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morty

Gibson les paul 50s tribute- Reviews

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hey guys, could the people what have this guitar give some reviews, how it plays, how well it is setup, neck speed, quality of guitar, is it one of the best recent gibson guitars, etc, just give an overall review

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The more I play it, the more I like it. I swapped strings almost immediately, the stock strings felt like crap to me and the guitar was less than a month old. The P90's growl, snarl and chime. The guitar is VERY resonant and a pleasure to hold and play compared to some other LP types I have. I was concerned the chambered body would take away some of that "LP warmth" but it doesn't at all.

I'm lucky enough to not have any issues with the switch, the pots work very well, I can hear a roll off in both volume and tone in the slightest of adjustments. If I have 1 beef, it's that the neck has a sticky feeling to it. Normally I take a green scotchbrite pad to the back of the neck, this gets it nice and smooth, but I have a feeling the sticky feeling is going to go away with more playing.

It sounds very nice through my Blues Jr, and I got a splitter for my SCXD, so it's 2x10 (1 Ragin Cajun and 1 Celestion G10 Vintage) and it booms through that one.

The fretboard feels great, very smooth and nice big frets.

All in all, I am VERY, VERY happy with this guitar. Granted, I do not own any other Gibson guitar, and this was the first LP I could afford. I had some high expectations and it met them. [thumbup]

 

Hope this helps some.

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As mentioned numerous other places, I am happy with mine too. Great sound from the P90s, especially with pure nickel strings, Set-up was surprisngly good. Quality all around was fine, haven't had any issues. I don't get or like the 'worn' look, but luckily mine was pretty subtle - I'd rather there was no 'wear' though. The finish is kind of thin especially on the neck. I am very glad for the old school electronics - I will always try avoiding Gibsons with PCBs at all costs.

 

It is certainly not the best guitar Gibson has produced recently, and some are/seem pretty 'iffy' actually. There are plenty I would rather have, but none would go for $700.

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I've had a few minor problems with the action very high, and the switch crackling like a 10 year old switch, but in all, I really love it. The weight of it still with the sound of it, still amazes me.

For the price, I am not complaining at all. Love it.msp_thumbup.gif

I would buy it all over again, knowing everything I currently know!msp_smile.gif

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I have to say that I love my Cherry Burst. The back looks like fire engine red, but the top looks fantastic. Good piece of maple for the top with nice grain. Typical bookmatch, and very well done. The back is difficult to tell if it is more than one piece, but I'm guessing it's at least 2 pieces.

My switch crackled bad when I first played it, but it has settled in and works fine now (strange!!).

Frets are well done. Rosewood is nicely striated (striped). Inlays on fretboard are fine.

 

It is the lightest LP I've ever played. I've owned 2 others and traded 'em off due to weight...this one's a keeper!

The body is resonant and the P-90's sound awesome. I had an SG Classic with P-90's but I traded it off because I felt that the bridge pup sounded harsh, sharp and brittle. NOT so with this bridge pup.

 

The gig bag is the worst piece o' crap I've ever owned.

 

All in all...WELL worth the paltry $849 I paid for it. [thumbup] If I had the cash, I'd definately buy a second to throw in a closet for a few years to sell later!

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I have to say that I love my Cherry Burst. The back looks like fire engine red, but the top looks fantastic. Good piece of maple for the top with nice grain. Typical bookmatch, and very well done. The back is difficult to tell if it is more than one piece, but I'm guessing it's at least 2 pieces.

My switch crackled bad when I first played it, but it has settled in and works fine now (strange!!).

Frets are well done. Rosewood is nicely striated (striped). Inlays on fretboard are fine.

 

It is the lightest LP I've ever played. I've owned 2 others and traded 'em off due to weight...this one's a keeper!

The body is resonant and the P-90's sound awesome. I had an SG Classic with P-90's but I traded it off because I felt that the bridge pup sounded harsh, sharp and brittle. NOT so with this bridge pup.

 

The gig bag is the worst piece o' crap I've ever owned.

 

All in all...WELL worth the paltry $849 I paid for it. [thumbup] If I had the cash, I'd definately buy a second to throw in a closet for a few years to sell later!

 

Yeah, in my euphoria over the guitars themselves, I neglected to mention the gig bags in my previous posts. Curiously, the GT I picked up at Sam Ash came with a different style bag than the ebony that I got from M123. The bag with the GT was pretty lame, and didn't even seem to fit the guitar which wasn't a big deal as the GT moved quickly into a case that had been occupied by a Melody Maker. The gig bag that came with the ebony was slightly better, as gig bags go, but was relegated to a closet with the ebony moving into a real case. The poor Melody Maker is resting in the gig bag that came with the GT for now, though I should probably find better accommodations for it.

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Very impressed with my 50's studio. Plays great, low action, love p-90s. Except for the crap gig bag it's all good. Just plan to buy a real case.

 

I gotta say the fretwork on this guitar is really great. Better than I expected for the price.

