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I consider a tune-o-matic with the screws facing the pickups on backwards.


Goldenvoice

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I think the title pretty much says it. The new Epi came with the tune-o-matic set so the adjustment screws are dead-heading into the bridge pickup. I googled photos of 175s in general, and saw about a 50/50 as far as which way they face on others guitars...

 

Oh, and while I'm on the subject: my 58 175 has white plastic (I assume it's plastic) saddle pieces; the new Epi has chrome ones. The metal seems to ring though to the strings past the bridge; the tails sing along - never noticed that on the 58...

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There are two distinct models of 'Tune-o-matic' bridges commonly fitted to todays Gibson guitars.

 

The original, the ABR-1, has the screws facing the p-up. This should be what you have on your Blonde. It also seems to be the type fitted on the Epi.

 

ABR-1.jpg

 

The second type, the so-called 'Nashville', has the screws facing the stop-bar.

 

Nashville-1.jpg

 

The second type was introduced in order to address a few areas where the ABR-1 design could be improved - the most obvious of which was dispensing with the need to have the retaining wire.

 

As far as the solid-bodied instruments go, a general (and very simplistic) rule-of-thumb is the ABR-1s are found on the re-issues whereas the regular Gibson USA production has Nashville bridges fitted. I'm not sure about the semi's and hollow-bodies. Perhaps they have the ABR-1 as the Nashville bridge requires fairly hefty bushes to be fitted into the body to accept the height-adjustment screws. :-k

 

I've seen some very famous players with original 59 Les Pauls where they have the bridge flipped. This may be as it (possibly) allows for easier intonation adjustment.

 

P.

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Oh, and while I'm on the subject: my 58 175 has white plastic (I assume it's plastic) saddle pieces; the new Epi has chrome ones. The metal seems to ring though to the strings past the bridge; the tails sing along - never noticed that on the 58...

 

Many jazz players go for a plain wood bridge with a one piece 'compensating' saddle

My best/worst experience of 'sing along' is with a Fender Jazzmaster...for me an interesting alternate take on the 'jazz guitar'

 

V

 

:-({|=

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I always thought the screws were supposed to face the bridge on my Epi as well...until I was told otherwise. They still face the bridge, and the intonation is probably off (maybe), but I cant tell. As long as the saddles are correct, what does it matter? More specifically, what does it matter on my $200 banger? [biggrin]

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Gee, you guys reminded me of another strange anomaly with my 58. I do a fair amount of palming, and this last summer, I started getting an occasional 'prick' on the side of my right hand - bad - like someone seriously jabbed me with a sewing needle!

 

I initially thought it was a small edge of chrome, where it's coming loose on the corner of the tune-o-matic, and gently smoothed it with 600 grit sandpaper. Didn't solve the issue, and the next gig, when I felt it again, I actually started bleeding.

 

I was starting to think my Gibby was possessed!

 

Finally, I discovered the wire across the bridge had literally "faded" in two, and one end was rotating up and outward randomly. That little piece of spring steel was sharper than any sewing needle I've ever encountered!

 

So I took it off.

 

Should I replace it?

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I'm the opposite - I don't like having the screws face the tailpiece.

i think it looks bad. Adjusting is no problem either way.

Then I'll disagree for the sake of argument.

 

The screws SHOULD face the tailpiece.

 

[-(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[woot][flapper][thumbup]

 

Actually, that is the way I prefer them - for easier access if nothing else.

Never meant enough to me to bother swapping the saddles around though.

 

 

Cosmetics?

What, you don't want anybody to know there are adjustment screws in your bridge? [blink]

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So I took it off.

 

Should I replace it?

 

 

You can leave it off, just remember that wire is what holds the sattles in place when your strings are not on top of them. In other words brake astring while playing and good luck finding the sattle that went flying...

 

As Dave said; the wire was added so that the saddles wouldn't 'disappear' if a string broke. Disastrous if you are in the middle of a gig.

 

As you are a gigging guy I'd replace it. Very soon.....

 

Good luck with the gigs this weekend, BTW!

 

P.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't own a Gibson yet, but I own four Epiphones. Three of them have the tune-o-matic bridge, and all three of them have the screw-heads facing the pickups. My Traveler Speedster also has a similar bridge, as does my Schecter C1 Diamond Elite. So there are five guitars of mine which all have the screw heads facing the pickups. I never knew they did it any other way.

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