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Sheraton 2 buzz (everything has been tried)


BryanFoFyan

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i have this incredible buzzing, rattling on the LOW E string of the guitar. its mainly the first couple frets. ive tried everything and nothing has worked. i adjusted the neck, adjusted the bridge, and even replaced the nut, and nothing will make this buzzing go away. as i live in an apartment and cant crank my amp. i actually hear the buzz over my amp its that bad. any ideas???

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When you replaced the nut, did you go for a pre-cut version, or did you make it from a blank?

If it was pre-cut it may have been cut too low from the start.

One quick way to check to see if it is too low, is to put a capo in between the 3rd and 4th frets, and see if there is any clearance in between the string and the 1st fret. There should be 4-6 thousandths.

If there is enough clearance there, then you could have a high fret.

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When you replaced the nut, did you go for a pre-cut version, or did you make it from a blank?

If it was pre-cut it may have been cut too low from the start.

One quick way to check to see if it is too low, is to put a capo in between the 3rd and 4th frets, and see if there is any clearance in between the string and the 1st fret. There should be 4-6 thousandths.

If there is enough clearance there, then you could have a high fret.

 

 

the old nut was either cut low or worn. the new nut is much better. i think that fixed buzzing in the first few frets now that i played with it some. but i found that with the action super high the buzz is virtually completely gone. and with the action low it buzzez no matter what the neck is set as.

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Gordy and Bigneil have given you good input.

A couple of things do come to mind:

 

1.What is your neck deflection set at?

 

2.What gauge strings are you using? Although this is a minor matter, heavier strings are more resonant and can require slightly more clearance.

 

3.Checking string clearance: Gordy gave you one way. Here are a couple of links from Animalfarm's DIY that also deal with it:

http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/String_action_and_setup/i-1811.html

http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/Nuts,_saddles/a-nuts.html

(a credit card or 6" metal engineer's rule can act as a straight edge)

 

As for me, I usually press on the first fret space so that the string contacts the first fret. I then measure the space over the second fret wire and (as Gordy mentioned) add my tolerance to that. (just make sure that your bridge height is set properly)

 

4.Check fret levels:(you can use a credit card as a fret rocker)

Although the neck should normally be straight for this, most neck deflection takes place in the middle of the neck.

Consequently, you should be able to do a "preliminary" check on the first few frets even when guitar is set up.

 

Place edge of credit card over three frets at a time and see if it "rocks". Check several spots across fret (especially where it is buzzing). Check the fist few frets. If it does rock, a more accurate check (no string tension and straight neck) might be advisable.

If this indicates a high fret there may be a couple of possibilities:

(A) Fret may have risen slightly and need to be reseated. (no biggy but, I would not do it myself if I were not sure what I was doing)

(B)You may have a high fret which might need a slight dressing. (Again depending on your tools and level of expertise.)

 

...One last point. If the card does not rock over frets 2, 3,and 4 they may be level. If then, it does not rock over 1, 2 and 3 check to see if there is a gap under the credit card on second fret. This would indicate a high 1st fret.

 

Hope this is of some help. If you are already aware of all this, maybe it will help others.

 

Willy

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size 10 strings. and if i play lightly it has no buzz but im usually an agressive player. took it to a tech and he said frets were fine. barely any use in them.

That's not a sufficient answer - fresh frets doesn't mean the fretboard is properly filed and dressed.

 

Is this tech an actual luthier, or just a set-up guy?

 

Also, just my $.02, but if you play aggressively you may want to accept a higher action and heavier string gauges.

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That's not a sufficient answer - fresh frets doesn't mean the fretboard is properly filed and dressed.

 

Is this tech an actual luthier, or just a set-up guy?

 

Also, just my $.02, but if you play aggressively you may want to accept a higher action and heavier string gauges.

 

what would u suggest 11's-12's?

