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dem00n

What was the first guitar solo ever?

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Awwwww....

 

C'mon Golem...

 

Most of my gigs are "solo." You're saying I'm not doing a solo?

 

Joe Pass wasn't playing "solo guitar?"

 

m

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`

 

Awwwww....

 

C'mon Golem...

 

Most of my gigs are "solo." You're saying I'm

not doing a solo?

 

Joe Pass wasn't playing "solo guitar?"

 

m

 

Right, you are NOT "doing a solo" when your GIG

is solo ! But thaz not a knock. I'm just trying

to keep to the original idea of the question in

the thread title, of "What/when was the first

guitar solo?"

 

Yes, you ARE playing "solo guitar", as was JP.

 

That question does NOT ask "how long ago" or

"where and by whom" did some guitarist, lutist

or whatever play his ax all by his lonesome.

Why ask THAT question ? Everybody knows that

the earliest example of some lone dood just

plucking or strumming is lost and undocumented.

 

Therefor, the question must be asking "How long

ago" and "where and/or by whom" was the guitar

FIRST given a boost in respect where it stepped

out front to be featured, or IOW "given a solo".

 

Clearly, you cannot be "featured" if you're the

only player on the gig ! Likewise you cannot be

"given a solo" if you just gave it to yourself

cuz there's no one else around to give it to you.

You wanna be "featured" or "highlighted" you've

gotta have milieu to emerge out front of, not

just out of a vacuum ! No ensemble = no solo.

 

A solo performer [such as Joe Pass] is neither

taking a solo nor being given a solo. So, yes,

he is 'performing solo' but not playing 'a solo'.

 

It's the "figure-and-ground" thing. a matter of

context. A soloist temorarily "takes the lead"

[or is given the lead. Well, the "leader" of a

"band of one" is not leading anything. He may

be a self actualized individual, but he is NOT

a leader of anything or anyone.

 

It's puzzling that it's not hugely self-evident

that all the blather about "early players surely

played alone" is just dodging the question. We

all acknowledge that early players surely played

alone. But ho-hum, we know that went on before

history. There's no question there, cuz we know

the answer is vague or no answer at all. Thus

the only way to read the original question of

the thread is :

 

" When was the guitar first given that boost in

respect where it stepped out front [of the band]

and was featured, or IOW 'given a solo', and who

did it ? "

 

 

 

 

`

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`

 

Awwwww....

 

C'mon Golem...

 

Most of my gigs are "solo." You're saying I'm

not doing a solo?

 

Joe Pass wasn't playing "solo guitar?"

 

m

 

Right, thaz what I'm saying.

 

You are NOT "doing a solo" when your GIG

is solo ! But thaz not a knock. I'm just trying

to keep to the original idea of the question in

the thread title, of "What/when was the first

guitar solo?"

 

Yes, you ARE playing "solo guitar", as was JP.

 

The question does NOT ask "how long ago" or

"where and by whom" did some guitarist, lutist

or whatever play his ax all by his lonesome.

Why ask THAT question ? Everybody knows that

the earliest example of some lone dood just

plucking or strumming is lost and undocumented.

 

Therefor, the question must be asking "How long

ago" and "where and/or by whom" was the guitar

FIRST given a boost in respect where it stepped

out front to be featured, or IOW "given a solo".

 

Clearly, you cannot be "featured" if you're the

only player on the gig ! Likewise you cannot be

"given a solo" if you just gave it to yourself

cuz there's no one else around to give it to you.

You wanna be "featured" or "highlighted" you've

gotta have milieu to emerge out front of, not

just out of a vacuum ! No ensemble = no solo.

 

A solo performer [such as Joe Pass] is neither

taking a solo nor being given a solo. So, yes,

he is 'performing solo' but not playing 'a solo'.

 

It's the "figure-and-ground" thing, a matter of

context. A soloist temorarily "takes the lead",

or is given the lead. Well, the "leader" of a

"band of one" is not leading anything. He may

be a self actualized individual, but he is NOT

a leader of anything or anyone.

