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dem00n

A guitar made out of just one piece of wood?

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I remeber my guitar teacher telling me his boss owns one guitar that was made from just one piece of wood...the whole guitar minus the rosewood on the neck.

Is this possible, how ****ing hard could it be?

 

And how much??/

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The wood alone would be really expensive and it would be very wasteful. Think of a big rectangle of wood. And then all the wood you have to cut off to make it guitar shaped. Good wood is expensive and a piece that size..

 

I've thought about it though it would be cool.

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The wood alone would be really expensive and it would be very wasteful. Think of a big rectangle of wood. And then all the wood you have to cut off to make it guitar shaped. Good wood is expensive and a piece that size..

 

I've thought about it though it would be cool.

Yeah but for a person to handle that, do you think they would really care about the rest of the wood?

I mean you can use the rest for TRC or a pickguard, etc.

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The Firebird with it's through neck is on similar lines.

Yeah but its just the neck and body and two wings added on the body, correct?

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Yeah but for a person to handle that, do you think they would really care about the rest of the wood?

I mean you can use the rest for TRC or a pickguard, etc.

 

It certainly would not cost as much as a '50s Tribute made from 11 pieces of wood...

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Yeah but its just the neck and body and two wings added on the body, correct?

Yes of course....my thought is that what makes a good neck doesn't necessarily make a good body....so perhaps a one piece guitar is not likely to succeed.

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Yes of course....my thought is that what makes a good neck doesn't necessarily make a good body....so perhaps a one piece guitar is not likely to succeed.

True but its been proven that a guitar with a two piece body will sound better then one with four pieces.

Im really curious on this, i wana see how one sounds.

And the guitar could have a good neck as well.

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`

 

Structurally, stability-wise, a one-piece

ax is very risky over the log run. Even if

it has a cool grain pattern, you should cut

it apart and then glue it back together.

 

Altho it would disrupt the grain pattern,

the better mway is to cut it up and reverse

the alterate [every other] pieces of wood

before gluing them together.

 

 

`

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`

 

Structurally, stability-wise, a one-piece

ax is very risky over the log run. Even if

it has a cool grain pattern, you should cut

it apart and then glue it back together.

 

Altho it would disrupt the grain pattern,

the better mway is to cut it up and reverse

the alterate [every other] pieces of wood

before gluing them together.

 

 

`

Yes you make a very good point there...wood will go it's own way if you allow it !! Some sort of stability has to be built into the guitar.

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my guitar teacher said some of the very

first Ibanez guitars (rare) were 1 piece...

I bleeb that refers only to the bodies. I'm

pretty sure all early Ibnez were bolt neck

or set neck construction.

 

So, you could say of those that "the neck

and body were made of one piece", but it's

unclear language. You'd do well to say "the

neck and body were all one piece", or "the

neck and body were "both one-piece". The

former being a truly one-piece ax, while the

latter refers to a bolt-on.

 

Such are the limitations of oral histories.

BTW I recently bought a brand new EBMM

whose neck and body are both one-piece.

And I've seen several others without having

to search high and low. It's not exactly a

rare phenominon.

 

 

 

`

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A solid gutar body can be made as one piece. In fact, if the guit tar industry wanted to they could do just that and save a lot of money in production. The down side is increased warranty risk to the manufacturer. The instability, already mentioned can be seen in any back yard deck with natural, wood, planking.

 

Wood is a natural substance and as such is susceptible to moving and changing it's shape due to age, humidity and temperature changes. Primarily, the risk to a single slab guitar body is the wood cupping and turning into a celery stick like object, only not quite so dramatic a cup, with the 'wings' rising up above the center-line.

 

By sandwiching two or three layers, usually with the grain being turned 90° to the next one below, the sandwich will resist cupping. One can also layer slabs of wood side-by-side like the planking of a bowling lane, just so long as the grain of adjacent slabs are not parallel to each other, cupping and warping are minimized.

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One piece.

 

Just thinking about all the machining and carving you'd have to do is giving me a headache.

 

One mistake would ruin the whole project - body and neck.

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Would a solid industrial benchtop made of 1-3/4" square maple spars laminated together qualify as "one chunk of wood"?? I made this out of a benchtop. It's one piece body/neck. Did it mostly with hand tools. I used a couple of wood rasps, some wood files, and some pictures to form it. Used an electric palm sander for rough finishing and a small hobby router for doing the truss rod slot in the neck, the pickup cavities, and the control cavity. A 3/8" power drill did the rest of the holes. Fortunately, it never occurred to me that one mistake would scrap the whole thing out! Also fortunate was I didn't make any mistakes. Was it a lot of work? Yeah, but it was worth it. A real learning experience (my first homemade guitar), and it turned out pretty good. Plays nice and sustains for weeks with the solid maple body/neck. I got most of the hardware at Stew-Mac, including the rosewood fretboard.

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I have a book "The Illustrated Directory of Guitars" by Nick Freeth and on page 31 is a Tom Anfield Bubinga Guitar made from one solid slab of Bubinga with an Ebony finger board. took him 3 months to carve.

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I have a book "The Illustrated Directory of Guitars" by Nick Freeth and on page 31 is a Tom Anfield Bubinga Guitar made from one solid slab of Bubinga with an Ebony finger board. took him 3 months to carve.

 

Can you post pics? B)

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