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Very impressed with my 50's studio. Plays great, low action, love p-90s. Except for the crap gig bag it's all good. Just plan to buy a real case.

 

I gotta say the fretwork on this guitar is really great. Better than I expected for the price.

 

I must say, I think just about all of us are either crowding out another guitar to use that case, or buying another hard case just for it.cool.gif

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I stripped down my GT and checked everything out and restrung and setup her up to my tastes with 10's. My GT has a real 50's neck (thick side), I tried another that had a thinner neck. The neck is straight but doesn't have much negative relief, if I loosen the truss rod completely the neck doesn't bow much, hope this doesn't become an issue, the frets are all nice a little rounded than flat a few of the edges need a little file'n, the rosewood is smooth, . The intonation is spot on after the setup and all the saddles have plenty of room for adjustments. I can't get the strings as low as some of my other guitars but where she is set the guitar is very playable. The P90 on mine are noisy, I have another 2007 P90 Les Paul Special DC which is a solid slab of mahogany no maple cap and she is not as noisy. I think the chambering adds to the noisy factor. The P90 don't seem to be a set of one normal wound and one reversed wound so when you play both they quite down, both are noisy. They also are both the same resistance and seem like the same pickup and not a neck or bridge only. The pots, caps and switch all seem very good, the pots work well and the caps sound nice, the plastic jack plate is a joke, will replace with a chrome one in time. The finish on mine is very nice the neck is smooth and not sticky, the back is 4 pieces, the top looks to be one piece but can't really tell with the painted gold top, looked but can't find a seem on the edge/fax binding. All in all I'm very happy with the guitar's quality and playability, I did switch out the P90's for some mini's

 

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This is a good overview. For those of us who are waiting until the end of September or even longer for one of these Tributes this thread has been a great source of information on what to look for. This will have to be a stellar player before I start doing mods, if in fact I do actually take it home. I'm having doubts.

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thanks for reviews, i don't under stand why they are 3-4 pieces bodys, are most studios more than a one piece body could you take a pic of how low the strings will go to the fretboard without fret buzz

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Actually that's 2-4 piece bodies. My HB is a 2 piece, and I've heard of others. But I think the number of pieces the body blank is cut from is a non- issue. I certainly can't pin any performance issue to that fact. (No, I would not be happy with that if it were not a budget guitar, but it is).

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Actually that's 2-4 piece bodies. My HB is a 2 piece, and I've heard of others. But I think the number of pieces the body blank is cut from is a non- issue. I certainly can't pin any performance issue to that fact. (No, I would not be happy with that if it were not a budget guitar, but it is).

 

Perhaps, the tributes before the flood were made with less pieces than those made after the flood. Gibson maybe using what ever mahogany wood they had recovered. Mine is also a 4 piece back.

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There is at least one post flood two piece I've seen written up. And as to recovered wood, I doubt it. Gibson is very particular about the wood they use, how it's stored etc. In case you've missed it, their wood storage warehouse was unaffected by the flood.

 

It's far more likely that what is being used is pieces of Mahogany that were cut offs from other blanks being made. If you've got a piece that is 3 or 5 inches wide for example, but perfectly good and long enough to make an LP body, why not join it with another (or two etc.) and make a body for one of your lower line guitars. Especially when it doesn't seem to create any strength or tonal issues. Using what may have otherwise become wasted helps cut the cost of such a guitar, which might help to enable it to be sold to the end user for say, $849 instead of 2K. Just sayin'....

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There is at least one post flood two piece I've seen written up. And as to recovered wood, I doubt it. Gibson is very particular about the wood they use, how it's stored etc. In case you've missed it, their wood storage warehouse was unaffected by the flood.

 

It's far more likely that what is being used is pieces of Mahogany that were cut offs from other blanks being made. If you've got a piece that is 3 or 5 inches wide for example, but perfectly good and long enough to make an LP body, why not join it with another (or two etc.) and make a body for one of your lower line guitars. Especially when it doesn't seem to create any strength or tonal issues. Using what may have otherwise become wasted helps cut the cost of such a guitar, which might help to enable it to be sold to the end user for say, $849 instead of 2K. Just sayin'....

 

Yep, my post flood GT is a 2 piece body

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thanks for reviews, i don't under stand why they are 3-4 pieces bodys, are most studios more than a one piece body could you take a pic of how low the strings will go to the fretboard without fret buzz

 

I'm still not getting my low e to stop buzzing yet.

I know it's very easily possibly done, but I'm trying to keep my strings low as poss. and doing more playing then adjusting right now.

But, that said, personally, I think, compared to other guitars I use regularly, the '50's tribute is being more finicky in getting it just right.

I admit I am not the greatest at setting these up perfectly, but the low e seems high enough to not buzz.

Maybe I'll just put 11 strings in it that would probably help the issue, don't ya think guys?msp_huh.gif

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I'm still not getting my low e to stop buzzing yet.

