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23 minutes ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

I just listened to that. Damn funny. Who doesn't like good head?

They famously played with GG for a while and recorded "Tough fxxking shxt" (great song!) and "Slxts in the city" with him. Also on Spotify. 

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2 minutes ago, Pinch said:

They famously played with GG for a while and recorded "Tough fxxking shxt" (great song!) and "Slxts in the city" with him. Also on Spotify. 

G. G. was a loose cannon.

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3 hours ago, Whitefang said:

Maybe he should have tried listening to it sober.....?  [cool]

I wonder.... first;

Who IS this "advanced classical composer" and...

What has he ever composed?    and

How does it make him any authority on anything?

Sepiatone

I would tend to think of him as classical snob that though Rock was beneath him, but was genuinely surprised at how all of the complex parts of "Close To The Edge" came together and worked.

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40 minutes ago, mihcmac said:

I would tend to think of him as classical snob that though Rock was beneath him, but was genuinely surprised at how all of the complex parts of "Close To The Edge" came together and worked.

That is THE classic of all classic Prog Rock albums. Relayer is the business too.

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
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2 hours ago, Mr. Natural said:

The Live Adventures Of Mike Bloomfield And Al Kooper

Been a fave of mine long time.  [wink]   Wouldn't mind having an 8x10 print of that Norman Rockwell cover.

1 hour ago, merciful-evans said:

Tchaikovsky 2nd Symphony 4th movement (also reading his biography).

Good listening.  But tragic story.  [sad]

Whitefang

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23 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

That is THE classic of all classic Prog Rock albums. Relayer is the business too.

Yes was more than progressive, I think, creating antagonistic components and making them sound like they belonged together. The early Prog's like Captain Beefheart, Zappa, Arthur Brown, Soft Machine, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Dream Theater to name few, I should include Todd in there as well, all went to different extremes experimenting on breaking the rules and making it work.  🙂

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1 hour ago, mihcmac said:

Yes was more than progressive, I think, creating antagonistic components and making them sound like they belonged together. The early Prog's like Captain Beefheart, Zappa, Arthur Brown, Soft Machine, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Dream Theater to name few, I should include Todd in there as well, all went to different extremes experimenting on breaking the rules and making it work.  🙂

When Todd puts his mind to it he can do anything. He unfortunately has so much stuff that makes me go WTF Todd. I guess this is for you and your 5000 devoted super loyal fans that will tolerate anything you do. The first five or six Todd albums were killer. Then it was hit and miss. Same with Utopia. He make great ones like Opps . . . Wrong Planet and then  awful stuff like Ra, or hey lets do a total Beatles parody album. 

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
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25 minutes ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

When Todd puts his mind to it he can do anything. He unfortunately has so much stuff that makes me go WTF Todd. I guess this is for you and your 5000 devoted super loyal fans that will tolerate anything you do. The first five or Six Todd albums were killer. Then it was hit and miss. Same with Utopia. He make great ones like Opps . . . Wrong Planet and then stuff I can do stuff like Ra, or hey lets do a total Beatles parody album. 

Todd does some unusual things that can make you scratch your head, but thats the point. It kind of reminds me of the first time I went to a Crimson concert, Robin Trower opened for them, after Crimson started to play the Trower fans started to leave.

Fortunately for me, I like both sides of the coin...

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2 hours ago, Mr. Natural said:

Yeah, me too.  Live Adventures... AND Super Session.

