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Keef , Mick and Brian


JuanCarlosVejar

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Me likes very much, Thanks!

Recently, finished reading Keef's Life book. Man, what a character he has been through life. Its a miracle he,s still alive. I recommend the book to anyone even 'mildly' interested. Kind of a tough read until you get to the middle.

Rod [thumbup]

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Didn't realise Jagger could actually play the guitar. Is he any good?

Jagger never was a James Taylor on guitar, but he can express himself.

I once heard Keith say that if you would want to experience the real Mick J., then watch/hear him blow the harp -

 

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I once heard Keith say that if you would want to experience the real Mick J., then watch/hear him blow the harp -

 

 

Keef talks about this in "Life". VERY complimentary about Mick's harp playing.

 

As retrorod says, it's a good read (actually I've been listening to the audiobook version - read by a certain Mr. J. Depp!)

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Great pics, great guitars.

 

Didn't realise Jagger could actually play the guitar. Is he any good?

 

I don't think he is a virtuoso , but I do think he can do pretty good . He has an extensive collection of vintage gibsons , a few martins and some taylors too .

 

I imagine he has abilities , that he keeps for himself .

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keef1.jpg

 

 

brianmick.jpg

 

 

hope you like em . they are not from the same time frame .

 

That's my favorite picture of Keith. Have it on my screen savor at work and on my wall, as well as on a couple t-shirts [thumbup] . Being a huge fan of the man, I learned to play quite a few of the songs from that era. Mostly songs from 68 Beggars Banquet and 69 Let it Bleed, but also a few from their early 70's work (Sticky Fingers -Exile ). That's also when Keith used to play my favorite guitar, the Hummingbird [love] .

 

Mick can play, although miles away from Keith's more nuanced and subtle playing. You can check some videos on You Tube from the Stripped album (Sweet Virginia for example ) and his solo work ( Party Doll).

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The first three Stones albums were a musical awakening for me back in '64 & '65, but I then found myself increasingly disinterested in their work while discovering the real stuff. Still, Richards is completely right: The Stones get a huge chunk of credit for handing America it's blues players back to them on a British platter.

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Thought you all might enjoy this .... very funny.

 

 

I have to file it too - Great find ! Wonder what album they're talking about. It's spring 69 and Sticky Fingers came 2 years later. The world hasn't heard their wildest record yet : Let It Bleed, released before X-mas 69. The big cake album - which I don' t think Warhol put together. . .

 

The 3 grands below -

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That shot of Brian (back to camera) & Mick shows a great shot of what must be a great sounding (studio) room. Maybe 12-14 ft. ceilings, movable panels, acoustic divider panels, rugs on the floor. Easy to figure out what guitar would sound best in there... just about anything.

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I was at college in London in the early sixty's and saw The Stones play many times at The Marque in Oxford Street, that was before it moved to Wardore Street. The Stones were just another band far from headlining but Jagger fronted the band and never with a guitar even then. The original rock n rollers always had a guitar but Presley broke the mold so I guess Jagger just followed on.

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I was at college in London in the early sixty's and saw The Stones play many times at The Marque in Oxford Street, that was before it moved to Wardore Street. The Stones were just another band far from headlining but Jagger fronted the band and never with a guitar even then. The original rock n rollers always had a guitar but Presley broke the mold so I guess Jagger just followed on.

 

Early in his career, Elvis often had a D-28 slung (sometimes with the famous leather cover) around his shoulder. Not sure how much he played it, however. And, of course, in the movie "Love Me Tender", he sings the title song strumming an unidentified flat-top with a round body shaped like a 1920's L-series Gibson, but with a different headstock.

 

In early films of Elvis doing "That's alright, Mama", he's playing a Martin dread (can't tell whether it's an 18 or a 28), backed up, of course, by the incredible Scotty Moore on one of his arch-top Gibsons.

 

I suspect Mick Jagger is a better guitarist than Elvis was, but it's clearly not his thing.

 

And speaking of singing frontmen who played guitar, we always associate Buddy Holly with his Fender, but in the only photo I've seen of him playing acoustic, it's an SJ-200.

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