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Is the Hummingbird the same as a Sq Shouldered CW or SJ?


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Just asking...I thought the wood used was different but looking at the Gibson website spec on the Hummingbird, they appear to be the same...

 

Am I missing something????

 

HBSpec.jpg

 

[confused]

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From my understanding they are the same guitars other than the finish / bling etc ...

 

Love both of em, actually I gave my CW a bit of a sex change and made into a HB after installing the tulip tuners, now its a 'natural' Hummingbird ...

 

But if you talk late 60's all three were basically the same guitar.

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The rumor says so. Different tuners, guards, the C&W in natural finish, but apart from that, yes. Nowadays there's no square shouldered SJ, so we have the H-birds and the Sheryl Crow left.

 

I think the story is that the original Hummingbirds from 1960 was so big a success that the 2 slopes (SJ and C&W) followed the trend a few years later. And guess they parallel shifted their way forward regarding inner alterations.

 

Then later again, maybe 1968/69, the J-45/J-50s went square too - heavy braced and of course without the neck-bindings and parallelograms. Let's hear if I missed something. . .

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The rumor says so.

 

 

I know some of the early ones were laminate, but can't figure the logic of when and why.

 

Sometimes I have wondered if there was a quality difference between the woods of the 60ties H-birds and the Sjs.

 

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Different tuners, guards, finish, but apart from that, yes.

 

the original Hummingbirds from 1960 was so big a success that 2 slopes (SJ and C&W) followed the trend a few years later. Then in 1968/69, the J-45/J-50s went square too

 

 

A bad case of Martin-envy. Better to stick with what makes you unique.

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A bad case of Martin-envy. Better to stick with what makes you unique.

 

The square shoulders Gibsons are NOT Martin copies, all the measures are different, and personally I like the sound of my SC much more than any sloped shoulders I tried, it's louder, more brilliant, more bassy.

 

The sloped shoulders are perhaps better for blues, but for rock and folk an Hummingbird for a C&W is more suited.

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That no doubt had a big influence. I read somewhere (quite possibly here) that the brief when the HB was born was to create a Gibson D-18, but in the end they created the Hummingbird, which arguably is very different to the D-18 but they hit on a winner, possibly by chance.

 

From a product, marketing perspective it was probably their biggest product launch ever, so hats off to the guys at the time.

 

 

A bad case of Martin-envy. Better to stick with what makes you unique.

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I know some of the early ones were laminate, but can't figure the logic of when and why.

 

Sometimes I have wondered if there was a quality difference between the woods of the 60ties H-birds and the Sjs.

 

 

My understanding is that there were some H-birds with laminated sides as well...however I'd love that Gibson reissues a sunburst SJ like yours.

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My understanding is that there were some H-birds with laminated sides as well...however I'd love that Gibson reissues a sunburst SJ like yours.

 

 

 

GibCW-bodyspecialedition-shouldbemadebuGibsinmasterluthierRenFerguson.jpgThen you will presumably throw your eyes after this one.

 

A lonesome swallow from recent times, , , and to confuse the crowd called a Country & Western. Only picture I got and have seen.

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Now that is one heluva pretty guitar Em7 !

 

GibCW-bodyspecialedition-shouldbemadebuGibsinmasterluthierRenFerguson.jpgThen you will presumably throw your eyes after this one.

 

A lonesome swallow from recent times, , , and to confuse the crowd called a Country & Western. Only picture I got and have seen.

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GibCW-bodyspecialedition-shouldbemadebuGibsinmasterluthierRenFerguson.jpgThen you will presumably throw your eyes after this one.

 

A lonesome swallow from recent times, , , and to confuse the crowd called a Country & Western. Only picture I got and have seen.

 

Yes, I've seen the pic, but for what I know it's a limited production model and I couldn't grab it, for the model name it seems that Gibson's marketing wants to retain the name "southern jumbo" while square shoulders are sold under the "country & western" name, but at least if they wanted to name that guitar C&W they should have used the right label, not the orange one!

 

Some people at Gibson are pretty confused...

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Original Question: "Is the Hummingbird the same as a Sq Shouldered CW or SJ?"

 

Yup. Except for aesthetic touches, the same basic guitar.

 

See also the Bozeman era J-30 which is essentially just a de-blinged version of the same guitar.

 

Yes, Em7, I saw those sunburst CWs last year -- and what a nice guitar that was/is!! -- and I just wondered what led to sunbursting a Country Western! Weird.

 

Fred

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That no doubt had a big influence. I read somewhere (quite possibly here) that the brief when the HB was born was to create a Gibson D-18, but in the end they created the Hummingbird, which arguably is very different to the D-18 but they hit on a winner, possibly by chance.

 

From a product, marketing perspective it was probably their biggest product launch ever, so hats off to the guys at the time.

 

Gibson's first attempt was the Epiphone Frontier followed by the HB.

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Here is another sunburst CW from Wildwood guitars. Amongst all the SJs they have, here is this!

 

Aha, , , the missing link.

To me those neutral guard bursts with neck-bindings and parallelograms remain Southern Jumbos. Sq. or slopes -

 

 

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02999032_t.jpg

 

Here is another sunburst CW from Wildwood guitars. Amongst all the SJs they have, here is this!

 

Yeah, I've seen that one, very nice, correct labrel, incorrect finish. I wonder what's the difference between this guitar and a SJ, they look the same.

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Highly confusing – I can see 2 guitar-souls discussing this on a bar Saturday night.

 

"That would be a Southern Jumbo."

 

"Absolutely not, it's a Country and Western."

 

"If you say it's burst, it's bound to be a SJ."

 

"But I'm sure the label says Country & Western."

 

"You're dreaming !"

 

"Dreaming,, , , , me ?"

 

"Yes, your memory fails you tonite."

 

"Are you saying I'm drunk !"

 

"In fact -YES !"

 

"Duel at sunrise !!!"

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  • 3 months later...

I just bought a Sheryl Crow Sig model. This guitar has been calling me for years. I love natural finishes firstly, but I find the square shoulder models to be much more versatile than sloped shoulder models. I've owned 2 J-45s and the Hummingbird model is the one for me...I still love J-45s as well..in fact most Gibsons!

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Original Question: "Is the Hummingbird the same as a Sq Shouldered CW or SJ?"

 

Is the Hummingbird the same as a Sq Shouldered J45?

I would say yes, and did in post 4. Then again I haven't played many Birds from the late '60ties. Tried a late '60's J-45 last year and it came very close to my '68 Southern J. - which simply is the Bird without the birds and bees.

 

Somebody with the Gibson Flattop book better speak up.- - - I have my brand new version of this bible lying in the post-box unopened. It arrived today and I'll dig into this copy with excitement when the moon shows up. Gonna go out and hear a couple of young songwriters first.

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Gonna go out and hear a couple of young songwriters first.

Just returned from a folk-evening in another part of town. 3 acts, 2 Gibsons involved. A J-45 white nut Standard and, , , , a 1991 J-45 all hog. The head a bit more pointing than the Standard/45 norm and with the old logo, no banner.

The young folkie told me only 20-something were made back then. He obviously loved the guitar and used 12 month old '13 strings. Played fine and created a pretty soft rounded sound, which worked good in the room – and with his splendid high voice.

 

So here's another completely new 45 to me : Mahogany back'n'sides'n'top.

 

 

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