Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Gilliangirl

String squeak

Recommended Posts

Yes, I was one of the ones on the old forum who would always pipe up and say how much I like string squeak. And I truly did. But, now with amplification, that string squeak is louder, and it's not like-able anymore! I've tried Fast Fret, which seemed to help a wee bit, but does this mean I'll have to be more careful when plugged in? Jeez, it takes all the strength I have just to be a crappy player!

 

Anyone found any answers to the string squeak dilemma (other than improving my skills :D )?

 

And to those of you inclined to say 'I told ya so' when I argued about the values of string squeak..... [-X :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elixirs = no more string noise.

 

"Nanos" for those just getting their feet wet, "Polywebs" for the full strength. The wound strings (polys) start to shed when they're requiring

replacement. That's the only way you'll know. Available in 80/20 bronze & custom gauges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I've found short of improving my technique to reduce string squeek ;) is using Elixir strings.

 

That's exactly what I was gonna say!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I was one of the ones on the old forum who would always pipe up and say how much I like string squeak. And I truly did. But, now with amplification, that string squeak is louder, and it's not like-able anymore! I've tried Fast Fret, which seemed to help a wee bit, but does this mean I'll have to be more careful when plugged in? Jeez, it takes all the strength I have just to be a crappy player!

 

Anyone found any answers to the string squeak dilemma (other than improving my skills :D )?

 

And to those of you inclined to say 'I told ya so' when I argued about the values of string squeak..... [-X :D

 

I use D'Addario Chrome Flat 12s on my acoustic AND electrics. Perhaps not as bright on acoustic but I love the feel and mellow tone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On those occasions when I want "quiet" string noise, I use D'Addario XL half-rounds (Jazz lights 12-52) - on my acoustics. They're a bit brighter than the flats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Half rounds, flat rounds, coated strings, lighter touch for chording.....all these will help.....you lose some quality of sound with the flatwounds unless you are recording and can mix properly. Good luck...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will be worse when you have brand new strings. Once you've played them in it should not be so bad. I like a bit of natural string squeak. The problem with amplified acoustics is that what the squeak sounds like is dependent upon which pickup you are using. Some make it sounds horrific, with others it is much more natural.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elixirs help.

 

I've used cheap $1.. probably $1.19 by now, shoe shine sponges for touching up your shoes before... whatever shiny shoes are good for. A couple light swipes and your good to go. I think these sponges have silicone in them. Not sure what the Fast Fret has in it. Yes the silicone might make it difficult to re-finish the guit tar, but I'm not likely to refinsh any guit tar in my life time, so.. eh?

 

If you absolutely must get rid of the the squeak, get flat wound strings. I think juststrings-dot-com carries them for acoustics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My solution, (and to avoid using coated strings, because of the feel) ... Newtone double-round round core strings. Great tone, and due to the extra winding, almost no noise. They fret easier than hex-core strings, as well, which is something to consider if hand strength is an issue. Mind you, the greater mass of the wound strings makes these strings very warm after they settle, but they also have a nice, clear bass, which can take the thump right out of a guitar. Some like that, some don't.

 

Flinx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could see where this might matter in a studio situation...but live...I dunno...I'd just practice more or change your amp settings so that it's not so bright and annoying...and practice more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My solution, (and to avoid using coated strings, because of the feel) ... Newtone double-round round core strings. Great tone, and due to the extra winding, almost no noise. They fret easier than hex-core strings, as well, which is something to consider if hand strength is an issue. Mind you, the greater mass of the wound strings makes these strings very warm after they settle, but they also have a nice, clear bass, which can take the thump right out of a guitar. Some like that, some don't.

 

Flinx

+1, the newtone double-wounds reduce string noise quite a bit, although not totally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1, the newtone double-wounds reduce string noise quite a bit, although not totally.

 

True. I don't think it's possible to completely eliminate string squeak without a coating. And maybe not even then, unless you wash your hands thoroughly before playing, to soften the calluses.

 

My second suggestion, (although it might require a different outlook or an alternative open-minded approach towards the tonal palette of a particular guitar), D'Aquisto Acoustic Guitar Nickel Round Wound Tony Rice Custom strings. Now mind you, although some guitars may not react well to nickle strings and/or some players simply don't like the sound, this doesn't mean that nickle strings should be automatically written off, even if the guitar in question isn't made of mahogany or maple. Or that only smaller bodied guitars sound good with them, and only if you wish to have a vintage, bluesy tone.

 

True non-plated nickle strings are very quiet, unusually so, and can produce a surprisingly beautiful sound with a guitar that has a lightly braced top, made of stiff wood, like red spruce. Even a big ole' rosewood dread can create notes of unusual resonance and warmth, if the guitar is well-made. Perhaps the best string I've felt and heard for finger style play with a larger guitar. Nickle strings are easy to fret and work well with styles that require hammer-ons, bends, and vibrato. Picking needs slightly more digging in while going through the strings for a fuller sound, but that's not necessarily always a bad thing, and the result can be worth it. A heavier hand might benefit from the even tone across the neck, and the lessening of boomy dominance in the bass.

 

Flinx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...