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deejams

Question about the Epiphone G-400 SG

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Hello y'all, first post here. Got a weird question.

 

I just played an Epi G-400 of a friends. It's nearly brand new, he said he hardly even played it. Anyway, it's a nice guitar and everything seems really sweet for the price, except one thing stood out as a little abnormal to me about the neck. Basically the play or "movement" in the neck seems really high--or easy to bend. I can strum a chord and really not put much pressure at all on the fretboard and it changes my pitch like a whammy bar. Now I've used this trick on stage with my Tele, but this thing reeeeally seemed to be very sensitive in that way. It makes me wonder if there isnt something wrong in his joint. The truss rod seems to be adjusted right, althought my friend said it was way out of whack when he got it. He said it took an unusual amount of turns to get the neck to straighten out. He said at first when he started adjusting the truss, it was turning like a loose screw, then it caught and he could see it straightening under his straight edge.

 

Anyway the neck was pretty straight and flt good. It had good action and playability. I just wonder why its so sensitive to movement? Has this been an issue for anyone else? I've never played an SG before so maybe its common. I was impressed with the guitar enough that I might buy one if I can figure out if this is a normal thing, or did he get a defect? I played a G chord, as if Angus were playing it--distortion and all. A little tension on the neck and it was changing pitch really easy. It seems that in order to play it and have it sound consistent, I'd have to play really light and not put much pressure on the fretboard or else it will sound out of tune.

 

Would love some feedback on this. Thanks in advance.

 

~Dee

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Hello y'all, first post here. Got a weird question.

The truss rod seems to be adjusted right, althought my friend said it was way out of whack when he got it. He said it took an unusual amount of turns to get the neck to straighten out. He said at first when he started adjusting the truss, it was turning like a loose screw, then it caught and he could see it straightening under his straight edge.

 

Dee,

 

First off...Welcome to the forum.

We do get some weird questions but this is not one of them.

You are more likely to get a weird answer. LOL (I know as I have been guilty of more than a few.)

 

Anyway, The story about your friend, his loose rod, and several turns would make me a little cautious to begin with.

Might not be a problem but how much are you willing to gamble on it?

 

Personally, I do not have a G400. Soooo.....not knowing anything about them (Like you) I would go to a store that carries them and check a few out. You would then have something to compare it to.

 

Sorry I can't give you a straight up answer...but...many around here have G400's and swear by them.

Let's hope a few chime in.

 

Sorry if this is not much help.

 

Willy

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Willie, thank you for the welcome!

 

I'm inclined to agree about the truss rod and being cautious about turning it. Every guitar of mine I've ever adjusted took very little turning to adjust. He said for some reason when he first adjusted it, it felt like it was "loose at first and then it grabbed and moved the neck." That's how he put it. I'm handy but no techy by any means so was no help to him on solving that one.

 

However the guitar impressed other than the neck thing. Playing it acoustically I could tell right away that it was a pretty good deal in the $300-350ish range. I could see working it over and having a real winner for a lot less $ than the Gibson version. I just have never felt a neck quite as 'movable' or wiggly. I'm definitely more used to a bolt on neck, or a Les Paul which has a very solid set neck. Maybe it's and SG thing, makes me wonder if the Gibsons SG's have the bendy neck too. The guitar ran true but had to be easy on it or it neck whammy'd me lol.

 

 

 

Dee,

 

First off...Welcome to the forum.

We do get some weird questions but this is not one of them.

You are more likely to get a weird answer. LOL (I know as I have been guilty of more than a few.)

 

Anyway, The story about your friend, his loose rod, and several turns would make me a little cautious to begin with.

Might not be a problem but how much are you willing to gamble on it?

 

Personally, I do not have a G400. Soooo.....not knowing anything about them (Like you) I would go to a store that carries them and check a few out. You would then have something to compare it to.

 

Sorry I can't give you a straight up answer...but...many around here have G400's and swear by them.

Let's hope a few chime in.

 

Sorry if this is not much help.

 

Willy

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I had a G-310, and I have a G-400. The "whammy bar" effect is definitely there. The neck has some flex. It's joined at the very end of the fretboard. It's to be expected.

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This isn't a technique I'd be too comfortable with, (intentional neck flexing), but it was used by Pete Townshend on SG's frequently. But yeah, they can move around some and you just kinda learn to expect it, sorta like adapting to the neck dive thing....

 

Wedgie

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This isn't a technique I'd be too comfortable with, (intentional neck flexing), but it was used by Pete Townshend on SG's frequently. But yeah, they can move around some and you just kinda learn to expect it, sorta like adapting to the neck dive thing....

 

Wedgie

 

Pete didn't have anything to worry about. He was going to smash the guitar before the end of the night anyhow. :lol:

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Well I'm glad to know it's expected for SG's to have the whammy bar neck. The joint definitely doesnt look "stout". At that price I think I'm going to pick one up here shortly. I notice the neck dive thing. It's definitely not balanced very well, but its still a lite guitar and I'm sure a good strap would help. The sound was nice and I bet with a few upgrades it could be real sweet. Never had one but always loved the way SG's look. They are gorgeous guitars.

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Well I'm glad to know it's expected for SG's to have the whammy bar neck. The joint definitely doesnt look "stout". At that price I think I'm going to pick one up here shortly. I notice the neck dive thing. It's definitely not balanced very well, but its still a lite guitar and I'm sure a good strap would help. The sound was nice and I bet with a few upgrades it could be real sweet. Never had one but always loved the way SG's look. They are gorgeous guitars.

 

I have a WIDE leather strap for mine. Really keeps it under control.

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Back in the day, I used to do the "whammy bar" effect with a

Gibson Les Paul, so even an LP can be "whammy-fied"! Interesting effect,

had it's uses....

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I just picked up a used MiK G400 Vintage in faded brown, the original release with the neck binding, not the current "faded" G400 that is available. I haven't noticed any problems with the whammy effect or any signs of poor quality. I can whammy the neck on my Les Paul just as I can on the SG if I want to. Like any guitar, you just have to get used to it's little quirks. As for the neck diving problem that everyone seems to complain about, that happens with any SG design and is easily corrected. The previous owner of my G400 simply taped a counter weight to the inside of the control cavity cover and problem solved. I love this guitar and since I got it, I've hardly touched my LP Standard. I'm sure that part of the reason is the Seymour Duncan pups in the SG and the great sound I get out of them. I now have two Epis, a Les Paul Standard Ebony and the above G400 and I couldn't be happier with the finish, the sound and the overall quality of both.

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imo, while the whammy bar effect is to be expected to some degree, it would be worth inspecting the neck joint for a hairline fracture or excess movement before you part with your hard earned cash.

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It is possible that the neck joint is loose, damaged, or has been a poor fit that was shimmed before gluing. Compare to other G400s in a shop and see if this is worse than those. Epi has a warranty that may be useful if it's a manufacturing problem.

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