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morty

music notation

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hey guys, are you able to read music notation, or just use tab? is there any books that help with reading music notation or is it a simple as e f g a b c d e f [flapper] [flapper]

 

thanks!

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I find both valuable for guitar...notation allows you to communicate with other musicians too. The best book for guitarists learning notation from scratch is 'Alfred's Basic Guitar Method'.

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I find both valuable for guitar...notation allows you to communicate with other musicians too. The best book for guitarists learning notation from scratch is 'Alfred's Basic Guitar Method'.

 

+1. Being able to read music properly opens you up to lots of different things, no matter how good your ear is. For classical playing, it's almost essential.

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I read music. It's a bit more complicated than - e f g a b c d e f - the notes of the treble clef staff. There's the signature area with the clef, key and time signatures. Then there's the beat value of the notes, symbols, all those Italian words used for directions, and lots of other stuff. I'm glad I learned it when I was young. I don't think I'd have the patience for it now. Tablature is much easier, but it contains no info on the timing and note values - so if you don't know the song to start with, tablature isn't going to help you completely learn it.

 

Versatile makes a good point - notation allows you to communicate with other musicians too.

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Standard notation all the way.

 

You can't easily transcribe to TAB without a guitar in your hand, you can't easily compose to TAB without a guitar in your hand. You can't easily look at a TAB sheet and hear what it sounds like in your head.

 

Standard notation has none of the above issues. Reading it on guitar is easy if you think in terms of scale degrees, and not note letters.

 

That said, TAB has it's pros, especially while learning the physical act of playing guitar. It's not ambiguous like standard notation, where you have to consider all fingering possibilities before you can finalize the position to play the tune in. However, notation ambiguity and the necessary problem solving approach will teach you more about the fretboard than you could dream of.

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+1. Being able to read music properly opens you up to lots of different things, no matter how good your ear is. For classical playing, it's almost essential.

 

And if your ear is no good, reading notation will train your ear automatically.

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`

 

 

I can't read "string chart" tab. They just make no sense

for translating the visible to the audible.

 

Lead sheets [changes and lyrics] are very useful to me

since I play bass. I can't sight read at tempo, or even at

half tempo LOL ... I only read standard notation to look

at certain specific licks which are important to a tune's

musical self-identity.

 

It may take me a whole minute to read and understand

four or eight measures, but it does, unambiguously, tell

me EVERYTHING about that lick. Reading at my crude

level requires no formal lessons, and is the only source

of clear, unambiguous answers in page form. Just do it !

 

 

 

`

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