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Opinions on Les Paul Studio 60s Tribute?


IanHenry

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I have taken a fancy to buying one of the new Les Paul Studio 60s Tribute’s to use along side my Classic Antique, mainly because I like the idea of a Les Paul with P90’s, but I read this review, which quite frankly is not very complementary:

 

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/reviews/electric_guitars/gibson/les_paul_studio_60s_tribute/index.html

 

My problem is that I think it unlikely that any retailers near me will stock this guitar.

 

Can any members who own this guitar give their opinions on it? I find it difficult to believe that it is as bad as the reviewer is saying, it looks to me like he is doing a hatchet job on it!

All opinions will be gratefully received.

 

Regards,

Ian.

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I have this guitar in the Gold finish and I am really happy with it. It plays very comfortable and easy, and sounds very good to me.

 

I think many people have different perceptions of what this guitar is supposed to be. It's not a VOS guitar.

It's a very affordable U.S. made Gibson Les Paul, with P90 Pickups. The neck feels great.

The fit on all the parts on my guitar are excellent. It just doesn't have the frills that the higher end Les Paul's have, hence the lower price.

The only thing that I could knock on mine is that the truss rod cover screws were loose but that was easily rectified.

I play mine through a Vox AC15H1TVL and it sounds great. It has that snappy punchy sound that you would expect from a P90 guitar.

 

Cheers,

Ian

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I saw the 50's Tribute come and go last year without being able to get one. But when I saw that they were releasing a 60's Tribute, I knew I'd have a Goldtop. I can honestly say that this is the best guitar that I have bought as of right now. The finish is great because it looks older than it is without looking like it needs a new paint job. I've heard a lot of people complain about various quality issues but I stand by mine. She had a little gunk on the side of the body but nothing that my pick couldn't take off in 5-10 minutes in a couple of different spots.

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It is, what it is! A great looking, sounding, and playing guitar, at a

really decent price point! If you want a trophy piece, with (possibly???)

greater "collector's" value...buy the R-6! If, on the other hand, you

want all that tone, decent build quality, and a outstanding sounding,

and playing, Gibson LP Gold Top (or Cherryburst, Honeyburst, Black or White),

for a very reasonable price...then, try one out. I think you'll enjoy the experience.

I certainly have!

 

DSC_0049.jpg

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I don't have any experience with the 60s tribute, but I do own a 50s which is as far as I know pretty similar apart from the neck.

 

I love the guitar, for it's price it has a great tone, it's easy to play and it looks good. Even a few of my friends who have been playing the guitar for a long time were a bit amazed with her.

 

I also read the review and frankly stopped reading after the sound part. Beside the fact he's constantly repeating himself on the pickups are too hot part, he obviously expected a VOS guitar while this is a tribute to the 60s version of the guitar, not an exact copy.

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Everybody is entitled to their opinion. I purchased a HB 60's tribute about a month ago and love it. It has a great sound, is nice and light and looks great! My only complaint was that it only came with a gig bag. I purchased a case to better protect the guitar. The best advice I could say is for you to get your hands on one and play it for yourself. Let us know what you decide.

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Charlie, those gold tops certainly look nice, and yes Torp, I agree, passing his opinion on the pickups once would have sufficed, but by keep going on about them leaves me with the feeling that the guy’s got a bit of a ***** about it, and maybe an axe to grind!

I think I value the opinions of the people on this forum more than him.

 

Regards,

Ian.

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It is, what it is! A great looking, sounding, and playing guitar, at a

really decent price point! If you want a trophy piece, with (possibly???)

greater "collector's" value...buy the R-6! If, on the other hand, you

want all that tone, decent build quality, and a outstanding sounding,

and playing, Gibson LP Gold Top (or Cherryburst, Honeyburst, Black or White),

for a very reasonable price...then, try one out. I think you'll enjoy the experience.

I certainly have!

 

DSC_0049.jpg

 

VERY NICE!!!

 

Nice to see Gold hat knobs with the silver inserts!!

 

Regards

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but I read this review, which quite frankly is not very complementary:

 

The review was written by one person who didn't like one example of the instrument.

