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Lungimsam

Tried another new SG Standard Bass today.

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I know what you mean about the 34" scale. I just got tired of working harder to get the same results. The bevel cuts aren't critical to me, I still have good access to the 19th & 20th frets. I also prefer the newer bridge over the style I had on my 1969 EB0. I may have mentioned I was using two other SG Std.'s until my current one came in. Both were current mfg. They both sounded great. One was a Faded Cherry, the other a Heritage Cherry. The Faded returned for a Heritage, and the Heritage was a floor model with a ding in the body i used temporarily. This one that I play now is my keeper. My only bass.

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I guess you could say that it's pretty much an EB3 with it having the two pickups. Amps today have so much more availability to make more voices and sounds that was not even dreamt about past amps. A G&L SB-2 model has a Precision neck pick up, and a Jazz bridge pickup with only volume controls on board for each pickup. You just do you adjustments on the amp. Less circuitry and switches on the bass to possibly mess up. They cost about the same as a Gibson SG Std. Heritage, depending on how you have it made up. 34" Scale on those guys also. That was my trade in for my Gibson. Don't regret it either.

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A friend played a 1969 EB0 through an Acoustic 361 for both studio and stage. It had a sound that was crisp a bottom that wouldn't quit.

Oh, man. [thumbup]

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`

 

 

What's with the fuss about slightly better access to

the 19/20th fret ? Do we have geetards in disguise

here ? Ready the pitchforks and torches !

 

 

 

 

`

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`

 

 

What's with the fuss about slightly better access to

the 19/20th fret ? Do we have geetards in disguise

here ? Ready the pitchforks and torches !

 

 

 

 

`

 

The thought occurred to me, too.

 

But we are talking about short scale Gibson basses, so it's not likely you'd hear any difference anyway. (If I did smiles, well, you know.)

 

Signed,

 

The one who ran away from the buzzy farty sound 35 years ago.

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Guys,

 

Access to the upper frets has nothing to do with it. The reason I like the smaller neck joint and deeper bevelling on the cutaways like on the '61 is just because I think it looks cool. There is a definite difference in these areas, as well as the pointier upper horn of the '60's EB3's that I like. To some this is not a big deal, but I really like the looks of it, and so might wait to see if Gibson will put out a '61 reissue next year. Especially since it'll be a 50 year anniversary thing. Who knows?

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No problem, just don't go Fender on us. Just kidding! The three point bridge is I think one of the best improvements.

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No problem, just don't go Fender on us. Just kidding! The three point bridge is I think one of the best improvements.

 

 

The only way I would go Fender over SG Bass at this point is if Fender put out walnut precisions again (not Squire). They haven't since the 70's. Otherwise, I'm going shortscale with an SG or EB3. If I can't hold out any longer, I'll get the SG. I just wish I could get some kinda answer outta Gibson at this point so I could just know what to do right now. I called customer service, but they said they don't get any info about new releases until a decision by Gibson is made public. Tried posting to Henry J., but I can't start a new post on his page for some reason.

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Being a bigger guy (6 foot 4 inches mind you) I can take on any 34 inch scale. Maybe a short scale might be too small for me to play, but playing the bass solo on the song "All Right Now" by "Free" is tough on a 34 inch neck.

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It's like a gamble, hoping you guess right. The walnut I don't think has the same residence of the mahogany. I may be way wrong, but I think the wood in the body of an electric bass does affect the sound some what.

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`

 

Guys,

 

Access to the upper frets has nothing to do with it.

The reason I like the smaller neck joint and deeper

bevelling on the cutaways like on the '61 is just

because I think it looks cool. There is a definite

difference in these areas, as well as the pointier

upper horn of the '60's EB3's that I like. To some

this is not a big deal, but I really like the looks of it,

and so might wait to see if Gibson will put out a '61

reissue next year. Especially since it'll be a 50 year

anniversary thing. Who knows?

