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Sad!


jannusguy2

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Hell - just take some Elmer's glue to those cracks and slap a Bridge Doctor in the thing.

 

While the problems you can see can be pretty easily dealt with you might very well also be looking at messed up or missing braces, a screwed up neck, and other stuff in addition to the issues that are visible. Chances are you will also end up with a guitar that does not sound like it once did. Then again, if you don't know what it sounded like once upon a time I guess it does not really matter.

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See... I would like to play this guitar.

 

What is sad about it is that some person with some level of repair ability is going pick this one up, repair it, and

turn around & try to "flip" it for a tidy profit. The unsuspecting buyer would love to see these "before" shots. This

is one reason why it's worth the extra $ to go to a reputable dealer for vintage.

 

Irregardless...

That has got to be one of the largest top cracks I've seen in a long time. Don't need to MRI scan this one to inspect the

bracing pattern... you can see the tone bars right thru the cracks!

This looks like one of the survivors from the Nashville flood...

Yes, some of that "figuring" on the neck at frets 5 into 4, and 9 & 10 look more like water stains. Anyone want to make a guess as to what this one'll go for in 5 days?

 

Yes, safe to figure on $1000 worth of work. Then again, consider the sonic properties of glue & cleats...

 

FWIW: 2 people began their reply to the O.P. with the phrase "My luthier...". Uh-oh.

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2 things about this one:

 

1. this is a guitar to inspect in person before buying. you don't know what is really going on. waterlogged? what else?

 

2. Gibson is NEVER the right place to send a vintage repair. it may be the same name, but it's not the same company that built this guitar.... there are plenty of guys out there that will do a much better job, and charge you less than the big G

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Looks as it was found on the bottom of a wishing well. Would take an archaeolog luthier to get...

 

Well, "my luthier" is a Certified Archaeological Luthier, and should be up to the task.

 

Now- I wonder what was being wished for when it was thrown into the well...

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Wouldn't any still enthusiastic luthier be glad to throw himself into a task like this - One thing is to adjust actions, change bridges and frets - but to respirit vintage mandolins, lutes and J-45's. YES Sir !

 

By the way, the spiral string/strap looks familiar. They are seen several times before, often in much better condition of course. Have an idea they might have been standard or very common at some point. Is it blue, red, white.

Anyway, that should exclude former underwater existence. I now imagine moist basement or garage.

And by the way again, what would the alternative to restoration be, , , back in the shadows or the next bonfire. Even sadder. . .

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Just checked back on the listing, $1300 and climbing. More than one person is seeing some potential. It is actually a quite desirable, early J45. Noticed the lack of metal truss rod(war-time). I am sure it has a substantially beefy neck profile!

I sure wouldn't want to 'hone' my lutherie skills on this. I would take it to an experienced luthier. I would not send it to Gibson for restoration either.

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This will likely turn out to be a great guitar. It's a circa 1943, mahogany topped version. Instead of an adjustable metal truss rod, it's got a maple "V" shaped neck reinforcement. You can see the outline of the maple piece in the headstock. Here's a guitar from the same batch (in only a bit better condition): FON 2315-27. I've not played the guitar in my registry, but it is reputed to be stellar.

 

These maple reinforced necks are, indeed, "beefy." These are great, lightweight guitars. I have a 1943 SJ that I love.

 

As teh bidding reveals, folks are looking to get a rare guitar at a discounted price. I'll be interested to see where the bidding ends.

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It's a wartime J-45. For that simple reason - it's a wartime Banner Head J-45 - it is worth preserving and/or restoring to playable condition if at all possible. Throw in the mahogany top and no truss rod aspect, and you've got a cultural artifact. It's more than just a guitar at this point.

 

I've had guitars in similar condition and have eagerly sought them out. 15 years ago when I was single and had no kids, I dropped lots of money into several old basket case guitars - a '30s roundhole L-4 with a hole chopped into the top for a pickup, a stripped L-7 from the 40s, a '47 Epiphone Broadway with no hardware and a broken truss rod - and the king of the lot, a refinned c.1950 J-45 with literally dozens of major cracks due to the neck block's slipping. In every single case, the resulting guitar was WONDERFUL. Not just nice, but freaking WONDERFUL.

 

This one really does deserve a fine luthier and the money spent to make it right - not some hack slap-dash slap on of popsicle sticks and Elmer's glue, and certainly not some miserable kludge like a Bridge Doctor, for cryin' out loud.

 

So it looks like it swam down the Cumberland after being dragged behind a burning tank - repaired properly, I bet it would sound amazing. I'm hoping it goes to somebody more interested in restoring and playing it, and not to somebody who'll cobble it together and flip it.

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