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FT- 145 need info please!


ShakeZoolaGFX

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i Recently found my FT-145 hasnt been played in over 10 years unfortunatly.

I was looking to Sell it to an owner that would love it and play it.

So i was wondering if you guys could give me some Background Info On it like current retail, possible sale price for mine, any info i should know.

Here are some picturespost-31957-010617700 1300925180_thumb.jpgpost-31957-041427500 1300925290_thumb.jpg

2q8wujb.jpg

2by51w.jpg

1e9ao4.jpg

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Repost this over on the Epiphone Acoustic board. (I've asked the mod-squad to move it.) This is a very common Norlin era Epiphone. Looks like '77 - '80 or so.

 

Value depends upon the condition of the neck block. By the time this one was made, they'd licked a weak neck block issue, but some still fail. In the down-the-neck view, it appears to be okay. Can you get a close-up side view of the fingerboard over the soundboard and the fretboard extension? How high is the action over the 12th fret?

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Shake these were made betweeen 72-80 , jumbo style spruce top mahogany back/sides 3 piece adjustable neck and looking at the pic of the down shot looks as if the neck could use a bit of tweeking. These are not very valuable guitars and I would consider ( looking at your pics ) for this to be in the range of what is called a high average (as it looks like a bit of work will be needed).So you would be looking at $100.00 -$150.00 if you found one on E-bay a little higher in stores ( they need to make a profit to, so they would look at around $225.00 or slightly higher.

I hope this helps you out.

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.

Yep.

 

I had a 70s Epi deck cave on me right at the top of the sound hole (end of the fretboard). Nice guitar, but I let her go.

Busted loose neck block.

 

 

 

In your first picture, I was able to blow it up a bit, there appears to be a reflection anomaly just off the fretboard on the sound board. This could indicate a loose neck block. Or, it could just be a weird reflection off the end of the fretboard. I'll need a close-up profile (from the side) of the fretboard over the sound board. Include the fretboard extension where it cantilevers over the sound board.

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  • 2 months later...

Busted loose neck block.

 

 

 

In your first picture, I was able to blow it up a bit, there appears to be a reflection anomaly just off the fretboard on the sound board. This could indicate a loose neck block. Or, it could just be a weird reflection off the end of the fretboard. I'll need a close-up profile (from the side) of the fretboard over the sound board. Include the fretboard extension where it cantilevers over the sound board.

 

if you need more let me know please.

 

Sorry its taken so long have been super busy.

m9vgc6.jpg

 

rvzw51.jpg

 

axk02e.jpg

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I've rotated your pic because it seems easier to see the detail.

 

LooseNeckFT145Lincolnwood.jpg

 

A: The light area appears to be showing a gap between the neck block and neck or a chip off the rib next to the rabbeted out slot for the neck. Not uncommon in loose neck blocks. Could also be a loose neck.

 

B: Notice that the sliver of neck you can see, below the finger board tapers from the button end through to the end of the neck at the back of the neck slot. This should not taper, finger board is not parallel to the sound board. Indicative of a loose neck block. Also indicative of a loose neck.

 

C: White jizz in area of neck/soundboard junction. Evidence of a possible repair attempt.

 

D: Neck ends at about "C". Fingerboard continues and cantilevers over the soundboard towards the sound hole. This is sometimes called a fretboard extension. In this area, it appears the FB extension is contacting the sound board. This also indicates a loose neck block. Look for deformation of the soundhole just beyond the FB extension.

 

Also: action looks high.

 

If the neck sits flush with the top of the pocket of the neck block, I'd say this has a loose neck block which can and should be repaired.

 

Here is my fix:

 

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/37812-repairing-a-norlin-era-ft-guitar-with-broken-neck/page__p__528620__hl__repairing__fromsearch__1#entry528620

 

 

There is a possibility that the light area seen in "A" is the top of the neck block. If this is a gap, then the neck block may be okay, and the four screws holding the neck to the body are pulling out of their holes. The fix is to inject some carpenter's glue into the holes, then stuff the screw holes in the back of the neck with several tooth picks, to tighten up the holes. This is a time honored woodworker's fix for augered out holes.

 

You may need to scrape out any residual glue, shims, sheep dip left by the last fix. the neck should sit flush on the neck block, all the way forward.

 

After the glue dries, shave the tooth picks flush with the bottom of the neck, the re-install the neck.

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I've rotated your pic because it seems easier to see the detail.

 

LooseNeckFT145Lincolnwood.jpg

 

A: The light area appears to be showing a gap between the neck block and neck or a chip off the rib next to the rabbeted out slot for the neck. Not uncommon in loose neck blocks. Could also be a loose neck.

 

B: Notice that the sliver of neck you can see, below the finger board tapers from the button end through to the end of the neck at the back of the neck slot. This should not taper, finger board is not parallel to the sound board. Indicative of a loose neck block. Also indicative of a loose neck.

 

C: White jizz in area of neck/soundboard junction. Evidence of a possible repair attempt.

 

D: Neck ends at about "C". Fingerboard continues and cantilevers over the soundboard towards the sound hole. This is sometimes called a fretboard extension. In this area, it appears the FB extension is contacting the sound board. This also indicates a loose neck block. Look for deformation of the soundhole just beyond the FB extension.

 

Also: action looks high.

 

If the neck sits flush with the top of the pocket of the neck block, I'd say this has a loose neck block which can and should be repaired.

 

Here is my fix:

 

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/37812-repairing-a-norlin-era-ft-guitar-with-broken-neck/page__p__528620__hl__repairing__fromsearch__1#entry528620

 

 

There is a possibility that the light area seen in "A" is the top of the neck block. If this is a gap, then the neck block may be okay, and the four screws holding the neck to the body are pulling out of their holes. The fix is to inject some carpenter's glue into the holes, then stuff the screw holes in the back of the neck with several tooth picks, to tighten up the holes. This is a time honored woodworker's fix for augered out holes.

 

You may need to scrape out any residual glue, shims, sheep dip left by the last fix. the neck should sit flush on the neck block, all the way forward.

 

After the glue dries, shave the tooth picks flush with the bottom of the neck, the re-install the neck.

 

 

Thing is i have been in possession of the guitar the entire time and was Purchased Brand new.

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Thing is i have been in possession of the guitar the entire time and was Purchased Brand new.

 

As has mine. Near as I can remember the neck block busted loose very early on. It had nothing to do with abuse or humidity, or temperature. It had to do with Matsumoku employing an assembly line expedient (bolt on neck) that blew up in their faces. Fender did the same thing to guitars of this era. Fender's fix was a pipe like brace between the neck block and tail button. See:

Look inside the sound hole.

HesterClarkandPalomino.jpg

That's Hester Clark. Roy's daddy.

 

The fix to the Epiphones was to make the neck block wider for more gluing surface between neck block and sound board.

 

I got it mid to late 70's. Took lessons with her right off at the music store where she was purchased. I remember asking the teacher if the neck should move 'like this'? He told me he thought it was fine. [cursing] I knew no better so I let it go at that. The thing wouldn't stay in tune and was hard to play, so I gave up on it for years. I vowed to conquer her some day. At some point I figured out that the neck ought not to move, then, about that time, the brace above the sound hole finally sheared off. Yup, it's busted. But it was years after acquisition. I tried several ways to fix her. I finally hit upon a fairly durable fix.

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