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Jeffvisca

laminate tops bodies and sides??

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Good evening everyone,just an observation,but im curious,gibson is coming out with many es335's 345, 1963 es335 reissues etc,and they all seem to have laminated bodies sides and tops. Aside for the cs356 which is allsolid wood,why is gibson moving into the laminates? call me old fashioned,but I love the sound of an all wood guitar as it ages,looking for feed back,thanks! Jeff

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I think all the 'laminate' guitars mentioned have always been laminated from inception

Additionally the ES175....

 

There is an old saying....'A good laminated guitar is better than a poor solid wood guitar'

 

V

 

:-({|=

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... gibson is coming out with many es335's 345, 1963 es335 reissues etc, and they all seem to have laminated bodies sides and tops. Aside for the cs356 which is all solid wood, why is gibson moving into the laminates? call me old fashioned, but I love the sound of an all wood guitar as it ages, looking for feed back...

 

[confused]. . . [blink]

 

 

I think all the 'laminate' guitars mentioned have always been laminated from inception . . Additionally the ES175.... ...

 

+1

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One advantage, I'd guess, to the laminate on an archtop is that one can form it as opposed to carving it. Carving may be easier nowadays, perhaps, with some sort of specialized computer-aided machinery, but...

 

The laminates have done pretty well for decades. I can see some advantages and disadvantages.

 

Actually I'm not sure how much tonal difference one might get especially on a semi with the wood block down the middle with laminate versus carved solid. A laminate may be less likely for feedback. With aging on a flat top apparently a laminate changes tonal qualities less, which may have some advantages as well as disadvantages. It's far less likely to crack with age for obvious reasons.

 

On the other hand, the solid wood does apparently "improve" in tonality with age, at least on flat tops. I've never heard anyone discuss pro or con of aging for a solid top on a hollowbody or semi-hollow designed specifically for electric guitar work.

 

L5Larry probably could chime in on that one with a lot more experience and knowledge than I can claim.

 

There are plenty of laminated Gibsons and other high quality guitars of similar quality build more than a half century old that are doing fine. My 1970s version does fine, for example, although I can see a bit of the effect of aging on the wood at various places. Still, I've seen supposedly "new" guitars in stores that look harder-used.

 

m

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From what I understand, the laminated electric guitars are less prone to feedback then the carved guitars. I've never played a carved electric guitar, so I wouldn't know first hand. As a woodworker though, I do know that laminated wood is much more stable then solid wood, so it would be less susceptible to humidity changes.

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You need to try a cs356, and than you'll understand the difference. Both types are fine guitars, but I'd buy my 356 again in a heartbeat. the smooth tone that the guitar has is first class and that translates into overdriven very nicely. The 356 is like 1/2 335 & 1/2 LP very nice combo.

great all around player. Yes it's abit over done in the looks dept. but at the core is a fine guitar.(that's not really a complaint) I like it just the way it is. And I've seen some great lookers here.

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I think the carved solid wood guitars resonate a little more. They sound more like a Les Paul through the amp - a clear ringing kind of sound. They're kind of creamy when they distort. The plywood guitars have a flatter sound and that translates into a more woody tone through the amplifier. They get gritty when they distort.

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