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wungoodtexun

Question for the Archtop Guys

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Yep, that's a keeper. I'm not sure whether I would put any money into "restoration", but it's definitely worth spending a little money to make it playable (if necessary).

 

Be careful though, playing old archtops is a very serious, progressive, and addictive disease to which there is no cure.

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That Triumph was probably made between 1941 and 1948, from the look of it. You should get it appraised. It may sell for more than $2K. "Restoration" can actually decrease the value of an instrument, so exercise caution.

 

Red 333

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Thanks for letting me know wasnt sure about this one but when I saw it I knew i had to get it. Binding is coming loose in spots and shrunk a little but I myself have the same problem..lol Dallas international guitar festival coming up this weekend might run up there and see what I can find out...

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That guitar is definitly worth a few bucks, and not the "cheapy" it may appear to be. It is desireable/collectable to the point that right now it may be hard to determine the exact value because archtops and collecting is all over the board, mostly as a result of collecters buying for investment purposes and perhaps a market correction going on. i would not be surprised if you got estimates anywhere from $800 to $4500.

 

Monetary value aside, that guitar is an "Epiphone" Epiphone, not a cheaper version of a Gibson like they are today, but from a time when Epiphones were direct competiters with Gibson. It is not the top of the line Epi, but it is made the same way as the top Epiphones. At the time it was made, Epiphone was considered a top quality maker and regarded as highly (maybe higher?) than Gibson. In some ways, that guitar could represent the top of the food chain as far as archtops of the period go.

 

It is for sure worthwhile to make effeorts to preserve it and take care in any restoration/repairs in keeping it origional, and also definitely worth playing.

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That there looks to be a 1937 Triumph and in very nice shape ( mine was a 35 ) which are much more desirable these days ( the 34- 42 ) as for value well that should run around $1800- $2500 in excellent shape.Please do nothing to it unless it needs repair work, once other things are done it really devalues the fair market value.Ship

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lol..another -1.

 

I thought what I wrote was useful and accurate. The important thing is the op gets the right info regarding such a piece of guitar history. Because that is what it is.

 

Please don't take the negative of my post to mean the guitar is not what it is or less valueable. It really is a fine peice of american history and should be a great sounding and playing guitar.

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I didn't take any of that as negative..I am so glad there is a place like this where a person can find help..I have had, and still have many fine musical instruments...mastered none but love the challenge. It really does have a great sound and have heard one for years never realizing the archtop was behind that sound..thanks and again ya'lls knowledge is very much welcome Johnny

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Actually, I'd recommend not holding onto it. Send her my way and I'll send you twenty bucks. And since I'm such a nice guy I'll pick up the shipping and handling. [thumbup]

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Actually, I'd recommend not holding onto it. Send her my way and I'll send you twenty bucks. And since I'm such a nice guy I'll pick up the shipping and handling. [thumbup]

 

 

Dang almost an impossable deal to pass up...but i wouldnt feel right about the deal with you payin the shipping and all...lol

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According to the serial number this Epiphone Triumph is from 1946 (approximate date as with all New York Epis).

Tailpiece and pickguard are non-original. Tuners and bridge (with natural base) look correct (but close-up pictures would help).

 

Nice, well worth restoring!

 

F

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Dang almost an impossable deal to pass up...but i wouldnt feel right about the deal with you payin the shipping and all...lol

[wink]

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That's beautiful. Nice find. If I owned it, I would want

to make it playable, so I could enjoy it. Seems someone could

work on whatever it needs and not hurt the value. Perhaps it would

enhance its value.

 

Or is the rule of antiques: don't touch, just look?

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...

Or is the rule of antiques: don't touch, just look?

 

That's what my great uncle used to say, "An antique is something that no one liked well enough, or didn't work well enough for anyone to wear out."

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I have a '50s Harmony single pickup archtop that at various times I've played the heck out of.

 

I'd say electrify, checked out and any repairs by a good luthier and have set up for your fave strings and have at it.

 

m

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Found at estate auction. Archtops are something im not familiar with is this something worth holding on to maybe get restored?..Figured some of you guys would know. here is a pic and the label inside the F-hole

 

HOLY CRAP,..............YES !!!!

 

 

 

5613610758_df5498b837.jpg

guitar 001 by wungoodtexun, on Flickr

 

 

5613032135_39fc653ef3.jpg

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Hold on to that little gem,she wasn't one of their low-end models when made but was in the upper-middle range if my memory serves me correctly.If you are going to get anything done with it keep it to a bare minimum to keep any ongoing problems from spreading and leave it at that.It would behoove you to spend the extra bucks for a top notch luthier who specializes in archtop style guitars as they are a completely different animal when it comes to construction-especially as far as bracing is concerned.Congrats on getting a sweet piece of guitar history-there's something about an archtops sound that's captivating and so different from other acoustics.

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Holy Crap! NO!

 

Send it to me with twenty bucks for storage and handling and I'll keep it for you for a couple years. [woot]

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Holy Crap! NO!

 

Send it to me with twenty bucks for storage and handling and I'll keep it for you for a couple years. [woot]

 

#-o God I must be going senile. I responded twice to the same original post with essentially the same response, not remembering the first response. [blush]

 

Next thing you know I'll be needing Depends.

 

:blink:

 

>crap<

 

Forgot to pick them up too.

[blush] [blush]

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