Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

How are your nuts????


onewilyfool

Recommended Posts

I can only comment on the earvana - they look wierd, they may help in certain very specific intonation situations. But - there is often another solution, and you need VERY good ears to hear the difference.

 

However - if a player insists on a certain string set-up, and has the action relatively high, they could possibly improve things. I have played two guitars with earvana funny-nuts. Both intonated well - but I never heard them BEFORE the addition of the nut.

 

I can see certain situations where they might actually make things worse - like a well set up guitar with a compensated bridge and the right strings for THAT compensation just might get WORSE if you add further correction at the nut.

 

I don't know..... but no squirels were hurt in the making of this posting.

Can I have my free earvana sample now please, Mr.Earvana?eusa_whistle.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to try some of this stuff. I'm having my guitars set up by Bill Pupplett at the end of next month, who I know deals with staggered nuts, so if he could improve my intonation I'd be a very happy man :-) I shall report back...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KSdaddy.....we ARE talking about guitars right? I once walked the entire Appalacian Trail in Maine one summer in my youth. We got rain every day, and the humidity was stifling....lol....beautiful country though, lots of river crossings, belive me my nuts had to deal with a lot of humidity....lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to go off topic and talk about compensation instead of nuts, though I hear some nuts do get good compensation. . .

 

I had this done to a guitar that had intonation issues. It was done differently - actually a piece of fret wire was used to straighten out the intonation on the B string - and it worked rather well. Normally, cosmetics are not a big issue for me, but in this case that little piece of raised fret wire looked like damage and I couldn't get used to looking at it.

 

I agree with the concept that we want to intonate our guitars as well as possible, but the aesthetic impact of all these ups and downs on a line that is normally straight, and for the minor difference it provides for intonation - and worse still the fact that this intonation will later change with any neck movement like a truss rod adjustment - I just don't like it and it seems too picky-perfect for what I imagine to be the average player.

 

I prefer to have compensation reined in from the saddle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
Sorry to go off topic and talk about compensation instead of nuts' date=' though I hear some nuts do get good compensation. . .

 

I had this done to a guitar that had intonation issues. It was done differently - actually a piece of fret wire was used to straighten out the intonation on the B string - and it worked rather well. Normally, cosmetics are not a big issue for me, but in this case that little piece of raised fret wire looked like damage and I couldn't get used to looking at it.

 

I agree with the concept that we want to intonate our guitars as well as possible, but the aesthetic impact of all these ups and downs on a line that is normally straight, and for the minor difference it provides for intonation - and worse still the fact that this intonation will later change with any neck movement like a truss rod adjustment - I just don't like it and it seems too picky-perfect for what I imagine to be the average player.

 

I prefer to have compensation reined in from the saddle.[/quote']

 

I agree that for the average player .....unless it is noticeable ....just play your guitar and make some fun music!

 

I guess out of curiosity and because there are much more knowledgeable folks here.....

 

Would there be a reason to compensate a guitar at the nut rather than at the saddle ....ie. the compensation happens closer to the frets which gives some sort of benefit? or is the compensation at the saddle more efficient because the saddle and the fretted note are the two points of contact with the guitar creating the pitch. It would seem that fretting the notes would cut out the compensated nut and it would not be as effective.

 

OK ...smart guys ....the BALLS in your court ! :-k Don't give me the sack! #-o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...