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Backing up a singer - Hummingbird or J-45 ?


EuroAussie

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Both are known for being great to accompany a singer with, but I was wondering if you had a choice, which would you choose ?

 

I'm asking because for our gigs when we play large venues through a PA the SWD is the winner as we have a 2nd guitarist and its the perfect rhythm guitar due to its overtones and big bottom end.

 

However Im still experimenting to find the right guitar for the smaller pub gigs where we play through my Marshall AS100D. IIts just one guitar with a one or two voices.

 

Right now Im switching between my SJ and Furch OM, but am also about to buy a soundhole pickup which I will use for the CW to make it plugged in. The CW basically being a HB in disguise.

 

So just wondering, which one would you prefer to use for small pub gigs which would involve 70% strumming, 25% flatpicking and 5% fingerstyle ?

 

cheers.

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I'd say it's pure personal choice EA,

 

AS you know I have a similar rig in the AS100D, and at the recent gig night we had a few weeks back I covered both scenarios you're putting forward here with my woody guthrie (bling'd J45 essentially)

 

The largest part of it I played lead, accompanying a second guitarist on rhythm who was also the singer. For a small section of the gig there was just me on guitar and 2 voices.

 

My guitar was able to handle both more than adequately, only a shift in volume and small adjustment to the bass levels on the marshall when we were changing setups.

 

I'd say with the range of sounds you can get from the Marshall you can take any of the guitars that you are happy with the general sound for the ratios of playing styles you mention and Dial it in on the amp to suit the room.

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The Hummingbird without a doubt. As you may have noticed, I got a '08 TV Bird inside these walls in the early summer. Simply couldn't resist the beauty and made a plan about 1 year test-period. It's not broken in and I intend to see/hear/feel what happens over 10-12 month. Already it's clear to me that it is a fantastic strummer/flatpicker. It sounds good and delicious when fingerpicked, but lacks the depths of my J-45 Standard, which have what I call deep projection. I sense the Bird wasn't meant to be a loud guitar. And the fact that it's fairly quiet - not that deep ringing - is exactly what makes it a terrific strummer. There's no rumble, no muddy cake of frequencies fighting to get space when you give it a beating. Same logic for the flatpicking. Every note have room, which makes it a highly amusing instrument to pick. It simply is a thrill and as I'm on a path trying to regain some of my earlier picking-skills, this instrument is utterly inspiring.

 

Well, as you understand, I'm not sure what will be the destiny of me and the Bird.

What I know is that it would be too early to offer you mine. We're not done and the experiment must continue till around Feb/March next year. I'd sell it for about 2280 Euro, if it should go – no dings, excellent case + brown zipper soft coat around the case, soft gig-bag, certificate and even a jacket.

 

Oouh 1 detail : If you get hold of the thing (and why not follow the test-period idea*), do yourself a favor and learn the intro to Angie. It's a fairly challenging task, , , and a must for the genuine Bird-owner.

 

TheBirdandthetree.jpg

 

*For some of us being close to this classic is more than getting another guitar. It's an existential phase with the possibility to live and figure out deeper unexplainable longings. . .

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Hey E-minor7

 

Congrats on the 'Bird, it's lovely.

 

Should you decide to sell I'd say that's a fairly steep asking price though, I believe this one was bought when the Thomann price was still around 2500 (isee they've gone up recently) but you'd be selling a guitar for which there's no warranty, no guarantee for a little under brand new cost where there is a 3 year protection plan. It's certainly way above the 60% rule the market normally adhere's to, perhaps something to factor-in when drawing your conclusions next year.....

 

Sorry to drift off topic there but I thought it was worth mentioning.

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Cheers Em7 - so what youre saying you havent bonded yet with it, because from the way you describe it you seem to love it, so Im a bit confused ... [mellow]

 

How does it handle hard strumming, for example something like Born To Be Wild ?

At our gigs we play quite a few hard driving numbers and have to say to my somewhat surprise the SJ handles it uber well. I didnt know what to expect as looking at youtube i didnt find too many examples of a J-45 / SJ been driven quite hard.