 

He didn't like the sound; he didn't like the looks; he didn't like the finish; he didn't like the fit of the hardware; he didn't think it was as good as an Epiphone guitar he DID like but which he sold.

 

He's just moaning.

 

Ignore him.

 

Totally.

 

He really, really deserves to be ignored.

 

He's an arse.

 

P.

 

EDIT : I feel I have to back up my possibly slightly dismissive statement above...

 

Here's an edited bit of what he says about the sound;

 

"Sound: I will be blunt here; I am giving this a 6/10 because it doesn’t sound good. It doesn’t sound like it should and my point being, these P-90’s are way too hot....I generally look at P-90’s as a pickup that falls somewhere in between the output of single coils and humbuckers. The pickups that Gibson equipped on this guitar are way too HOT for what this guitar is trying to go out and accomplish..."

Is that really true? Well, by way of illustration, here's how hot P-90's are meant to be in relation to other Gibson p-ups;

 

P-90comparisonchart.jpg

"...between the output of single-coils and humbuckers..." ?

 

Leaving aside the obvious point that P-90s are, in fact, single coil; as can be seen; with the exception of a few very hot humbuckers - the ceramics and a couple of 'Artist-endorsed' specials - it is pretty much one of the hottest p-ups in the range - more powerful than all but one of the Burstbuckers, for example.

 

And as far as what Gibson are trying to accomplish with this guitar - how arrogant of him to assume he knows what Gibson were trying to achieve.

 

He goes on to say;

 

"My problem lies with the fact that the old P-90’s weren’t that great. It was laborious to get a great tone out of them; one of the first Les Paul’s that did a good job was the 1956 Goldtop. That not only looked amazing but it also sounded great. If you want to buy one of those you will nearly be spending $4,000usd so we aren’t going to waste our time in an apple and oranges argument."

 

Let's take that one bit at a time.

 

"...the old P-90's weren't that great..."

 

Excuse me?! Exactly how much experience does the writer have of original P-90s? He's talking absolute nonsense. The P-90 is one of the 4 most revered sounds in the history of guitar pick-ups.

 

"...It was laborious to get a great tone out of them..."

 

Well, it's probably been at least, ooh, ten days since I last played a '50s Les Paul with a pair of original P-90s (Cheers, Simon!) but I don't remember having too much trouble in getting them to sing or scream - depending on tone/vol settings.

 

"...one of the first Les Paul’s that did a good job was the 1956 Goldtop..."

 

So how did that differ from the 1952 model - pickup-wise?

 

"...If you want to buy one of those you will nearly be spending $4,000usd..."

 

Errm, if you want to buy one of those "...you will nearly be spending $25,000usd..." would be far more accurate. Perhaps he is meaning the R6, though...

 

The guy's problem is he had an Epi '56 replica and assumes that was exactly what a genuine '56 Gold-Top was meant to be like. The new Tribute isn't the same as his old Epi and he thinks, mistakenly, that Gibson has got it wrong. What he fails to understand is that it was the Epi that wasn't the same as an original '56.

 

His review is only of meaning if you are trying to find a guitar which sounds like his old Epi G-T. Nothing else.

 

IMHO, of course.

 

P.

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I love my "Tributes!"

AND...their P-90's! "Too Hot," or not! LOL

 

 

CB

 

Being In my 'Full-on Rant' mode earlier I forgot to say that I, too, absolutely adore your G-T's, CB!. Sorry for the belated drooling!

 

P.

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I also took the time to browse the review. I have also seen several other reviews dossing the studio 50s and 60s tributes. I have the 50s tribute and I find nothing wrong that a little personal preference adjustments can't fix. These guitars were not made to be lookers, they were made to be players, bringing back the nosalgic sounds of early rock and allowing those of us who can't afford $3000 + guitars to be able to have a name brand guitar of quality. My Studio 50s Tribute is well made, tight joints, nothing loose and great sound. The worn look is the way it's made and I can live with that and knew it up front. I once told someone who asked why I didn't chrome up this and that on my motorcycle that I didn't buy it to look at, I bought it to ride. I have the same opinion as to why I bought a Gibson guitar; I didn't buy it to look at, I bought it to play and it fits that bill very well. It's true a couple that weren't totally up to snuff may have slipped through quality control but that is always a risk in the production of a product. Personally, I think most of the dissing of the Studio Tributes is because some folks expected more than they got (which can happen buying on-line or sight unseen) or were not familiar with the old sounds the P 90s made famous.

