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hummingbird fret markers


alittleguitar

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a friend had a hummingbird sitting in the corner for quite a few years until he recently passed it on to me. i was greatly touched by his generosity but something struck me. instead of the split parallelogram fretmarkers, this one has simple rectangles. the serial number dates it to the early '70s. did gibson not do the split parallelograms for a while?

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They changed to the straight ones around then and continued up through the 70'ties, maybe a good bite into the next decade. Lots of other things changed as well. Someone will probably raise his voice and tell precisely what happened when. In the meanwhile, let me pass you the incrowd word for your coming research - Schyyyyyy, , , ready :

NORLIN !

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They changed to the straight ones around then and continued up through the 70'ties, maybe a good bite into the next decade. Lots of other things changed as well. Someone will probably raise his voice and tell precisely what happened when. In the meanwhile, let me pass you the incrowd word for your coming research - Schyyyyyy, , , ready :

NORLIN !

ah, i see; thanks. that was also about the time the quality dipped, too, wasn it?

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ah, i see; thanks. that was also about the time the quality dipped, too, wasn it?

 

Some claim that But if you play it and it sounds good, what the heck.

 

I have a Norlin-era Dove and a Bozeman Dove. I'll put the sound of my '79 Dove up against any I've ever heard.

 

Enjoy your 'Bird.

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ah, i see; thanks. that was also about the time the quality dipped, too, wasn it?

 

 

The so called Norlin era was the period from 1970 to 85/86, where the company was taken over by people who knew more about business than making guitars. If you are interested in the changing specs, you might also wanna know what went on out of eyes reach.

 

Under the top of many acoustics, there is a wooden cross-structure called the X. This is basically what hold things together. To make the guitars stronger, a second of these were introduced and placed behind the first one in the lower direction. The downside to this, was that 2 of these 'claws' was too much and inhibited the vibe of the top-wood.

That would be the main factor of the notorious Norlin word.

 

A month ago I played 2 70'ties Hummingbirds on private sale just across the street (blonde and cherry r) and the seller - a semi pro - didn't know about this, guess many people don't. The cherry r was rather good, but the blonde definitely didn't live up to the price or the Gibson name. I personally owned 2 square shouldered late-70'ties G.'s as a youngster and though I had a hard time admitting it, they were quiet as nones and without any real acoustic projection. That said, I tried a 72 C&W this fall, which sounded not loud, but in a sense better than my 68 Southern Jumbo, which has the single X, though in heavier wood than earlier versions of the same guitar.

 

So as you see, there is a lot of landscape to go through and that's what we dauntlessly do in this Forum. Don't know how much you play and how far you've come, but congrats on the new H-bird, what a X-mas gift - and if it flies for you, GREAT !

 

BTW Birds, square shouldered SJ's and Country & Westerns hold similar DNA.

 

 

 

 

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The so called Norlin era was the period from 1970 to 85/86, where the company was taken over by people who knew more about business than making guitars. If you are interested in the changing specs, you might also wanna know what went on out of eyes reach.

 

Under the top of many acoustics, there is a wooden cross-structure called the X. This is basically what hold things together. To make the guitars stronger, a second of these were introduced and placed behind the first one in the lower direction. The downside to this, was that 2 of these 'claws' was too much and inhibited the vibe of the top-wood.

That would be the main factor of the notorious Norlin word.

 

A month ago I played 2 70'ties Hummingbirds on private sale just across the street (blonde and cherry r) and the seller - a semi pro - didn't know about this, guess many people don't. The cherry r was rather good, but the blonde definitely didn't live up to the price or the Gibson name. I personally owned 2 square shouldered late-70'ties G.'s as a youngster and though I had a hard time admitting it, they were quiet as nones and without any real acoustic projection. That said, I tried a 72 C&W this fall, which sounded not loud, but in a sense better than my 68 Southern Jumbo, which has the single X, though in heavier wood than earlier versions of the same guitar.

 

So as you see, there is a lot of landscape to go through and that's what we dauntlessly do in this Forum. Don't know how much you play and how far you've come, but congrats on the new H-bird, what a X-mas gift - and if it flies for you, GREAT !

 

BTW Birds, square shouldered SJ's and Country & Westerns hold similar DNA.

 

That pretty well sums up 70's Birds. My 77 Bird sounded more like a turkey.

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The so called Norlin era was the period from 1970 to 85/86, where the company was taken over by people who knew more about business than making guitars. If you are interested in the changing specs, you might also wanna know what went on out of eyes reach.