I know it's very easily possibly done, but I'm trying to keep my strings low as poss. and doing more playing then adjusting right now.

But, that said, personally, I think, compared to other guitars I use regularly, the '50's tribute is being more finicky in getting it just right.

I admit I am not the greatest at setting these up perfectly, but the low e seems high enough to not buzz.

Maybe I'll just put 11 strings in it that would probably help the issue, don't ya think guys?msp_huh.gif

Is it buzzing on the low frets or the higher ones? Sometimes the trussrod needs adjustment, especially with other string gauges than the guitar came with. But then again, maybe you just trying to set the action too low.

 

Ok, if the low frets (fret psition, not high or low strings!) buzz, then the neck is too straight and you have to loosen the trussrod. If only the high frets buzz then the neck has too much bow and you have to straighten the neck. If you take 0.11er string the string tension increases, so you get more bow into the neck, and maybe that is exactly the amount of bow you need to get rid of the buzz, but I wouldn't count on it. It is definately possible to adjust a guitar to different string gauges, but the whole thing is about very little differences, so maybe it is a good idea to leave it to somebody else. And keep in mind, sometimes a little more action gives you a better tone and sustain while still having good playability.

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It's the LOW E string. I don't think i'll mess around with the rod myself, even if's just a little turn of the nut, i'm just not quite sure.

I have adjusted my Epiphones and others without any issues, i'm just worried if the nut is already near the ending of the adjustment.

Plain english, I'm not that comfortable with a more expensive guitar, the others were less to lose if you get my drift.msp_unsure.gif

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It really isn't a big deal at all - you turn the nut 1/8 of a turn at a time - very hard to screw it up that way, and they are usually pretty responsive to even slight changes. You can see exactly what you are doing and can mark the face of the nut at your starting point. I would certainly do that instead of raising gauge unless you really want thicker strings...that is what truss rods are for!

 

And sounds like you are loosening the nut, so even if you go too far it will just - be loose - you can just tighten it back up until you feel tension on it. At THAT point you could go heavier strings to get more relief (my Gretsch was like that) but never had an issue on a Gibson. And haven't had one that didn't need a tweak after being at the house for a few days.

 

Get yourself a way of measuring the gap per specs (.010-.012" gap at 6th Fret, w/low E fretted at the 1st & 12th fret) and go for it.

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Yeah, in my euphoria over the guitars themselves, I neglected to mention the gig bags in my previous posts. Curiously, the GT I picked up at Sam Ash came with a different style bag than the ebony that I got from M123. The bag with the GT was pretty lame, and didn't even seem to fit the guitar which wasn't a big deal as the GT moved quickly into a case that had been occupied by a Melody Maker. The gig bag that came with the ebony was slightly better, as gig bags go, but was relegated to a closet with the ebony moving into a real case. The poor Melody Maker is resting in the gig bag that came with the GT for now, though I should probably find better accommodations for it.

 

 

None of your guitar is out?

You' always have to open something to play your guitar at home?

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None of your guitar is out?

You' always have to open something to play your guitar at home?

 

Yeah, we've got a young dog around the house who still seems a bit too curious about my guitars, so I feel a little more comfortable with them tucked safely away. It's a bit of a pain, but it gives me some peace of mind and removes some sources of potential temptation from the pup. (He finds plenty of other opportunities for mischief).

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Yeah, we've got a young dog around the house who still seems a bit too curious about my guitars, so I feel a little more comfortable with them tucked safely away. It's a bit of a pain, but it gives me some peace of mind and removes some sources of potential temptation from the pup. (He finds plenty of other opportunities for mischief).

 

lol, gotta do the same thing with my guitars....When you got a 100 lb malamute running around, and not to mention the other dogs. [thumbup]

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Yeah, we've got a young dog around the house who still seems a bit too curious about my guitars, so I feel a little more comfortable with them tucked safely away. It's a bit of a pain, but it gives me some peace of mind and removes some sources of potential temptation from the pup. (He finds plenty of other opportunities for mischief).

Two words for that... Wall hanger! I used to have 4 in the main room of the last house I owned. Very convenient, and I found I played more having them in sight and readily available. Currently, I am renting with a roommate, but have my own part of the house. No wall hangers, but a couple of single stands and a 5 guitar rack (ProLine). I usually keep 3-5 out at any one time, nearly always at least one. Still find I play more that way (even if it's to pick one up and mess around unplugged while watching the tube).

 

 

lol, gotta do the same thing with my guitars....When you got a 100 lb malamute running around, and not to mention the other dogs. [thumbup]

131 Lb. Bernese Mountain Dog (my roomate's, but also my buddy). He and the 50 lb. Husky (also the roommate's) like to come to my part of the house and hang with me sometimes, and even curl up near where I sit, close proximity to the guitars. So far, no issues [-o< but I've had to move the big guy's paws a few times when he stretched out and was bumping my amps... [scared]

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