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tail piece


bill67

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There is no Yes or No answer to this......it is subjective to individual opinion. You can try it and see if you hear a noticeable change in tone. I think it would matter more on how solidly the tail piece is attached to the instrument for good vibration transfer.....but going on this same train of thought, a higher density material should transfer vibration better than something like pot metal.....If you are curious, it would be worth buying another tail piece and at least trying it :D

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There is no Yes or No answer to this......it is subjective to individual opinion. You can try it and see if you hear a noticeable change in tone. I think it would matter more on how solidly the tail piece is attached to the instrument for good vibration transfer.....but going on this same train of thought, a higher density material should transfer vibration better than something like pot metal.....If you are curious, it would be worth buying another tail piece and at least trying it :D

 

I am in the strat-o-steve camp.

 

Red 333

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It probably does affect tone, but not like a heavy pin bridge. The strings below the saddles are free to vibrate in sympathy with the played strings. The degree of vibration would be affected by the mass of the tail piece. While the shortness of the string length between the saddles and tail piece, compared to the above the saddles length means they don't sing as loudly.

 

Some musicians, violinists, and mandoliners say they hear these vibrations. There are various patent mufflers which can be purchased to silence these short ends. Homeopathic remedies include wedging appropriate sized rubber grommets between the strings or threading yarn up and down between the strings. I think the tones the musicians hear are called "Wolf Tones". Whether or not the audience can hear them, I don't know. Microphones may pick them up.

 

Then again, it could be these 'Wolf Tones', or whatever they are called, are what gives arch top guitars their characteristic voice.

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I've changed a couple of 'em on older archtops in my "olden days."

 

Frankly the changes were for cosmetic reasons. I think there's a lot more going on in the bridge and its material and its "connection" to the top that is the major variable excluding string choice. Even that might bring some question, depending.

 

The specific strings first, then bridge... are far more likely to bring out tone variables I can hear, anyway, IMHO.

 

m

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Interesting post. I must admit that I know little about this, but I've read that frequensator tailpieces do actually make a difference, having to do with length of string between the bridge and tailpiece. That some have actually reversed the sections to change the string's "response". Is this wrong information? Just curious.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I guess I can't answer the question about some types of tailpieces. But frankly I think the bridge remains the major option for sound quality. On one guitar I've used wood, solid metal and a tunomatic type. The metal versions obviously make the greater diff.

 

m

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