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Dyeing bone !


E-minor7

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Received 6 bone pins for my vintage J-45 yesterday. They look as if they just came home from the dentist - much too white.

 

We all know about dyeing tuners and bindings with shoe-polish. Tusq will cream down after 3 days in the sun. Is there a way to get flashing bone softened ?

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Found 3 things since establishing this thread :

 

It should of course have been posted in the Bridge – Nut - Saddle – Pins section (tend to forget it exists).

 

The topic is a worn shoe with lots of predecessors (then again new ideas could arrive anytime).

 

Think my first try will be a 6 hour bath in a cup of strong, salted/sugared brown tea.

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Bone pin problemo week.

 

This week I received from Stewmac 4 sets of ebony pins and 4 sets of plain undotted bone pins for 4 Gibsons with spares.

I have been busy going baddinngg, baaading, boing, boing, boing (sound of tightening strings up to tension again).

I put the ebony pins on my Lg1 and Lg0. Perfect. Warmed up the sound and no hint of plastic anymore...more 'organic'.

I went to put the bone pins on my Blues King and I notice they have forgottten to bleach them, but I don't mind the look so put them on - very vintage look - pics to come later.

Ditto with the next set for my J45, except these bone pins have gone 'piebald' by mistake somewhere in production, but I liked them a lot and put them on - pics to come.

Also warmed up the sound and removed plastic sound and added a bit of detail. More 'organic'.

I am very pleased, but confused by the colouring issue how it could get past Quality Control.

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Strings ought not to go "boing, bading, bing".

 

This is caused by:

1. Nut slots with an unsmootheness, usually caused by long term contact with wound strings under tension, impressing their windings into the nut. As you tension up, the string moves higher towards the tuners. Instead of moving smoothely, they catch in the grooves, then jump into the next one. When the string jumps, it pings.

 

2. Nut slots too narrow, if you up-sized your strings they could catch in too-narrow nut slots.

 

For 1 or 2 you may need a nut slot re-dressing/resizing.

 

3. Suspended string balls. Make sure when you push the pin home, the ball end is firmly seated against the underside of the sound board and not suspended underneath. If not, it will jump as it pulls out of the hole. This may also cause the pin to rocket out of the hole at some point, allowing the ball end to jump out of the hole.

 

Make sure when you push the pin home that it doesn't grab the string and push it further into the hole, thus suspending the pin. The pin doesn't need to have a TON of pressure applied to keep it in place. Just enough to keep gravity from allowing it to fall out. If the low E string keeps the pin from being pushed in as deeply as the others, no matter. If it's snug, that's good enough.

 

Might also want to check for roughness at the saddle. The string might be jumping as it jumps over or groove on top the saddle. Either have it re-dressed or replace it.

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Strings ought not to go "boing, bading, bing".

 

This is caused by:

1. Nut slots with an unsmootheness, usually caused by long term contact with wound strings under tension, impressing their windings into the nut. As you tension up, the string moves higher towards the tuners. Instead of moving smoothely, they catch in the grooves, then jump into the next one. When the string jumps, it pings.

 

2. Nut slots too narrow, if you up-sized your strings they could catch in too-narrow nut slots.

 

For 1 or 2 you may need a nut slot re-dressing/resizing.

 

3. Suspended string balls. Make sure when you push the pin home, the ball end is firmly seated against the underside of the sound board and not suspended underneath. If not, it will jump as it pulls out of the hole. This may also cause the pin to rocket out of the hole at some point, allowing the ball end to jump out of the hole.

 

Make sure when you push the pin home that it doesn't grab the string and push it further into the hole, thus suspending the pin. The pin doesn't need to have a TON of pressure applied to keep it in place. Just enough to keep gravity from allowing it to fall out. If the low E string keeps the pin from being pushed in as deeply as the others, no matter. If it's snug, that's good enough.

 

Might also want to check for roughness at the saddle. The string might be jumping as it jumps over or groove on top the saddle. Either have it re-dressed or replace it.

 

To ensure the ballend is firmly seated against the bridge plate, when I'm stringing a guitar, I will kink the ballend of the string just about 1/2" above the ball. This will give it some angle towards the headstock. Then slide the string and the pin into the hole, seat the pin firmly and then pull straight up to seat the ball against the bridge plate.

 

DSCF1156.jpg

DSCF1157.jpg

DSCF1158.jpg

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No, no, no. He said, "baddinngg, baaading, boing, boing, boing". Not, "boing, bading, bing".

 

Good info though.

 

But, better than, "kerpling, ferplang, kerplack, beriiing". That would suck. but you get to "bing, badabing, badabang, badaboom", then you good.

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To ensure the ballend is firmly seated against the bridge plate, when I'm stringing a guitar, I will kink the ballend of the string just about 1/2" above the ball. This will give it some angle towards the headstock. Then slide the string and the pin into the hole, seat the pin firmly and then pull straight up to seat the ball against the bridge plate.

 

<snip pics>

 

+1

 

 

Nice pics Drath . . . . I use the same method.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just took 6 snow-white bone pins from a 15 hour bath and placed them in the Hummingbird bridge. They had been lying in Kashmir Tchai with honey and salt over night and reached a point where they match the TV bindings perfectly.

 

The S because they recommend that when you dye clothes (no scientific explanation in this context).

 

The H because I made the bath from a cup I drank myself, , , and of course for the honeyglazed voice of the Bird.

 

Wonder if they'll stay darkened after playing it a while. We'll see.

 

Next move is another set of snow-bones – this time for the vintage 45, , , and in Nicaraguan coffee.

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Just took 6 snow-white bone pins from a 15 hour bath and placed them in the Hummingbird bridge. They had been lying in Kashmir Tchai with honey and salt over night and reached a point where they match the TV bindings perfectly.

 

The S because they recommend that when you dye clothes (no scientific explanation in this context).

 

The H because I made the bath from a cup I drank myself, , , and of course for the honeyglazed voice of the Bird.

 

Wonder if they'll stay darkened after playing it a while. We'll see.

 

Next move is another set of snow-bones – this time for the vintage 45, , , and in Nicaraguan coffee.

 

What? No pictures?

 

 

 

Salty mixtures have a tendency to move towards areas of lower salt concentration. If the cloth and/or bone material has a certain saltiness, it might repel the dye. Adding salt causes the mixture to move into the desired stainee material, taking the dye with it.

 

Honey? Is just plain weird, but honey should make the pins more palatable to your cats. [scared] (Who have been known along with their canine co-habitators, to have a taste for bone objects)

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