Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

SG Standard intonation question


LeBudfrumHull_SG

Recommended Posts

This might be a bit of a noob question , but I'd like some input before I start screwing around with my guitar.

I've setup the intonation on my SG, except now the saddle for my G string is set all the way back, and it's not intonated correctly....

so I can't adjust the saddle any farther.

What can I do to be able to get the intonation spot on ?

Will adjusting the the bridge height do anything or does that just raise (or lower) the action ?

 

Thanks

 

LeBud

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ran into this issue before.

The problem was intonating with old strings and my action was too high. Only intonate with new strings!

I put the saddles back to how they were. Luckly I could see the old spot becasue it was all shinny with no dust on it. Then with new strings I lowered my action a bit and redid the intonation. This time I found the sweetspot with room to spare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as intonation goes in most cases, if you're satisfied with the action and are keeping the same string gauge, no bridge height or truss adjustments adjustments should be needed.

Usually spinning the saddle in place for the problem string will give you more adjustment length to work with in either direction for intonation.

If not, seek professional help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as intonation goes in most cases, if you're satisfied with the action and are keeping the same string gauge, no bridge height or truss adjustments adjustments should be needed.

Usually spinning the saddle in place for the problem string will give you more adjustment length to work with in either direction for intonation.

If not, seek professional help.

 

I read your reply and after letting the "spinning the saddle in place " sink in, I had a face palm moment. #-o

Basically , all I have to do is turn the adjustment screw to place the saddle back to the middle of the bridge, re-tune & re-adjust the intonation ....

Any reason why this shouldn't work ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basically , all I have to do is turn the adjustment screw to place the saddle back to the middle of the bridge, re-tune & re-adjust the intonation ....

 

I think the poster is talking about unscrewing the adjustment screw, pull out the saddle, turn it around and replace the adjustment screw.

 

This gives you more room toward the stop (back). . i.f . . the vertical side of the saddle is facing the neck and the angled side is facing the stop. In this configuration, turning the saddle in place puts the straight side toward the stop, providing the saddle edge a bit more travel toward the stop.

 

 

There's also a replacement bridge that adjusts against the bridge anchors to give more room toward the stop - http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Bridges,_tailpieces/Electric_guitar,_non-trem_bridges/Pigtail_Aluminum_Wraparound_Bridge.html

 

Pigtail_Aluminum_Wraparound_Bridge_lg.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the response !

I think I'll be paying a visit to my luthier in the very near future...

I know many players like modding their guitars, but I like mine the way it is.

If I have no choice, I'll change the bridge, but that's something I'd rather avoid doing.

 

Any ideas as to how it got to this point ? The guitar is barely 2 years old and I don't abuse it at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... I think I'll be paying a visit to my luthier in the very near future... . . If I have no choice, I'll change the bridge, but that's something I'd rather avoid doing. . . . . . . Any ideas

 

Good idea on a visit to your luthier.

 

I understand using the bridge change as a last resort - also a good idea.

 

As far as ideas - - could be a number of things - some already mentioned. Hopefully your luthier can sort it out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good idea on a visit to your luthier.

 

I understand using the bridge change as a last resort - also a good idea.

 

As far as ideas - - could be a number of things - some already mentioned. Hopefully your luthier can sort it out.

flipping the saddle works good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

So I took the guitar to my local tech...and lo and behold, he flipped the saddle and got the intonation spot-on.

He also tweaked the guitar's bridge & neck and now it plays like butter ... low action and no fret buzz.

It's a great feeling when you get your guitar back and it practically plays itself !

My only concern now is that if the trend continues, I'll need to replace the bridge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...