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can i ask this question?


rotem

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hi guys, i don't sure i can ask this question but i will,

i have just bought a new les paul studio with you inspired (thanks) and i want to buy new amp for it, and im thinking about the marshall jmd1 501.

what do you think im trying to find a cheep one that will sound good, and by the way i am performing in small bars, thanks for any help,

btw if i broke the roll tell me(;

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I do not give advise on amps I have not played. On that note I highly suggest you take your guitar go out and test amps. That is the only way to find one that will create the tone you are wanting. Do not use an in store guitar but your own. The reason you might ask even if it is the same model is every guitar sounds different and the on in the store is not what you will be playing. Sorry I can not be much help here but to me amps are even more personal then the guitar as part of an electric guitar system. Good luck.

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I do not give advise on amps I have not played. On that note I highly suggest you take your guitar go out and test amps. That is the only way to find one that will create the tone you are wanting. Do not use an in store guitar but your own. The reason you might ask even if it is the same model is every guitar sounds different and the on in the store is not what you will be playing. Sorry I can not be much help here but to me amps are even more personal then the guitar as part of an electric guitar system. Good luck.

thank you

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I have a Robot LP which is basically a Studio with toys on it. I was playing it through my JMD 501 last night and it sounds great on many channel selections. I also play a ES-339 semi-hollow on it and a 1960 LP reissue. All sound great.

I am not a gigging musician in the real sense of the word but another member on the site has a JMD and gigs regularly with it and loves it. His username here is Guitarest. Hopefully he will read the post and add his own comments or suggestions.

 

Dave

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50 W is HUGE for a small bar, but will cover most venues you are likely to play as a semi-pro musician. I'd say 15 W is fine for most small venues.

 

 

If you've got stadium gigs booked, go for the 100 W amps, but otherwise......

 

 

And I second the "try it out with your rig" first.... pedals, guitar, etc.

 

 

I'd also mention the Bogner Alchemist. I've not played that particular Marshall, but I have played the Bogner and it rocks.

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Never played a bar, with anything more than 40 watts. And, even then, it was

nowhere near, it's "Sweet Spot," volume & tone wise. 22 watt Fender Deluxe

Reverb is "Made" for those kinds of venues. Anything else, in that (tube) wattage,

if you don't care for "Fender" amp tone, would be fine...power wise.

Myself, I use either my Blues Jr., or my Hot Rod Deluxe. Depends on the size

of the bar, and it's acoustics, too. "Tone" is so subjective, and personal, I can't

really tell you, what you should look for, there. You'll know it, though, when you

hear it! ;>)

 

CB

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hi guys first thank you,

is there any difference on the quality between the 100w and the 50w?

 

 

Not sure what you're referring to by quality... if we're talking Marshall, they should all be well contructed and durable.

 

What you're looking at is the ability to dial in the tone you're looking for within the acoustic constraints of the venue you're playing. What Duane is referring to... head room... basically means you have a LOT of top end volume left over once you've dialed in the proper volume level for most small venues. This would be true with a 50 W amp as well, but to a lesser degree. What CB is talking about... the sweet spot... is the saturation level you get from tubes. There is an "optimum" level at which the amp will deliver the sound you are looking for. This is something you'll have to find for yourself, as it's "that sound in your head". If you have a smaller wattage amp, and the sound you're looking for is closer to the top end, it is easier to attain and still maintain a good volume level for the venue.

 

Watch the guys playing on TV, like at the award shows and such. Notice what they are using and the size of the venue they are playing. You should notice that they are mostly not using the largest amp they can find, but one more adaptable to the size of the room.

 

 

Did that make any sense at all?

 

 

:-k

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you are going to think I am nuts... but a real sleeper underrated amp that you can get used for cheap are the Roland Jazz Chorus Series amps... They come in about 3-4 different designs.. and all of them are powerful enough for your needs... I have the JC77 (two 10 in speakers)... They are very good amps.. The ones made from about 78 - 95 are all Japanese and are great quality... and they can be had for under $300...

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you are going to think I am nuts... but a real sleeper underrated amp that you can get used for cheap are the Roland Jazz Chorus Series amps... They come in about 3-4 different designs.. and all of them are powerful enough for your needs... I have the JC77 (two 10 in speakers)... They are very good amps.. The ones made from about 78 - 95 are all Japanese and are great quality... and they can be had for under $300...

 

Yeah, they're great! Probably the "Cleanest" souding amps, on the planet!

I keep thinking about getting one of them, for my Ric 12-string, alone. (Smile)

Ahhh...someday!

 

 

CB

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