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Gibson with a split saddle?????


onewilyfool

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The guitar is on ebay and of course I'm watching her! It's a 1966 so it should have the adjustable bridge, I guess that one of the previous owner had it replaced and the luthier he chose to go with the split design.

 

Anyway it looks like a good job.

 

P.S. The label is correct for a Country & Western, the gold grovers are not original

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It's a 1966 so it should have the adjustable bridge, I guess that one of the previous owner had it replaced and the luthier he chose to go with the split design.

 

Yep, it does seem to be a replacement. Gibson has built customs with multiple saddles -- including at least one (for Emmylou, IIRC) with three saddles, which is enough to optimize intonation of every string -- but this doesn't appear to be one of them.

 

-- Bob R

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Bridge and saddle definitely not OEM. The compensation angle seems a bit severe, but whatever works.

 

If I'd seen that label in a pawn shop, I'd have thought, "Knock-off."

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Bridge and saddle definitely not OEM. The compensation angle seems a bit severe, but whatever works.

 

If I'd seen that label in a pawn shop, I'd have thought, "Knock-off."

 

It surprises me that a lot of gibson fans aren't familiar with the cream label of the country & western model (with relative lazo):

 

gibson%20acoustic%20guitar-531481207297520281.jpg

 

The label of the SC is a nice rework of that old label, that seems the only difference between the C&W and the Southern Jumbo Natural...

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I had my square shouldered SJ of the infamous 70ies era done exactly that way by an area tech many long years ago. It was quite popular in the 70ies and was a plus to tone. When I finally got it back to playing status this year I stayed original. No complaints.

 

 

 

Hall

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I had my square shouldered SJ of the infamous 70ies era done exactly that way by an area tech many long years ago. It was quite popular in the 70ies and was a plus to tone. When I finally got it back to playing status this year I stayed original. No complaints.

 

 

 

Hall

 

I didn't understand if you replaced the bridge in the 70s and then...you swapped to the original adjustable bridge?

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It surprises me that a lot of gibson fans aren't familiar with the cream label of the country & western model (with relative lazo):

 

gibson%20acoustic%20guitar-531481207297520281.jpg

 

The label of the SC is a nice rework of that old label, that seems the only difference between the C&W and the Southern Jumbo Natural...

 

I'd never seen one of those before. Now I have. Thanks for the schooling. If I see one in a pawn shop, I won't think, "Knockoff."

 

[biggrin]

 

"Lazo"... had to look that one up. Surprisingly, I couldn't find a definition, but from various usage, I'd say it mean rope or the apparent anglicized version; lasso.

 

However, babelfish translates it from the Spanish as "Bow". Not sure if that is bow of a ship, or a bow and arrow, or "take a bow" .

 

My head hurts. Can I go home now?

 

](*,)

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I didn't understand if you replaced the bridge in the 70s and then...you swapped to the original adjustable bridge?

 

 

 

 

Replaced each time. Original was not an adjustable bridge and it is back on the guitar now as of last month. I had a split saddle bridge put on in the 70ies at purchase and set up.

 

 

Hall

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I'm certain that is NOT a 1966 model. By the serial number given, it appears to be a circa 1973 model from the Norlin era. I also see other things that lead me to believe it is not from 1966 (the lower placement of the "crown" on the headstock, for one thing).

That split bridge saddle is still a puzzler, though.

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I'm certain that is NOT a 1966 model. By the serial number given, it appears to be a circa 1973 model from the Norlin era. I also see other things that lead me to believe it is not from 1966 (the lower placement of the "crown" on the headstock, for one thing).

That split bridge saddle is still a puzzler, though.

 

1973 Country & Western deluxes had block inlays.

 

Plus, according to my source (Gibson's flat tops by whitford, vinopal & erlewine) the serial number range 859001-895038 means 1967. For the split saddle I think we discussed it enough in this thread...

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I edited out what I had said here as it was a little strong and maybe unfair. But, Alex. I don't think it is your hands to decide whether a split saddle should or should not be mentioned again. Craig, they were not factory issue saddles, but it was a popular tone/brace change issue during the 70ies.

 

 

Hall

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I edited out what I had said here as it was a little strong and maybe unfair. But, Alex. I don't think it is your hands to decide whether a split saddle should or should not be mentioned again. Craig, they were not factory issue saddles, but it was a popular tone/brace change issue during the 70ies.

 

 

Hall

 

I didn't say that the split saddle should not be mentioned again but I had the impression that Craig didn't read carefully the precedent posts, on the other side he seems to have strong opinions about the instrument and I'd like to know on which basis he decided that it's a 1973 guitar.

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This is a 1966 Gibson Country Western - notice the placement of the crown inlay on the headstock - it almost lines up perfectly with the 2 middle tuners - it's in the same place on '60s Gibson acoustics

countrywestern-1.gif

 

Now here's the other - note the lower placement of the crown - Gibson moved these downward a bit a few years later (after 1966, anyway).

IMG_3773.jpg

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I didn't say that the split saddle should not be mentioned again but I had the impression that Craig didn't read carefully the precedent posts, on the other side he seems to have strong opinions about the instrument and I'd like to know on which basis he decided that it's a 1973 guitar.

 

 

 

My bad, Alex. Sorry.

 

 

Hall

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Craig, according to all the sources if it was a 1973 or anything late it should have block inlays:

 

180187313886-1.jpg

 

This is a 1973 southern jumbo deluxe natural with block inlays..for reference.

 

For the position of the crown, this '68 is even southern:

 

Gibson%20Southern%20Jumbo%20C&W%2002.jpg

 

Knowing Gibson's consistency in those years I'm not surprised to see slight variations in the positions of inlays and logo...

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OK - wasn't aware of the block inlays for early '70s - I was also going by this below

 

Gibson Serial Numbers, early to mid 1970's.

All models, stamped in back top of headstock. "MADE IN U.S.A." stamped below the serial number in back top of peghead, in the same size type, and on two lines with "U.S.A." below the "MADE IN":

Number Year

------ ----

6 digits + A 1970

000000's 1973

100000's 1970-1975

200000's 1973-1975

300000's 1974-1975

400000's 1974-1975

500000's 1974-1975

600000's 1970-1972, 1974-1975

700000's 1970-1972

800000's 1973-1975

900000's 1970-1972

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