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those goldtops are indeed the cat's meow. I'm not a huge fan of satin finish, but I've been thinking about these nonetheless and I've owned a couple guitars fromt he "faded" series so I know what to expect. That said, I've seen some ESP's locally that seemed just as dull and satiny for like twice the price anyway.

 

I think that yes, the reviewer may have gotten "tribute" as used in the marketing of the product confused with the conept of a "reissue." It definitely seemed like he didn't understand or want to understand what you get at that price point. As far as the sound, I dunno, you either like it or you don't. I really dig P-90's and I can't personally imagine having to struggle to get a good sound out of a set of them.

 

On and off though, participants on that site in general has had bouts of bashing anything and everything gibson in the past just as a general attitude. There is a LOT of restating hearsay and I heard it form a firend of a friend kinda stuff on there. THat's not to say noone has had firsthand experience or issues, but there's a lot more that speak and haven't had the benefit of experience. On their forums Gibson's ever-declining quality was always a talking point, as well as the well-known stupidity of anyone who would ever spend such money on said inferior product. And every week there was some horror story about a broken headstock (how did it break? it fell/got kicked off, etc. who's fault was that?) Needless to say I lost interest and haven't been back in some time. There were some good apples though so who knows.

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Guest BentonC

The whole point of the guitar is to be a carved top Les Paul with P-90s, at an exceedingly accessible price point in the Gibson line. If that is what you are looking for, you'll love it. If you are looking for a really cheap way to get a R6, then you will likely find things that aren't "up-to-snuff" for Custom Shop standards. It has a worn satin finish, not a VOS. This is one of the main factors that make this instrument so affordable, and if it had a full gloss finish, it would easily cost much more. I love these guitars, and have spoken with a lot of customers who have loved thiers as well!

 

It goes through the same QC and setup as Les Paul Standards, Traditionals, and Supremes, so there shouldn't be any playability or tone issues with the guitar.

 

I'm in no way saying that the guitar was skimped on in any way in manufacturing- it is just a stripped down Les Paul Studio with P-90s, and a really cool worn finish. A great guitar! [biggrin]

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The whole point of the guitar is to be a carved top Les Paul with P-90s, at an exceedingly accessible price point in the Gibson line. If that is what you are looking for, you'll love it. If you are looking for a really cheap way to get a R6, then you will likely find things that aren't "up-to-snuff" for Custom Shop standards. It has a worn satin finish, not a VOS. This is one of the main factors that make this instrument so affordable, and if it had a full gloss finish, it would easily cost much more. I love these guitars, and have spoken with a lot of customers who have loved thiers as well!

 

It goes through the same QC and setup as Les Paul Standards, Traditionals, and Supremes, so there shouldn't be any playability or tone issues with the guitar.

 

I'm in no way saying that the guitar was skimped on in any way in manufacturing- it is just a stripped down Les Paul Studio with P-90s, and a really cool worn finish. A great guitar! [biggrin]

 

Benton, tell me/us...were the original '50's LP bodies w/cap 2" thick, or 1 3/4" at the upper bout,

where the neck joint is? My '50's and '60's Tributes are both 1 3/4" thick, at that spot, and all

my other LP's ('80 Custom,'76 Deluxe, and 1999 "Classic") are 2" thick, at that same area.

 

Was that another "cost cutting" decision, or were they following the originals, in that regard?

No biggie (to me), just curious.

 

Thanks,

CB

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Benton, tell me/us...were the original '50's LP bodies w/cap 2" thick, or 1 3/4" at the upper bout,

where the neck joint is? My '50's and '60's Tributes are both 1 3/4" thick, at that spot, and all

my other LP's ('80 Custom,'76 Deluxe, and 1999 "Classic") are 2" thick, at that same area.

 

Was that another "cost cutting" decision, or were they following the originals, in that regard?

No biggie (to me), just curious.

 

Thanks,

CB

 

That's an interesting point, CB!