 

It's puzzling that it's not hugely self-evident

that all the blather about "early players surely

played alone" is just dodging the question. We

all acknowledge that early players surely played

alone. But ho-hum, we know that went on before

history. There's no question there, cuz we know

the answer is vague or no answer at all. Thus

the only way to read the original question of

the thread is :

 

" When was the guitar first given that boost in

respect where it stepped out front [of the band]

and was featured, or IOW 'given a solo', and who

did it ? "

 

 

 

 

`

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`

 

 

 

Right, thaz what I'm saying.

 

You are NOT "doing a solo" when your GIG

is solo ! But thaz not a knock. I'm just trying

to keep to the original idea of the question in

the thread title, of "What/when was the first

guitar solo?"

 

Yes, you ARE playing "solo guitar", as was JP.

 

The question does NOT ask "how long ago" or

"where and by whom" did some guitarist, lutist

or whatever play his ax all by his lonesome.

Why ask THAT question ? Everybody knows that

the earliest example of some lone dood just

plucking or strumming is lost and undocumented.

 

Therefor, the question must be asking "How long

ago" and "where and/or by whom" was the guitar

FIRST given a boost in respect where it stepped

out front to be featured, or IOW "given a solo".

 

Clearly, you cannot be "featured" if you're the

only player on the gig ! Likewise you cannot be

"given a solo" if you just gave it to yourself

cuz there's no one else around to give it to you.

You wanna be "featured" or "highlighted" you've

gotta have milieu to emerge out front of, not

just out of a vacuum ! No ensemble = no solo.

 

A solo performer [such as Joe Pass] is neither

taking a solo nor being given a solo. So, yes,

he is 'performing solo' but not playing 'a solo'.

 

It's the "figure-and-ground" thing, a matter of

context. A soloist temorarily "takes the lead",

or is given the lead. Well, the "leader" of a

"band of one" is not leading anything. He may

be a self actualized individual, but he is NOT

a leader of anything or anyone.

 

It's puzzling that it's not hugely self-evident

that all the blather about "early players surely

played alone" is just dodging the question. We

all acknowledge that early players surely played

alone. But ho-hum, we know that went on before

history. There's no question there, cuz we know

the answer is vague or no answer at all. Thus

the only way to read the original question of

the thread is :

 

" When was the guitar first given that boost in

respect where it stepped out front [of the band]

and was featured, or IOW 'given a solo', and who

did it ? "

 

 

 

 

`

 

Most excellent! =D> Very well put.

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I guess we also need to clarify what we mean by "solo".

 

Does this mean simply playing guitar by yourself following a chart, or does it mean improvising possibly over some kind of backing?

 

There was certainly solo guitar in the 1700s as in playing a chart by yourself:

 

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Classical-Guitar-Treasury-Solo-Guitar/3852436

 

Louis Armstrong is generally credited with the idea of playing an improvised solo in a jazz context. Prior to that, jazz musicians soloed - but following a chart.

 

Before jazz, there was improvisation. One style is the taqsim - long and elaborate improvised intros but played on the oud.

 

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=56yJyyy1MEIC&pg=PA14&lpg=PA14&dq=taqsim+on+guitar&source=bl&ots=FeBYk6kAns&sig=2KUpGHL5s9m_eCB9H7xaUCy2mGc&hl=en#v=onepage&q=taqsim%20on%20guitar&f=false

 

What I am wondering then is whether there were improvisations on guitar. This article talks about improvisation over flamenco but seems to suggest that it is a new idea.

 

http://prsync.com/hober-smith/flamenco-guitar-solo-article-17494/

 

RN

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`

 

Well RN, I kinda see your point here.

 

To some degree, one COULD be "taking a solo"

despite the absence of other players, if one is in

a tradition where usually the solo performer was

expected to play "by the book" ... yet one is now

taking new liberties and improvising relative to

"the book".

 

I can see how such a player has not "stepped out"

from an ensemble, yet has "stepped out", from a

known and rather unchanging procession of prior

performances by other players. Somehow, a rather

hidebound tradition makes the other players sorta

"present", even across time.

 

Thanks for sharing. I can change my mind [partially].

Nevertheless, it still requires more than the simple

absence of any other players on the stage to define

"a solo". "Solo performance" is NOT synonymous

with "Taking a solo". It's STILL about stepping out.

 

 

 

`

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