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Chappy

New Epiphone Dot ES 335 needs setup..help!

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I just bought an Epiphone "Dot ES 335" a week ago. It sounds ok, but it needs help

in the tuning. Or intonation. It tunes up fine using my Tuner. And doing the

checking it 6th sting 5th fret to 5th string open, sounds fine. Etc.

 

It's down at the 12th fret or so that the tuning/intonation starts to lose it.

Never having tuned a Gibson using the adjustments at the bridge, I am not sure

how to start. As in, do I start w/the high E, Low E, or what? I don't like the

idea of using trial and error on this.

 

Can someone lead me to a site that describes this? Or tell me how to do it?

The neck is straight, so that isn't the problem.

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Not to be snarky, but I'd say take it to a good guitar tech. I'm a newb, but that's what I'd do. That way you know it is done right, and you can just play. Outside of that there are approximately a zillion websites that will advise you, right or wrong, on setting up your guitar.

okay, now I'm being snarky ;)

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Not to be snarky, but I'd say take it to a good guitar tech. I'm a newb, but that's what I'd do. That way you know it is done right, and you can just play. Outside of that there are approximately a zillion websites that will advise you, right or wrong, on setting up your guitar.

okay, now I'm being snarky ;)

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"there are approximately a zillion websites..."

 

Ok, can you give me a URL?

------

Aaron, I agree 100%. The problem is that the nearest music shop is over an hour away, and that is by car, which I don't have. Hence, my thinking of doing it myself. I started from scratch back in 1987 and opened a bicycle shop. To do so, I had to be the owner, accountant, salesman, mechanic, etc. Once I got over my fear of taking things apart, I was able to not only do that, by reassemble them, fixed. My thought being is that there are a lot less parts to a guitar than a bike.

 

I just need to know where to start. My guess is with the string that is at the right height and closest to "in tone".

Since mine all seem to be set at the correct height, all I need find is the string that when played open and at the 12th fret, sound in tone w/each other and start there.

 

Anyone who knows what I mean and can do/has done this, please let me know.

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=========================

"there are approximately a zillion websites..."

 

Ok, can you give me a URL?

 

 

When I was attempting to set up my SG after I bought it, I YouTubed "Gibson Setup" and various other terms, and found a plethora of videos. Some were overly simplistic, and others quite technical. You can probably find one that suits your skill level and knowledge level after wading through a few of them.

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I recently got a G-400 Faded Series and here's what I did to get my guitar to stay in tune. 1. I use 9s, so I had to reset the intonation on the bridge saddles. If you know how to intonate a guitar, that shouldn't be any problem. If not then here's what you do. Hit a open string on the one you want to intonate, then hit the 12th fret. If the note is sharp or flat, then adjust the bridge saddle until it's the same as the open note you're playing.

 

2. I adjusted the string height according to Gibson's standards which are as follows,

12th fret Bass side 5/64-12th fret Treble side 3/64 This is from the bottom of the fret to the top of the string.

 

3. Adjust your tailpiece accordingly. If you're using wound strings, then give the tailpiece 3 full turns on the Bass side and 2 full turns on the Treble side.

 

4. I'm assuming that your guitar has Grover tuners, so only use about 3 winds per peg. That should be enough to keep it in tune.

 

Once I did all of that, my guitar was fully intonated and now stays in perfect tune. Hope this info helps.

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If you fancy doing the job yourself it's generally a case of comparing the fretted string note with the pure 'harmonic' note over the 12th fret. The bridge saddles can lengthen or shorten each string by a few mm's...if the fretted note is higher than the harmonic note, lengthen the string by screwing the saddle adjuster out...if the fretted note is lower than the harmonic note, shorten the string by screwing the saddle adjuster in. Use an electronic tuner for all comparisons as the ear can get confused and 'never satisfied' by what it hears naturally. Once the intonation is adjusted it's time to practice correct facial expressions for 'high fret' playing...

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