 

I've just checked my lot and three (a 1991 and 2 x 1995) are 1 7/8", whilst the fourth (a 1993) is 2" at the upper bout/neck area. All are 2" at the lower bout.

 

Looking at the Black Beauty illustration in the '57 Gibson catalogue it mentions, in the specs; "...17 1/4" long, 12 3/4" wide, 1 3/4" thick..."

Curiously, in the '60 catalogue it says, for both the Custom and the Standard; "...12 3/4" wide, 17 1/4" long, 1 3/4" thin..."

(My stress in both examples)

 

Quoting from Yas Iwanade's "The Beauty of the 'Burst" he mentions...

(p 221) "Body Thickness. The thickness of the body stays consistent throughout the period, especially at the neck joint. Accuracy was extremely important to assure the proper neck pitch."

(p 197) "Contour of the top. The thickest part of the top is around the bridge and it measures 1/2". Unlike the measurement of other areas this measurement is extremely consistent among many different examples...The mahogany for the back measures 1 3/4". So, together with the maple top the body's total thickness is 2 1/4". Since the binding covers the lamination line at the edge of the top, the thickness of the maple at the body edge cannot be directly measured. However, it can be obtained by subtracting the mahogany's thickness from the total thickness at the edge of the body. An average thickness of 9/64" is obtained from that calculation."

 

As 9/64" is near-as-damnit to 1/8" this gives us an overall body thickness of 1 7/8"

 

He also includes an appendix showing the thicknesses of most of the instruments in the book. The figures are quite surprising...

 

Whereas in my four examples all are thicker at the rear strap-button than at the neck joint, every single one of the 32 instruments measured in TBotB is thinner at the strap-button. Sometimes only by 1/16", but always thinner.

 

Was this to help create the 'dished' look?

 

:-k

 

P.

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The whole point of the guitar is to be a carved top Les Paul with P-90s, at an exceedingly accessible price point in the Gibson line. If that is what you are looking for, you'll love it. If you are looking for a really cheap way to get a R6, then you will likely find things that aren't "up-to-snuff" for Custom Shop standards. It has a worn satin finish, not a VOS. This is one of the main factors that make this instrument so affordable, and if it had a full gloss finish, it would easily cost much more. I love these guitars, and have spoken with a lot of customers who have loved thiers as well!

 

It goes through the same QC and setup as Les Paul Standards, Traditionals, and Supremes, so there shouldn't be any playability or tone issues with the guitar.

 

I'm in no way saying that the guitar was skimped on in any way in manufacturing- it is just a stripped down Les Paul Studio with P-90s, and a really cool worn finish. A great guitar! [biggrin]

 

So Benton basically what you are saying is that you get what you pay for, which is fair enough. Considering that the guitar is available for £750 here in the U.K, it seems like a bargain to me.

I’m of now to see if I can find one locally to try before I buy. I do know where there are two in a shop some distance away, one Gold & Honeyburst so the choice will be down to which plays best, but I had kind of set my heart on a gold one.

 

Many thanks for everyone’s help and opinions.

 

Regards,

Ian.

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The fit and finish on mine is excellent. But I am a drummer and bought it for my son. It sounded great at the music store played by a great guitar player. Nice tone, crunch. Nice clean sound. The P90's can sound bright.

f4c3e5e3.jpg

Just looked it over good. It's a 2 piece!

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I have this guitar in the Gold finish and I am really happy with it. It plays very comfortable and easy, and sounds very good to me.

 

I think many people have different perceptions of what this guitar is supposed to be. It's not a VOS guitar.

It's a very affordable U.S. made Gibson Les Paul, with P90 Pickups. The neck feels great.

The fit on all the parts on my guitar are excellent. It just doesn't have the frills that the higher end Les Paul's have, hence the lower price.

The only thing that I could knock on mine is that the truss rod cover screws were loose but that was easily rectified.

I play mine through a Vox AC15H1TVL and it sounds great. It has that snappy punchy sound that you would expect from a P90 guitar.

 

Cheers,

Ian

Thats a nice amp, is that the combo or head and cab? Our local store has the heritage head and cab for $1999 New Zealand dollars which seems to be a good price
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