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E-minor7

Hummingbird close to 50 ~

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[media]http://youtu.be/c4P9AI_vmfo[/media]

 

Check this amazingly well-kept '62 Hummingbird and get an idea of the vintage flavour – and the instrument as it sounded when it came out.

 

You'll hear more body than from a slope, stronger bass and top – it is louder. Almost a bit too embracing - as if the bigger cubic sets out for slightly more than the physics of the guitar are able to fill. Don't know, may be a little daring in this description, but I notice the same when I compare what I have here. A '63 sq. sh. SJ and a '59 J-45. EuroA asked me to tell about the difference when I got the 45 back from the luthier. Now was time to do it.

 

The demonstrater isn't the biggest performer on earth, but opposed to many Tube-tests (lords bless them) this one does the job okay. He speaks a little too much for us who know what he is talking 'bout already, never mind.

 

You'll hear volume close to a rumble – Just wish he would have fingerpicked the creature. Bet it would have been terrific.

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Here is our 1962.

 

1962HUMMINGBIRDa.jpg

 

1962HUMMINGBIRDb.jpg

 

We have a couple of recording on our "the way we were in the 60s with 60s guitars" series. We are into reality recording.

 

Irene

Flowers

 

Let's pick,

-Tom

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http://youtu.be/IkbwexL1Zv4

 

And here something else. . .

Marvellous voice -

Custom, , , is it maple ?

 

It looks to be one of the quilted maple Hummingbirds. Bozeman did two runs of the model, one in bright cherry burst and the other a teaburst finish. Both had gold plated Grover keystone tuners and truss rod covers that said Custom. Curiously, I think both colors also did not have binding that extended over the fret-ends, which has since become standard for non-TV 'Birds.

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Lovelly Hummingbird. I played the samwe chord progression with my 69' CW and I found the tone to be quite similar but the HB had a bit more depth, which Im guessing is from the lighter bracing compared to the CW.

 

Lovelly guitar all the way though !

 

[media]http://youtu.be/c4P9AI_vmfo[/media]

 

Check this amazingly well-kept '62 Hummingbird and get an idea of the vintage flavour – and the instrument as it sounded when it came out.

 

You'll hear more body than from a slope, stronger bass and top – it is louder. Almost a bit too embracing - as if the bigger cubic sets out for slightly more than the physics of the guitar are able to fill. Don't know, may be a little daring in this description, but I notice the same when I compare what I have here. A '63 sq. sh. SJ and a '59 J-45. EuroA asked me to tell about the difference when I got the 45 back from the luthier. Now was time to do it.

 

The demonstrater isn't the biggest performer on earth, but opposed to many Tube-test (lords bless them) this one does the job okay. He speaks a little too much for us who know what he is talking 'bout already, never mind.

 

You'll hear volume close to a rumble – Just wish he would have fingerpicked the creature. Bet it would have been terrific.

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I thought this is an intersting comparisement.

 

A 63's HB and a new HB TV that is its modern twin.

 

Which do you prefer ?

 

 

 

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Here is our 1962.

 

1962HUMMINGBIRDa.jpg

 

1962HUMMINGBIRDb.jpg

 

We have a couple of recording on our "the way we were in the 60s with 60s guitars" series. We are into reality recording.

 

Irene

Flowers

 

Let's pick,

-Tom

 

Nothing like suddenly meeting Santa in June. Apart from that I'm a big fan of these guitars. Yours sounds goood – warm and deep with lots of projection. And it is in top-form. Think I've seen your clips before when I was first researching on the square shoulders - groovy. See/hear you feature the rosewood saddle opposed to ceramic in the first demonstration video. The guitar can bear it. I had a mixed bone/rosewood made for mine - the trebs got too sharp.

 

Yeah let's imagine a transatlantic jam, , , I'm right behind Pete Seeger. . .

Btw.Tom – Could you explain your personal reason for choosing r-wood, not porcelain ? Did you just keep it the way it was or have you tried alternatives. . .

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This German guy is a serious ornithologist. Seen him a couple of times. The 2 guitars here are clearly in family – from these clips anyway (he has a third from '97 and it is within the same vein as well).

