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SG's strap button: does it hurt?

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Hi,

 

sorry to ask such a newbie's question, but I haven't had the opportunity to try a SG yet: does the strap button hurt the belly when playing a SG?

I'm used to play strat-like guitars, with strap button on the horn. I've never played any guitar with strap button located on the back of the instrument. I'm wondering if it induces any pain or discomfort.

 

Thanks

Larry

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Welcome to the Gibson forum !! Lots of good people and useful info here.

I really hope you use LOCKS and not just the factory installed BUTTONS that will eventually cause your investment to crash to the floor with much breakage and sadness....if you ARE using the stock buttons, I advise you to get locks as quickly as possible.

 

I used Schaller style locks on my 1st 2 SGs....neither "hurt" but would occasionally snag on my button down shirt front.

I use Dunlop "headless" press in locks on my current SG.......no hurt, no snag, secure locking, just be SURE you hear it "snap" or it's not inserted all the way and won't stay in the anchor.

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the guitar neck strap button will usually be to the left of the center of your body. also due to the neck angle usually the body is not flat against you, but angled back on the right side slightly, so there shouldn't be much contact at all with that side of the body.

 

definitely get some locking strap buttons.

 

also definitely be aware that SG's can be prone to neck dive, especially if you have aftermarket tuners on the headstock.

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Today I went to a GC and purchased some Jim Dunlop Straplocks to put onto my brand new Gibson SG 61 RI.

 

At first I was very hesitant to put these on with the concern of screwing the bigger screw through the neck.

 

Upon getting experienced advice I went ahead with it.

 

I took off the Gibson Strap Buttons and slowly wound in the new Straplock buttons.

 

The Jim Dunlop Screw is approx 2ml longer and a bit thicker.

 

Once I got to the fresh wood point of screwing into the mahogany, I started to get nervous but it was a breeze. JUST TO THINGS SLOWLY......

 

The JD straplocks are awesome, they now give me the assurance that I will not be picking up my baby from the ground in broken peices.

 

I am going to buy 2 more sets of these JD's as I currently have Schallers on my AM Standard Strat and My AM Deluxe Strat, I think the Schallers are coming off and the JD's will be going on.

 

I urge you to get onto putting Straplocks on your queen ASAP.

 

Cheers.

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both the Dunlop and Schaller locks have their strengths and their weaknesses. The JD button is HUGE, however it also works with a standard guitar strap in case you lose the locks. The Schaller button is much smaller, but can't easily take a normal strap. The dunlop lock plugs into the end of the strap button, so it sticks out a lot farther than the schaller lock, which goes around the strap button.

 

The Schaller locking mechanism itself has a "fail safe" design where most of the weight is born on the "cup" of the locking mechanism. The lock itself is a button on the inside and does not bear much weight at all. In the event of mechanical failure, your guitar won't go anywhere. The Dunlop lock on the other hand has three small ball bearings on a post that fit into a groove in the inside of the button. If the locking mechanism jams or gets dirty, it can fall off. if you aren't good about remembering to keep the inside of the button clean and oiling the lock once a year, I'd go with the Schallers.

 

Another thing to consider is the way the locking end attaches to the strap itself. The Dunlop end clips on with a sturdy spring clip that holds the strap between two washers, one of which is crown shaped to protect the locking button from accidentally being pushed. These are damn hard to get on/off, so I can't see them ever coming off accidentally. The Schaller ends have a washer and then a bolt (like on an input jack) that secures the strap in place. This can get loose as the strap ages and conforms more to the lock end, so you'll want to check the tightness periodically to make sure it won't be coming off.

 

So, each system has inherent strengths and weaknesses. I currently have 10 guitars and 2 basses. My Gibson and Heritage guitars (4) have Schaller locks. My Carvin guitars/basses (2 and 2), my Fender, and my Hamers all have dunlop locks. The Carvins AND the hamers actually came stock with dunlops. The fender was retrofitted. I can say that on guitars like the SG and my H535, which have the neck joint strap button, the dunlop is definitely lower profile.

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Guest BentonC

both the Dunlop and Schaller locks have their strengths and their weaknesses. The JD button is HUGE, however it also works with a standard guitar strap in case you lose the locks. The Schaller button is much smaller, but can't easily take a normal strap. The dunlop lock plugs into the end of the strap button, so it sticks out a lot farther than the schaller lock, which goes around the strap button.

 

The Schaller locking mechanism itself has a "fail safe" design where most of the weight is born on the "cup" of the locking mechanism. The lock itself is a button on the inside and does not bear much weight at all. In the event of mechanical failure, your guitar won't go anywhere. The Dunlop lock on the other hand has three small ball bearings on a post that fit into a groove in the inside of the button. If the locking mechanism jams or gets dirty, it can fall off. if you aren't good about remembering to keep the inside of the button clean and oiling the lock once a year, I'd go with the Schallers.

 

Another thing to consider is the way the locking end attaches to the strap itself. The Dunlop end clips on with a sturdy spring clip that holds the strap between two washers, one of which is crown shaped to protect the locking button from accidentally being pushed. These are damn hard to get on/off, so I can't see them ever coming off accidentally. The Schaller ends have a washer and then a bolt (like on an input jack) that secures the strap in place. This can get loose as the strap ages and conforms more to the lock end, so you'll want to check the tightness periodically to make sure it won't be coming off.

 

So, each system has inherent strengths and weaknesses. I currently have 10 guitars and 2 basses. My Gibson and Heritage guitars (4) have Schaller locks. My Carvin guitars/basses (2 and 2), my Fender, and my Hamers all have dunlop locks. The Carvins AND the hamers actually came stock with dunlops. The fender was retrofitted. I can say that on guitars like the SG and my H535, which have the neck joint strap button, the dunlop is definitely lower profile.

Wow- that's the most in-depth analysis of strap locks I've ever read. Great info!

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"The Schaller ends have a washer and then a bolt (like on an input jack) that secures the strap in place. This can get loose as the strap ages and conforms more to the lock end, so you'll want to check the tightness periodically to make sure it won't be coming off."

 

If you use schallers and you are concerned about this then simply use a little drop of blue locktite on the threads (ask a mechanic if you dont know what I am talking about). Blue locktite will prevent a nut and bolt coming undone

but will allow you to get it off when you need to. Dont be tempted to use the red version (or crazy glue) or you may not be able to get it off even when you want to.

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