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Female Airman Has Amazing Voice


Searcy

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Gotta give it to the band there too. They played that spot on, all of them, and she sang it spot on with the band as well.

 

Great band discipline. I wonder if that has something to do with them being solders?

 

"PLAY THE CHORD! THAT'S AN ORDER!"

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It's perhaps a good time to note that the military has, and always has had, excellent musicians. I think sometimes people forget that fact.

 

At times I think military official musical groups tend to be on the obviously "conservative" side of music, but that's largely to be expected by the nature of things. But that shouldn't take away from the creativity or musicianship.

 

m

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These folks are from an Air National Guard unit from my hometown (St. Louis, Missouri). This is a break-out combo from a full 30-40 piece military band. I have seen this band many times, and in fact, two friends (and former bandmates) of mine are members. I had the opportunity to hear this lady sing at a concert last summer.

 

These "soldiers" are paid professional musicians. Their job in the military is to play music, that's all they do. These are not combat soldiers that have put down their rifles for the day and are jamming after work in a warehouse. The U.S. Military employs a huge number of musicians, and I know a couple of retirees who's entire military career was as a musician.

 

Had I known when I was "of age" that I could have made a military career out of playing guitar, I might have considered it. The military was not a popular career path just after the Vietnam war.

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My dad volunteered to serve in the Vietnam war and stayed for 20 years there after.

 

I kind of thought these guys and girl might have been from one of the military bands. There's no shame in serving in a support role in my eyes.

 

Here's the blurb from the video.

 

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Angie Johnson and Sidewinder perform a cover of Adele's "Rolling in the Deep." Sidewinder is part of the 571st Air Force Band, 131st Bomb Wing, Air National Guard. They are deployed as the U.S. Air Forces Central Command Band

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I think somebody should do a "fun" general readership book, not just a Masters or PhD thesis, on the evolution of the military band in the U.S., Maybe more than one.

 

For what it's worth, my great grandfather whose name I carry and part of whose history I use for first person living historian stuff, was enlisted as a musician in the 1860s U.S. contretemps that I call the second American Civil War - the first being the one in the 1770s.

 

I don't know about nowadays, but the oral history story is that great grandpa also did a lot of dispatch riding. Given that his diary talks about borrowing the general's horse to ride to town to spark the ladies and buy some supplies, it makes sense... It's the first time I'd heard of an enlisted man given permission to use a general's horse.

 

The musicians did a number of concerts, but as far as I can tell were also armed and expected to do much of the same as the regular infantrymen, sometimes mounted infantrymen, in the unit.

 

m

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