 

Under the top of many acoustics, there is a wooden cross-structure called the X. This is basically what hold things together. To make the guitars stronger, a second of these were introduced and placed behind the first one in the lower direction. The downside to this, was that 2 of these 'claws' was too much and inhibited the vibe of the top-wood.

That would be the main factor of the notorious Norlin word.

 

A month ago I played 2 70'ties Hummingbirds on private sale just across the street (blonde and cherry r) and the seller - a semi pro - didn't know about this, guess many people don't. The cherry r was rather good, but the blonde definitely didn't live up to the price or the Gibson name. I personally owned 2 square shouldered late-70'ties G.'s as a youngster and though I had a hard time admitting it, they were quiet as nones and without any real acoustic projection. That said, I tried a 72 C&W this fall, which sounded not loud, but in a sense better than my 68 Southern Jumbo, which has the single X, though in heavier wood than earlier versions of the same guitar.

 

So as you see, there is a lot of landscape to go through and that's what we dauntlessly do in this Forum. Don't know how much you play and how far you've come, but congrats on the new H-bird, what a X-mas gift - and if it flies for you, GREAT !

 

BTW Birds, square shouldered SJ's and Country & Westerns hold similar DNA.

Nice tutorial E-minor7! As far as the DNA grouping that you mention, I would throw the latter 60's to early 70,s J160E into the 'tube' also. It went from round to square-shouldered at that time and to further deaden the acoustics....it was ladder-braced and ply-top....Yikes! The redeeming factor to that was.....they were adorned with a P-90 pickup!

I speak from personal experience. I had a '69 for several years. It played and sounded like an unplugged electric. Sweetest neck ever on an acoustic. It now resides in Norway via Ebay. Think..."Norwegian Wood" [blink]

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... I would throw the latter 60's to early 70,s J160E into the 'tube' also. ...it was ladder-braced and ply-top....Yikes! The redeeming factor to that was.....they were adorned with a P-90 pickup! ...

 

An attempt by Gibson to cut down feedback as the guitar was meant for amped usage. And conversely, isn't this the guitar (J-160E) that makes the feedback intro for the Beatles' "I Feel Fine" ?

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An attempt by Gibson to cut down feedback as the guitar was meant for amped usage. And conversely, isn't this the guitar (J-160E) that makes the feedback intro for the Beatles' "I Feel Fine" ?

I am not sure about the where the feedback came from in that song, but the Beatles J-160E's were slightly different animals,(than the '69) being round-shouldered and possibly solid spruce topped.

Another oddity of the J160E, Is its shorter 24-1/2" scale and the body meets the neck at the 15th fret...Rod

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I'm almost sure the Feel Fine feedback came from one of the 2 160's acquired at Rushworths in 1962*. Remember reading a John-interview where he said the sound was discovered by sheer coincidence as the guitar was leaning against some amp with the volume still on, when the 4 of them left the studio 2 ground-floor for some upstairs listening. He also stated that the IFF intro was the first trace of heavy metal ever. A bit bold - still a fairly rousing buzzzz. . .

 

The extraordinary cool lick itself (I always thought was totally original), was in reality inspired by an American soulblues artist whose name I don't recall. Check the tv-documentary 'Lennons Jukebox' to find out.

 

*Well, the track was recorded in 64, which means it's another third exemplar. Lennons first J-160 E (which on paper was Harrisons - they switched) was stolen from a theater in 63.

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And here the Wikileak :

 

The intro to "I Feel Fine" starts with a single, percussive (yet pure-sounding) feedback note produced by plucking the A-note on McCartney's bass guitar, which was picked up on Lennon's semi-acoustic guitar. This was the very first use of feedback on a rock record. According to McCartney, "John had a semi-acoustic Gibson guitar. It had a pick-up on it so it could be amplified... We were just about to walk away to listen to a take when John leaned his guitar against the amp. I can still see him doing it... it went, 'Nnnnnnwahhhhh!" And we went, 'What's that? Voodoo!' 'No, it's feedback.' Wow, it's a great sound!' George Martin was there so we said, 'Can we have that on the record?' 'Well, I suppose we could, we could edit it on the front.' It was a found object, an accident caused by leaning the guitar against the amp."[3]

 

While sounding very much like an electric guitar, Lennon played it on an acoustic (a Gibson model J-160E),[8] employing the guitar's onboard pickup and 1960s sound effect devices to make the acoustic guitar sound more electronic. The intro riff around a D major chord progresses to a C, then a G, where the G major vocals begin. Just before the coda, Lennon's intro riff (or ostinato), is repeated with a bright sound by George Harrison on electric guitar (a Gretsch Tennessean),[8] followed by the more electric sound of John on amped acoustic.[7][8][

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