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10s on a J45 ?

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anyone use 10 gauge strings on your J45 ? I joined this forum to get some opinions. I have been using 11s on it since I got it new last year and a friend made a funny face when I told him I use 11s and said to try 10s.

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I would suggest go for 13's, you will be amazed how much nore powerful it will sound. 10' or 11's imo just don't bring out the full potential of the guitar.

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I think you'll find 10's a little thin

 

10s wont provide the tension needed to optimally drive your top. And top movement is how acoustics get their tone. I wouldnt go there, unless you play plugged all the time and need to Bend it like Eric. Also, they wont hold pitch for the same reason.

 

 

point of reference, in acoustic-world, 12s are standard lights, 13s are mediums

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.

No .10s

 

.11s would be a bit thin.

 

.12s is a starting point for jumbos.

 

.13s would be the best for jumbos, if you can get used to them. . . . Grow those calluses. B)

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My brother uses 10's on his Epi masterbuilt DR-500MCE. Of course that's mostly because he wants to play lead/bend a lot and plays plugged in most of the time with his band.

 

I wouldn't go less than 12's on a strummer if I were you unless you are a noob with still sensitive fingers. Of course a noob with a J-45 is pretty rare lol

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You can play whatever gauge you want because it is your guitar. But the only dreadnaught flattop I ever used ultra-light strings--I'd call 10s that--on was an old Hummingbird that had some issues, and that was only until I got the issues resolved. Heck, I use 12s on my LG-2 and had 13s on it for awhile.

 

If you play it only through a pickup/PA or whatever then it doesn't matter much. But acoustically, J-45s typically like a heavier string to drive the top. I find Medium 13s best on a J-45 that's set-up well at all & if I were playing 11s and wanted to experiment, I'd start w. 12s, not 10s. I have messed around w. a truck load of guitars & strings over the years and I've never seen a dread that sounded better w. 12s but some people love 'em and would disagree. So be it.

 

Up to you, just my experience.

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I've found that 12's (lights) hit the sweet spot on my J-50 (which is a J-45 without the sunburst finish). I've tried 13's (mediums) and "bluegrass" (light/medium) strings on it several times, but the tone just isn't the same. The tone is more robust with heavier strings, but that magic Gibson sound isn't there like it is with the lights. On the other hand, I had a Martin D-18V that sounded positively anemic with lights, but great with mediums. Others say that lights work well on a Martin D-35, so I guess it all depends on the guitar personal preference.

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hey thanks for all the replies, I won't be going with 10s but I am kinda hesitant to try the 12s I have Pyramid 11s on it now, maybe I can find some cheap 12s just to try them out. I got Pyramids on it now but I like the Gibson j200 strings best and will stick with them in the future. I thank all you guys for the tips.

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The "stock" strings on a new J-45 are Masterbuilt Premium Phosphor Bronze, .012-.053. I also use these on my 1950 J-45, and they project very well, and really bring out the best in an instrument that has fully opened up. There's no reason to go to lighter strings unless you are sitting in a small room playing for yourself, but in doing so you'll miss out on the best tonal qualities of the J-45. I used 11's on this old J-45 for some time to ease the load on it, and was startled at the change in character when going up to .012's. I used 13's on it back in the 60's, but wouldn't do that today, except perhaps on a newer instrument that is still pretty tight tonally, and needs a bit of extra drive. I do use 10's on my two ES 335's, but with an electric you're using the pickups to generate 95% of the tone and volume. It's hard to get even a 50-year-old piece of maple plywood to vibrate very much compared to the spruce top of the J-45!

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