Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

For you Beatles fans


NeoConMan

Recommended Posts

Ringo's drumming style during the early years of the Beatles is completely misunderstood and lost on the Rock & Roll Generation. What he was playing was intricate percussion riffs on a trap kit. I don't think anyone will argue that Ringo was a GREAT drummer, but he was one heck of a percussionist.

 

What most people think of as great R&R drumming (which I call "stompfoot drumming") would have never worked in the early Beatles. Can you imagine "Please, Please Me" or "In My Life" with Keith Moon on drums. Again I think you have to give George Martin some credit here for realizing what these songs needed were more of a jazz percussion feel.

 

And while we're on Ringo, a few years ago I heard a Beatles trivia question: Since the breakup of the Beatles, which one of them has had the most "hit" songs................RINGO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ringo is a great drummer, in one respect, at least. He was, like George's guitar playing, "perfect,"

for what they did/needed. Never too much, nor too little! Tasty! And, IMHO...a lot better drummer,

than he was allowed, or given credit for, by way too many.

 

As far as John's remark(s)...one has to take those, with a "grain," given his sense of humor,

and loving to put people on. He, or the rest of them, could have had anyone they wanted, even

in the early days. They chose, and kept, Ringo!

 

;>)

 

CB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't remember where I read it, but before Ringo was in the Beatles, and they were "checking the competition" they knew the band Ringo was in at the time. Harrison is reported to have said something to the effect of "the only guy in that group worth a damn is the drummer", hence, when the opening was available... Or so the story goes! :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

slightly off topic, but I just finished reading Peter Doggett's book "You Never Give Me Your Money : The Beatles After the Breakup"

 

extremely interesting, if only for the way the 4 treated each other and themselves after 1969... i take books like this with a grain of salt, but i could not put this one down.

 

Don

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And while we're on Ringo, a few years ago I heard a Beatles trivia question: Since the breakup of the Beatles, which one of them has had the most "hit" songs................RINGO.

 

This was true up to a point in the mid seventies when Ringo had a series of top ten records including It Don't Come Easy, Back Off Boogaloo, Photograph, She's Sixteen and Oh My My.

 

Paul soon flew past him with Wings and his solo stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also like Ringo's drumming. Especially on "Strawberry Fields".

 

But I did one read a quote supposedly from John Lennon. When someone asked John if Ringo was the best drummer in the world, he said "Ringo isn't even the best drummer in The Beatles!" [lol]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

slightly off topic, but I just finished reading Peter Doggett's book "You Never Give Me Your Money : The Beatles After the Breakup"

 

extremely interesting, if only for the way the 4 treated each other and themselves after 1969... i take books like this with a grain of salt, but i could not put this one down.

 

Don

 

Yeah read that one last year. Pretty entertaining stuff. Much of it I've read in other books about their individual lives but this one pulls it all together.

Many would be surprised that they all still communicated and could be great friends as long as business wasn't being discussed.msp_thumbup.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again I think you have to give George Martin some credit here for realizing what these songs needed were more of a jazz percussion feel.

 

 

Hi Larry,

 

George Martin did not like The Beatles original drummer, Pete Best for the reasons you discusses, however George wasn't the one to bring in Ringo. When George started working with The Beatles he insisted that Pete must go and he brought in a session drummer, I believe his name was Andy White. I may have his name wrong. It was Brian Epstein and the other three that insisted on Ringo. It's my understanding that the session drummer performed on the first few studio recordings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Larry,

 

George Martin did not like The Beatles original drummer, Pete Best for the reasons you discusses, however George wasn't the one to bring in Ringo. When George started working with The Beatles he insisted that Pete must go and he brought in a session drummer, I believe his name was Andy White. I may have his name wrong. It was Brian Epstein and the other three that insisted on Ringo. It's my understanding that the session drummer performed on the first few studio recordings.

 

 

here ya go....

  • The Beatles first recorded it on 6 June 1962 with Pete Best on drums, as part of their audition at EMI Studios at 3 Abbey Road, London. This version (previously thought to be lost) is available on Anthology 1.
  • By 4 September, Best had been replaced with Ringo Starr (producer George Martin did not approve of Best's drumming; the decision to fire Best was not his however), and on that day the Beatles with Starr recorded a version again at EMI Studios.
  • One week later, on 11 September, the Beatles returned to the same studio and they made a recording of "Love Me Do" with session drummer Andy White on drums, as Martin was unhappy with Starr's performance on 4 September and he was relegated to playing tambourine. As the tambourine was not included on the 4 September recording, this is the easiest way to distinguish between the Starr and White recordings.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...