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Bryan,

 

All good advice above; I'll add, if the buzzing is only on the low E first couple of frets it could be frequency-related rather than fret related. That is, there might be something loose which resonates at those low frequencies. Main culprit on tuneamatic-equipped guitars is the saddle screw. There are two or three ways to fix this. First method, check your intonation is correct and the screw is tight then put a drop of Loctite thread adhesive on the thread of the screw at the saddle. Second method, bend the retaining wire so that it is securely contacting the neck of the screw. If you've not done this before, be careful. I put a pad under the bridge to protect to guitar top, then push down either side of the screw on the wire with a pair of flat head screwdrivers. You will possibly need to repeat this for each screw. Third method, replace the bridge.

 

Other culprits could be a loose tuner post or button. You said you had adjusted the neck so I assume that you meant the truss rod, as a loose truss rod adjusting nut can cause the same symptoms.

 

Did you take the guitar to the tech to find the source of the buzz or just to check the frets? A good tech should be able to find the source of a buzz. As you might gather from the replies above, a keen amateur should be able to find it so anyone in business as a tech should. Or rule out technical problems and advise as to whether you need to consider changing action/string gauge/ playing style.

 

Let us know how you get on.

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Have you checked for a hump in the fretboard near the neck / body joint? This could be your problem ( I hope not )and would cause you to not be able to easily get rid of the buzz. Also, maybe the guitar needs the frets leveled. It isn't unheard of that even new guitars have uneven frets. If your neck has the hump I mentioned before, here's a setup that may make it playable until, if ever, you decide to have it repaired......Set the neck dead straight ( the section that is free from the body and heel of the neck), add only a very tiny amount of relief,if any, and set your string height around 2.5 to 3/32 at the 12th fret. Give it a try before you pay someone else to mess with your guitar. Keep in mind that the truss rod will only affect buzzing on roughly the first 5 to 7 frets, and that if it is buzzing alot on higher frets, you have too much relief or too low of a string height.

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I recently purchased a used G400. I took it to my tech to get a set up done as I always do with my guitars. When I went to pick it up he said the guitar needed a Fret level to get it to spec. With the action as low as I like, it buzzes like crazy. This guy does everythig on a set up including nut filing if required and he even oils the fret board. He knows what I like and he said the levelling will fix it. I will be droppong it off this week. I tried to tweek it myself but the only option with this one is to make it slide guitar LOL.

I had a similar issue a couple of years ago with a brand new Vintage Icon Goldtop. After the fret level is it one of my best playing guitars.

It is amazing how much just a 64th of an inch on a fret will make a difference.

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That's not a sufficient answer - fresh frets doesn't mean the fretboard is properly filed and dressed.

 

Is this tech an actual luthier, or just a set-up guy?

 

Also, just my $.02, but if you play aggressively you may want to accept a higher action and heavier string gauges.

 

 

I will custom manufacture nuts from blanks and set specific strings to different heights for different players. I have set the low E and the other wound strings higher for aggressive play, and not all strings must be set at the same height at the string seating edge on the nut. I keep mine set at .025 from string bottom to the top of the first fret on wound strings. Because the string tension is lower on the thicker, and other wound strings, they will tend to oscillate in a wider range, thus they need a little more clearance on the first fret to prevent buzz.

 

I typically get players who complain about the G string giving trouble at the 12th-15th fret, because the bridge is set low to bring the B and high E closer to the lower neck frets for speedy play. I will often file the bridge saddles for the B and E to drop those strings on the lower part of the neck, whilst being able to keep the G clearance slightly higher to stop the problems with that thicker unwound string from contacting the frets in the mid to lower part of the neck.

 

These methods do tend to change the "flatness" of the top of each string (in comparison to one another), but most folks I've found are more concerned with the clearance on the bottom of the string to the fret top than the "levelness" of the string tops.

 

You don't have to set all your strings up at one specific height. Many pro's don't do that for good reason. You don't have to set high overall action to cope with your strumming style. It can be remedied with a knowledgable luthier and some specialized setup methods. (Oh, and the $$$ to pay for that pro to do it! [tongue] )

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