 

How would the HB TV deal with it, no problem ?

 

Funny you mentioned Angie, had a crack at the intro sometime ago and have completely forgotten it and was just thinking yesteday i should have another crack at it.

 

If i buy one 2nd hand without playing (break my golden rule) id probably take a pick from one from US as the Czech Crwon vs Dollar would make it a steal ... not so much against the Euro.

 

The pic of the HB TV makes me drool, just looooove the cherry burst on her.

 

btw: i sent you a PM relating to the subject, check your inbox.. :-)

 

cheers.

 

 

 

 

The Hummingbird without a doubt. As you may have noticed, I got a '08 TV Bird inside these walls in the early summer. Simply couldn't resist the beauty and made a plan about 1 year test-period. It's not broken in and I intend to see/hear/feel what happens over 10-12 month. Already it's clear to me that it is a fantastic strummer/flatpicker. It sounds strong and delicious when fingerpicked, but lacks the depths of my J-45 Standard, which have what I call deep projection. I sense the Bird wasn't meant to be a loud guitar. And the fact that it's fairly quiet - not that deep ringing - is exactly what makes it a terrific strummer. There's no rumble, no muddy cake of frequencies fighting to get space when you give it a beating. Same logic for the flatpicking. Every note have room, which makes it a highly amusing instrument to pick. It simply is a thrill and as I'm on a path trying to regain some of my earlier picking-skills, this instrument is utterly inspiring.

 

Well, as you understand, I'm not sure what will be the destiny of me and the Bird.

What I know is that it would be too early to offer you mine. We're not done and the experiment must continue till around Feb/March next year. I'd sell it for about 2280 Euro, if it should go no dings, excellent case + brown zipper soft coat around the case, soft gig-bag, certificate and even a jacket.

 

Oouh 1 detail : If you get hold of the thing (and why no follow the test-period idea*), do yourself a favor and learn the intro to Angie. It's a fairly challenging task, , , and a must for the genuine Bird-owner.

 

TheBirdandthetree.jpg

*For some of us being close to this classic is more than getting another guitar. It's an existential phase with the possibility to live and figure out deeper unexplainable longings. . .

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Doesn't really matter which one you use. Using my J45 this evening at a Logan's Roadhouse (new gig for me, once-a-month for now) and used "the bird" on Sunday afternoon. Just have a good time and don't get all tied-up with which particular guitar is best, better, whatever. Have fun with it and don't sweat the rest.

 

Euro, I really like that burst on your Hummingbird. Sweet looking guitar. And those pickguards are awesome......And if I could pick like Keith Richards, Angie would be no challenge at all...lol.. That is a cool song.

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Except thats Em7's HB ... wish it was mine :-)

 

Defnitely not sweating which one to use, i love them all, i also like experimenting. I was just interested in others opinion if they were to choose one. I respect the POV of the folks here, its all good.

 

 

Doesn't really matter which one you use. Using my J45 this evening at a Logan's Roadhouse (new gig for me, once-a-month for now) and used "the bird" on Sunday afternoon. Just have a good time and don't get all tied-up with which particular guitar is best, better, whatever. Have fun with it and don't sweat the rest.

 

Euro, I really like that burst on your Hummingbird. Sweet looking guitar. And those pickguards are awesome......And if I could pick like Keith Richards, Angie would be no challenge at all...lol.. That is a cool song.

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Opps, sorry, Euro. Bet you do wish it was your's...lol.....BTW, good point on the POV. Yeah, we all have our favorites. To me (my point of view) is that some guitars, Gibsons and Martins in particular, seem to make their own statement. Kind of as if they already come with a public persona. I guess in some ways that influences me on which one I will play for some gigs. This isn't a rule I have, but something I kind of unknowningly do. The Hummingbird for a nice coffeehouse or a Starbucks. The J150 for a bar type atmosphere. And so on......Certainly, nothing carved-in-stone, but it does play into which guitar I use at times.