 

There are plenty of excellent but lesser known

custom builders out there whose pricing is no

stiffer than buying a Gibson USA at "street"

discount [when or if available]. Maybe you can

have your EB/EG custom built. IIRC, you like

the older style woodwork but the newer style

controls. Building a solid body bass is not

rocket science, and you can mix together the

features you want, possibly for LESS money

than buying a Gibby at discount.

 

If you want the case with the white bunny fur

you'll prolly hafta get that from Gibson ....

 

IIRC, Duncan makes top grade clones of

Gibson PU's, or maybe you prefer Barts ?

If it were MY custom SG, I'd find a way to

maintain the SG style but sneak in a bit

longer horn. Just an inch will do wonders

for the strap balance.

 

 

 

`

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"All Right Now" by "Free" is a kicking song. I saw them do it in 1972 when they were on tour with Faces.

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Am I the only bass player who doesn't like the 30" short scale? all of my basses are long scale and I have no issues playing, I feel like I have plenty of room to work the fingerboard.

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Am I the only bass player who doesn't like the 30" short scale? all of my basses are long scale and I have no issues playing, I feel like I have plenty of room to work the fingerboard.

 

 

I have always played 34" scale Pbasses and I love them. But I am looking forward to a little ease with the 30" SG scale.

I'm 5'7" and 34" scale is great for me, plenty of access to all frets and no stretching probs, but I can see where a shortscale would make things a little easier below the 4th fret.

 

What stuns me is the fact that they make 36" scale length basses, too. I think that would be too tough for me below the 5th fret.

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`

 

I have always played 34" scale Pbasses and I love

them. But I am looking forward to a little ease with

the 30" SG scale.

 

I'm 5'7" and 34" scale is great for me, plenty of

access to all frets and no stretching probs, but I

can see where a shortscale would make things a

little easier below the 4th fret.

 

What stuns me is the fact that they make 36" scale

length basses, too. I think that would be too tough

for me below the 5th fret.

 

Once you get into really extra long scales,

the tone is different and lower tunings are

more practical. If those things matter, then

you just manage to play it, just like little

5'5" chix play 41" URBs.

 

-------------------------------

 

Ackchewly, I shoulda mentioned 5'5" doodz

or even 5'8" doodz instead of chix. Cuz chix,

as a sub species, are already quite used to

operating in a world built for a sub species of

doodz of about 5'10" and over. It's the under

5'10" sub species of doodz that face greater

challenge, cuz their DDNA [Dood DNA] lacks

the Accomodation Gene that CDNA [guess]

tends to have. Lacking a few inches of reach

doesn't alter their DDNA. The Accomodation

Gene is incompatible with the Y-chromosome.

 

As to whether 30" basses are "real" or even

practical .... I figger that since there's also 20"

and 28" basses on the market, then 30" can't

be marginal cuz it's nearly mid-pack for bass

guitars. It's a nano-world.

 

 

 

`

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The last bass I had with a 34" scale was a G&L SB-2 with a 7.5 radius neck. A jazz neck, comfortable, but not as good for me as the short scale.

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I like short scale, I like long scale.

 

I just hate P-Bass necks, they are just two wide for my taste.

 

Give me a jazz neck any day.

 

I prefer a P neck over a jazz neck if I'm playing a Fender. Go figure. They are great for slapping and popping, and a Gibson isn't so great for slapping and popping. It's just a different tool for a different purpose, I guess. Switching between 34" or 35", 30" and a guitar isn't as big a deal as you might think. A friend switches between guitar and mandolin. That's a huge switch, partly because of size, partly because a mandolin is generally tuned in fifths, not fourths.

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`

 

For the 36' scale basses with lower tuning,

does the action have to be higher, in general?

 

On any given bass, the lower you tune it, the

more you usually hafta raise the action. But I

have 30", 34" and 35" all tuned DGCF, and

all have very similar action, so I expect a 36"

would just continue that trend.

 

I answered by reasonable extrapolation, only

an inch outside my real experience ... but you

can check with real experts on longer scales

and lower tunings ... ratcheer:

 

http://octave4plus.com/

 

 

 

 

`

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