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andrewjunior

pacemaker! i gots one

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Just picked up a 1964-65 Epiphone Pacemaker Tremolo amp. it's a 1x10, has volume, on/off switch, trem frequency and a fuse on the face. very simple. i love it.

i got it for 400 dollars at a local shop. it came with the original operator's manual and it smells like an antique shop. i love it!

 

volume all the way up on the amp with vol at 5 on my guitar makes a smooth bluesy clean tone i've always dreamed of. vol up on the amp and at ten on the guitar makes a natural distortion that makes me want to cry for joy!

 

When i built my Epi Junior project i was proud of it, but it never really sounded like anything special with the amps i played it through. until now. now i know exactly why i built the junior and why i spent the money on the pacemaker.

 

i hope to have some recordings in the near future to show off, but for now there's just pictures

 

blog34a.jpg?w=600&h=400

 

hope ya'll like it

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Looks super clean! Nice! I THINK this is the Gibson GA-5t, though don't quote me on that.

 

It appears that it might well be near mint, which could present a challenge for you. If the amp IS near mint, it's going to continue to appreciate and will always fetch more $$ on sale than the same amp in PLAYER condition. If this is the case, you'd be wise to park the amp, rather than play through it. A 46 year old amp is on borrowed time, particularly with regard to any electrolytic capacitors, and especially the filter caps. If one of these blows while you're playing the amp, it could quite possibly take out the output tubes, output transformer, and even the primary transformer. In short, you could instantly turn a near mint, collectible amp into a door stop, simply by playing through it.

 

In light of that, if you intend to use this as an investment, and sell it years down the road for more than you paid for it, it would be best to simply park it someplace safe, and leave it be, until you're ready to sell it, years down the road. Any wear that you introduce to it, if it's a near mint amp, is going to devalue it.

 

On the other hand, if it's not pristine, or if it's an amp that you'd rather play through than use as a collector's item, you should have a tech go through it completely, to bring everything up to spec. Either way, as a collector's item or a player's amp, the last thing you want is for 46 y/o filter caps to blow while you're playing it. A complete chassis overhaul, with new electrolytics, new resistors to replace those that have drifted out of tolerance, 3 prong cord, new tubes if necessary, etc., will cost you between $100-$200, and is well worth every penny, if you intend to use the amp. Not only will it sound even better, but it's be far more reliable for you.

 

Congrats on what appears to be real solid buy!

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Looks super clean! Nice! I THINK this is the Gibson GA-5t, though don't quote me on that.

 

It appears that it might well be near mint, which could present a challenge for you. If the amp IS near mint, it's going to continue to appreciate and will always fetch more $$ on sale than the same amp in PLAYER condition. If this is the case, you'd be wise to park the amp, rather than play through it. A 46 year old amp is on borrowed time, particularly with regard to any electrolytic capacitors, and especially the filter caps. If one of these blows while you're playing the amp, it could quite possibly take out the output tubes, output transformer, and even the primary transformer. In short, you could instantly turn a near mint, collectible amp into a door stop, simply by playing through it.

 

In light of that, if you intend to use this as an investment, and sell it years down the road for more than you paid for it, it would be best to simply park it someplace safe, and leave it be, until you're ready to sell it, years down the road. Any wear that you introduce to it, if it's a near mint amp, is going to devalue it.

 

On the other hand, if it's not pristine, or if it's an amp that you'd rather play through than use as a collector's item, you should have a tech go through it completely, to bring everything up to spec. Either way, as a collector's item or a player's amp, the last thing you want is for 46 y/o filter caps to blow while you're playing it. A complete chassis overhaul, with new electrolytics, new resistors to replace those that have drifted out of tolerance, 3 prong cord, new tubes if necessary, etc., will cost you between $100-$200, and is well worth every penny, if you intend to use the amp. Not only will it sound even better, but it's be far more reliable for you.

 

Congrats on what appears to be real solid buy!

 

 

thanks a bunch for the info. i appreciate it.

i think i'm buying a micro-amp pedal so i won't have to crank the volume up, and then i'm just gonna hope for the best. right now i don't have the money to buy a new amp and just let that one sit. plus it sounds so damn sexy...

for the majority of it's use, it'll be clean and vibey for alt country use.

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i think i'm buying a micro-amp pedal so i won't have to crank the volume up

Some points of consideration:

 

1. Your amp is roughly 45 years old. Unless you know that it's been serviced in the past 10 years, you can assume that it's never been serviced.

2. Filter caps and other electrolytic caps have a serviceable lifespan of roughly 15 years. This means that anytime after that period, they can blow.

3. Filter caps that blow when an amp is on can cause catastrophic failures of the output tubes, output transformer, and primary transformer.

4. Your filter caps can blow with or without the microamp.

5. Having your amp brought fully up to factory fresh specs would likely cost you $100-$150.

6. Your amp will sound profoundly better and stronger, more balanced, more punchy, and more alive, once it's been serviced.

7. If the amp blows, you're going to kick yourself hard for a long, long time.

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Some points of consideration:

 

1. Your amp is roughly 45 years old. Unless you know that it's been serviced in the past 10 years, you can assume that it's never been serviced.

2. Filter caps and other electrolytic caps have a serviceable lifespan of roughly 15 years. This means that anytime after that period, they can blow.

3. Filter caps that blow when an amp is on can cause catastrophic failures of the output tubes, output transformer, and primary transformer.

4. Your filter caps can blow with or without the microamp.

5. Having your amp brought fully up to factory fresh specs would likely cost you $100-$150.

6. Your amp will sound profoundly better and stronger, more balanced, more punchy, and more alive, once it's been serviced.

7. If the amp blows, you're going to kick yourself hard for a long, long time.

Excellent advice [thumbup]:-({|=

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