up truck once. A Chevy C-10 Custom Deluxe. The only difference I could see between the Custom (the basicest model they had) was an AM and AM radio. You're right "Deluxe" is in the mind of the marketing department. Other than that the only acoutriments was four round tires, a bench seat, a heater, a glove box and "three on the tree."

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I had not your original post correctly with the Southerner Jumbo. I knew it was originally referred to as that, but thought the name had shortened. I have a 46, 47, 48 price list which calls it the Southerner Jumbo. I also have a 58 catalog which refers to the model as SJ and Southern Jumbo no Southerner Jumbo.

 

Interesting that Umanov used the Southerner Jumbo name.

 

Great observation.

 

Terry

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