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The Hummingbird without a doubt. As you may have noticed, I got a '08 TV Bird inside these walls in the early summer. Simply couldn't resist the beauty and made a plan about 1 year test-period. It's not broken in and I intend to see/hear/feel what happens over 10-12 month. Already it's clear to me that it is a fantastic strummer/flatpicker. It sounds strong and delicious when fingerpicked, but lacks the depths of my J-45 Standard, which have what I call deep projection. I sense the Bird wasn't meant to be a loud guitar. And the fact that it's fairly quiet - not that deep ringing - is exactly what makes it a terrific strummer. There's no rumble, no muddy cake of frequencies fighting to get space when you give it a beating. Same logic for the flatpicking. Every note have room, which makes it a highly amusing instrument to pick. It simply is a thrill and as I'm on a path trying to regain some of my earlier picking-skills, this instrument is utterly inspiring.

 

Well, as you understand, I'm not sure what will be the destiny of me and the Bird.

What I know is that it would be too early to offer you mine. We're not done and the experiment must continue till around Feb/March next year. I'd sell it for about 2280 Euro, if it should go – no dings, excellent case + brown zipper soft coat around the case, soft gig-bag, certificate and even a jacket.

 

Oouh 1 detail : If you get hold of the thing (and why no follow the test-period idea*), do yourself a favor and learn the intro to Angie. It's a fairly challenging task, , , and a must for the genuine Bird-owner.

 

TheBirdandthetree.jpg

*For some of us being close to this classic is more than getting another guitar. It's an existential phase with the possibility to live and figure out deeper unexplainable longings. . .

 

 

I'd probably go with the bird too , EA's bird is stunning !

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Cheers Em7 -

Yes, I am a bit double-minded. But not about the strumming/flatpicking qualities of the Bird. It's just that I don't strum/flatpick that much though I'd like to handle the technique. Besides there is a natural limit to how many guitars/Gibsons I will end up keeping after this rather hefty period as Acoustic Monk is over. My plan is to try out a serious bunch of dream-6-strings under better circumstances than in the shops – experiment with different strings, tunings, recordings etc. - and then thin out the herd to an essence of absolute aces when knowledge is gained. It's a privileged situation and I intend to enjoy it as long as it lasts.

 

You're right - there is a '68 square shouldered SJ in the flock as well and they are clearly related, , , so much in fact, that I can't keep both in the longer run. The TV Bird is louder and I think (opposite yours*) drier. It's more up front and should we say 'young-blooded'. Very defined, answers well'n'precise and is a dream to play. The old darling holds back a little more – as if trying to preserve a secret – but of course has this undefinable vintage spice. Like to flatpick them both and recorded a pseudo-bluegrass solo on the SJ some months ago. Sounded so right, but so would the Bird.

 

I tune down half a step which suits both. The SJ delivers a wonderful authentic, even say mesmerizing, ring when capoed on f.x. the 4th fret and fingerpicked.

I walk around the instruments and reach out for ones needed. Sometimes I sit down and get into a particular guitar. Try to figure if it tells me the same as last time we did this or that theme or song. Sometimes I switch back'n'forth between 2 or 3 playing the same thing. It's important to use this opportunity to do all kinds of moves that would be impossible or look silly in a store. As time goes by a truer picture begins to emerge – something which is beyond my different moods and mindsets, the daily shape of the inner ear and so on. . . (I'm ridiculously sensitive to day/night – light/dark. All guitars sound better after sundown. . .

Almost certain you could make the Bird set fire to Born To Be Wild, but you have to judge by your own style. Yes, you can play it hard !

 

I'm not sure I hear more note-separation on the SJ (in fact haven't thought about it), but it has brighter/thinner trebs. *By the way don't forget we have different bridge/saddle systems, as I remember it.

Look forward to find out what happens. . .

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I really like that burst on your Hummingbird.

Thanks - yes it's like caramel. But you know how it is with bursts. They change with the light. I have pics taken on the same spot where it's much lighter/yellowish. And right now as it lies on the couch, it's one shade darker than the one above - still overwhelming. . . .

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