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Gibson Quality Control???


Acousticologist

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Never mind little glue globs, how does it SOUND?

 

I don't concern myself with the under-the-hood cosmetics near as much as I do with regard to tone and playability, as well as, how are cosmetics outside the hood. [biggrin]

 

Fred

 

 

I'm all for the feel and sound. but there's been a lot of talk about QC checks here on the forum. Before reading about it, I would never have noticed.

 

Just seems to stand out at a time that I've been reading about minor finish issues etc

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You're bound to get a wide variety of opinions on this, but those sloppy glue spots would bug me (at least you've got a matching set!). That said, tone & playability should be the final decision maker. If the guitar puts a significant smile on your face in those critical areas, it's probably worth keeping because the next sample might be worse in overall build quality.

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I think Fred's got it right. Many of the guitars I have owned have had what might be referred to as an interior cosmetic defect. AKA glue run. My 58 CW almost gives the impression of being dipped in a vat but as for SOUND she has no equal in my mind. Unless it's destined for the luthier's hall of fame.....better a small run than a loose joint.

If I had a macro lens I would post a shot of the gibby, Cardiac Arrest! Good thing I didn't share on OWF's thread regarding weight. Anybody else own an eight lb. CW lol [rolleyes]

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... My 58 CW almost gives the impression of being dipped in a vat [of glue] but as for SOUND she has no equal in my mind. ... Good thing I didn't share on OWF's thread regarding weight. Anybody else own an eight lb. CW ...

 

Apparently, all that glue adds up on the scale. . . . [lol]

 

 

 

Acousticologist -

 

I was one of the members a bit harder on Gibson for finish flaws, but this wouldn't set me off. Yes, that should've been wiped, but not that critical for me - I wouldn't have anything to say on that one. Well . . . maybe - if it was like Fred's - an extra few onces of glue all over.

 

Now that batterpack - that indicates to me something wasn't secured like it should've been and I would be wondering if the wires were dangling or secured - so my mirror would be in there and depending on what I found - I might have something to say about that.

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Ever look inside a Banner-era Gibson? More glue drips than the Elmer's factory. I don't like to see drips either, but have tried to adjust my thinking to keep it in perspective when I like how the instrument sounds.

 

Red 333

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Finish issues, glue spots, loose pickguards: iit has become part of the Gibson emotion for me. Just like Italian cars. If I want an Audi guitar, I buy a Martin (which I will). But if I want emotion, I grab my Hummingbird with all its flaws.

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Ever look inside a Banner-era Gibson? More glue drips than the Elmer's factory. ...

 

I think the "Only A Gibson Is Glued Enough" joke goes all the back to the banner era. (The glue drips go back even farther -- my '30's models have plenty too.)

 

-- Bob R

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man I wish Gibson would treat Epiphone better. Not a single one of the four Epi's I own, nor my brothers' Masterbilt have a SINGLE extraneous glue drip! Is there a luthier I can send it to to get the Gibson-style glue drips added to my Epi's?

 

[flapper]

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I've got glue spots inside my SJ-300 they don't bother me much, I could always sand them out myself. It's the 6" long ripple in the back that makes me sad. Not sure if it's the finish or the wood. First SJ-300 they sent to me had a huge dent in the front so I felt a lot of pressure to take this one. Wouldn't do that today but I was stupid in '06. Can't really see it too much in this pic but in person it would bug probably everyone on this board. We are after all talking about a $5,901 (MSRP) dollar guitar.

tn-2.jpg

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man I wish Gibson would treat Epiphone better. Not a single one of the four Epi's I own, nor my brothers' Masterbilt have a SINGLE extraneous glue drip! Is there a luthier I can send it to to get the Gibson-style glue drips added to my Epi's?

 

[flapper]

 

Use a mirror to inspect underneath the top! I have six Epiphone acoustics (including four Masterbilts) plus four Epiphone Elitist acoustics (made in Japan). Only the Elitists have no extraneous glue when a mirror is used to look under the top, where you normally could not see(the Japanese justly deserve their reputation for attention to detail). My EL 00's top looks like it was put together by a third grader, but it's a lovable little box anyway.

 

Red 333

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Get a grip! My 1948 J-45 has quite a few drips on the inside, and it doesn't effect the sound in any way. If you look carefully, what you're seeing is glue squeeze-out where the ends of the braces tuck into notches in the kerfing. If you own this quitar for a long time, you'll be grateful for some glue at that critical joint. It helps keep the whole thing tied together. Take a look at the top bracing on old Gibsons, with fabric overlaying the X-brace joints, etc. Not too neat but the guitars are still holding together, sometimes despite decades of abuse. And they can sound real, real good.

 

I think the obsession we're seeing with some finishing details--or lack thereof--is getting out of control. Do I wish these were better? Sure, who doesn't want perfect. But you aren't paying for a showpiece to hang on the wall: you're paying for a guitar you can play, and play for years.

 

Holy cow!

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Get a grip! ... Holy cow!

 

You might actually follow your own advice.

 

Tolerance for these kinds of issues is not universally the same, regardless of the guitar building techniques used.

 

But as I posted earlier, this kind of thing wouldn't bother me.

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You might actually follow your own advice.

 

Tolerance for these kinds of issues is not universally the same, regardless of the guitar building techniques used.

 

But as I posted earlier, this kind of thing wouldn't bother me.

 

+1 on all counts.

 

I, for one, don't have O-scopes for ears and therefore can't say what does or does not affect sound "in any way."

 

But what the heck, I'll post on a forum anyway,

 

Just like everyone else.

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Ah, no big deal ... its part of the 'hand made' deal, everyone's different ..

 

Not a big deal, I agree. It warms my hear to look into a guitar and see immaculate workmanship. But I don't consider a drip like that as a big deal. On the other hand, I disagree that it's part of the 'hand made' deal. In my experience, the more 'hand made' a guitar is, the less likely it is to have issues of this sort. I have a single-builder guitar, a couple of boutique guitars, and a couple of factory guitars. Although none of them have visible glue drips like the one pictured, the overall neatness of the interior is best on the handmade, a close second on the boutique (small shops with a handful of employees), and somewhat less outstanding but still very good on the couple or three factory guitars I have. A production line setting is exactly the atmosphere in which taking the time to wipe up a drip might be a problem because it can slow down the whole line. In a small shop, each worker sets his or her own pace (within reason) and is not very likely to miss a drip like that and extremely unlikely to ignore it once noticed.

 

But, again, I don't consider a drip of the sort shown to be a flaw of any sort. It may signal a more hurried assembly process but it's not a consequence I care about or woud give much thought. Like I said, I'm favorably impressed by a really clean interior but not bummed in any way when a factory guitar has the odd stray drip inside, as long as everything in there is working properly.

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My brand new J45 that I bought in November was almost flawless looking, except for a couple of very, very small glue drops like yours!

 

I am usually pretty good to my guitars, but Friday as I was taking it out of the case, I turned around and hit a internal wall corner and put a big DING!!!! in the bottom front left binding!

 

I can't believe it...

 

Regards BK.

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Quality Control?....I don,t think it's anywhere near what it "used to be".... in the USA or

elsewhere these days!

Just my opinion! Call me a miserable man...I don,t care!

A drip or two, ain't no big deal though. Maybe it was built on a Monday!

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