 

EuroA – you should do yourself a favour and actually compare a light/heavy braced square shoulder in real life – think the line is drawn between 1967 and '68. I won't talk pro/contra, but they are different. Let me know when the experiment is done.

 

 

 

 

 

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Would love the Em7 but the chance of finding a vintage Gibson square sholdered acoustics in this neck of the woods is about possibly as Czechs giving up beer ... the CW was bought in NYC.

 

This German guy is a serious ornithologist. Seen him a couple of times. The 2 guitars here are clearly in family – from these clips anyway (he has a third from '97 and it is within the same vein as well).

 

EuroA – you should do yourself a favour and actually compare a light/heavy braced square shoulder in real life – think the line is drawn between 1967 and '68. I won't talk pro/contra, but they are different. Let me know when the experiment is done.

 

 

 

 

 

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, , , but the chance of finding a vintage Gibson square sholdered acoustics in this neck of the woods is about possibly as Czechs giving up beer ...

 

 

 

 

I understand. A bit strange when you think about it. There ought to an audience for those.

Anyway - sooner or later one will emerge and you'll get your chance.

 

17 years ago or so I came down the pavement and a door to an old store that was now an apartment stood open. Inside an acoustic Gibson leaned against the wall. The door had some kind of 1 meter barricade sat up so the dog wouldn't run out. It was in the middle of the day and the sun was playing. Everybody was in good spirit so I knocked the frame and a lady appeared. Asked her if I could try the rare guitar and she said yes. Next moment I was sitting on a chair strumming the G. with a little dog in front of me. Can't recall which model – neither dog or Gibson - but it was severely burned (the Gibson). After 5 minutes I thanked the kind lady and - like a Zorro figure - disappeared in a flash.

 

A tiny slice of the ideal world.

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Wow Em7.....

 

That '62 sounds fantastic! Thats why I love guitars today, especially Gibsons. Grew up in a house where a 60s Hummingbird ruled the roost.

 

Thanks for the link.

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In post 1 I made a wish for some vintage Hummingbird fingerpicking – Found this today. It gives you a fair picture of what the guitar is capable of. Notice what I begin to see as a general tendency for these almost 50 year old sq. shoulders : A deeep warm bass and a sometimes too sharp treb. This is 1964. Enjoy. . .

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Nice '62' Hummingbird and great shape,tone and all / I have a '63' Hummingbird Custom with great tone and a joy to play / 48 years old but shows its age more / My main Guitar for years / The tone gets better over time / Don't know why it is called a custom, maybe the ajustable bridge or the mahogany back,sides & neck? I use 13-56 strings and thats my baby for Life [biggrin]

 

Wow~enjoy that '62' Bird it Only gets better / Enjoy that Gibson ~ from: North Carolina [thumbup]

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Btw.Tom – Could you explain your personal reason for choosing r-wood, not porcelain ? Did you just keep it the way it was or have you tried alternatives. .

 

We just left it original. At one point, we (my wife and I) were folk revival musicians, but a bit over 30 years ago we went over to the dark side and formed a bluegrass band. We still play folk some -- mostly local "coffee houses" -- and our folk era instruments do get some use. We know we could non-evasively upgrade the bridge/saddle, but nothing in our use of the instrument would warrant the risk, trouble, and cost.

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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Nothing like suddenly meeting Santa in June. Apart from that I'm a big fan of these guitars. Yours sounds goood – warm and deep with lots of projection. And it is in top-form. Think I've seen your clips before when I was first researching on the square shoulders - groovy. See/hear you feature the rosewood saddle opposed to ceramic in the first demonstration video. The guitar can bear it. I had a mixed bone/rosewood made for mine - the trebs got too sharp.

 

Yeah let's imagine a transatlantic jam, , , I'm right behind Pete Seeger. . .

Btw.Tom – Could you explain your personal reason for choosing r-wood, not porcelain ? Did you just keep it the way it was or have you tried alternatives. . .

 

man I almost shat my pants when I heard that bird being played :)

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