Ah, yes.  "Super Session".   It was the most coveted LP (in my "neckka" )  when it came out.  Most of the "counterculture" were familiar with Kooper and Bloomfield from their  work with Bob Dylan along with Kooper's newly formed Blood Sweat and Tears and of course, Bloomfield's work with Paul Butterfield.   And in the pre FM rock station days, we all dug Stills and that cool Buffalo Springfield tune. [wink]

20 hours ago, mihcmac said:

Yes was more than progressive, I think, creating antagonistic components and making them sound like they belonged together. The early Prog's like Captain Beefheart, Zappa, Arthur Brown, Soft Machine, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Dream Theater to name few, I should include Todd in there as well, all went to different extremes experimenting on breaking the rules and making it work.  🙂

I never thought of Zappa as "prog" (echh, hate that abbreviation)  but more as "advanced" or Avant-Garde"  and off the left field wall.  [wink]   Arthur Brown to me, came off as just a novelty  and I have no idea what Beefheart was trying to do.  Just never was my "cuppa".  And as for early  progressive-rock bands, I wonder why you failed to mention THE NICE.  [wink]  And the genre was more attempts to blend rock, jazz and some classical components into one mix.  And YES was one of the bands that boasted not only a gathering of excellent musicians, but equally excellent composition, instrumentation and lyrical quality instead of just resting on the laurels of studio tricks.   I didn't find any of their work (up until "Topographic Oceans")  to be "antagonistic".  I guess another that could be tacked to that bunch would be  Brian Auger and the Trinity.

Whitefang

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3 hours ago, Whitefang said:

Ah, yes.  "Super Session".   It was the most coveted LP (in my "neckka" )  when it came out.  Most of the "counterculture" were familiar with Kooper and Bloomfield from their  work with Bob Dylan along with Kooper's newly formed Blood Sweat and Tears and of course, Bloomfield's work with Paul Butterfield.   And in the pre FM rock station days, we all dug Stills and that cool Buffalo Springfield tune. [wink]

I never thought of Zappa as "prog" (echh, hate that abbreviation)  but more as "advanced" or Avant-Garde"  and off the left field wall.  [wink]   Arthur Brown to me, came off as just a novelty  and I have no idea what Beefheart was trying to do.  Just never was my "cuppa".  And as for early  progressive-rock bands, I wonder why you failed to mention THE NICE.  [wink]  And the genre was more attempts to blend rock, jazz and some classical components into one mix.  And YES was one of the bands that boasted not only a gathering of excellent musicians, but equally excellent composition, instrumentation and lyrical quality instead of just resting on the laurels of studio tricks.   I didn't find any of their work (up until "Topographic Oceans")  to be "antagonistic".  I guess another that could be tacked to that bunch would be  Brian Auger and the Trinity.

Whitefang

I don't think there is a single term that will cover the progressive advanced avant-guarde fusion jazz-rock groups that really fits, can't put them all into one box and they tend to be very different. There are so many of them that perhaps a another way to describe them like "Groups Whose Music Cover Bands Do Not Play". Anyway, this started with examining the components of a 16 minute song that theoretically shouldn't have gotten air time, but did. "Close To The Edge" got time on the air outside of album hour and continued to amaze us.. 🙂

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There is a reissue CD of "Super Session" with extra tracks.  Some great Bloomfield on it.

And on Spotify there is a lot of Bloomfield I hadn't heard before, including the rest of "Live Adventures of" and lots more.

Listening to trumpeter Donald Byrd earlier, one of those Blue Note boxes with all the albums on.  He did the 1st version of "Cristo Redentor".

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22 hours ago, Whitefang said:

I never thought of Zappa as "prog" (echh, hate that abbreviation)  but more as "advanced" or Avant-Garde"  and off the left field wall. .

Whitefang

The only way to describe Zappa's music is it's Zappa. But Avant-Garde could definitely be used for a lot of the early stuff.  Who else would write a song about harvesting dental floss in Montana on a tiny horse, with Zircon encrusted tweezers?

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/10/2021 at 9:32 AM, Sgt. Pepper said:

The only way to describe Zappa's music is it's Zappa. But Avant-Garde could definitely be used for a lot of the early stuff.  Who else would write a song about harvesting dental floss in Montana on a tiny horse, with Zircon encrusted tweezers?

No doubt, the same guy who'd sing about a girl named "Suzy Creamcheese" ,  Hungry Freaks  and the Brain Police.  [wink]

Whitefang

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