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Thing is, if I was a bluegrasser, I'd be tempted not to use a D-28 or other accepted Martin model as that's what all the bluegrass players tend to use, why would I want my sound, or our collective sound to be strikingly similar to every other bluegrass mob out there?

The other thing I found odd is that the pioneers who influenced and started the bluegrass thing half the time, or most of the time, played Gibsons.

 

EDIT: while I take an interest, and have read up on it, I am not an expert on Bluegrass and I can't play it very well at all.

 

I don't know how to use a pick.

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What ever you do...DON'T turn up to a Bluegrass jam with a Gibson. You have to have a Martin D-28 - preferably from the 40s! Turn up with a Taylor, and they will treat you like a Les Paul guy! The

Any acoustic-electric guitar will do. but get a LOUD AMP! a guitar will only sound loud as much as you make it sound loud.

Amps on the other hand, and blast them banjos away! [thumbup]

 

something like this might help [flapper]

800px-MarshallStack_Slayer.jpg

 

Wow! You can use any uke and plug it on this wall of speakers; that will take care of those banjos! :lol:

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I have lost count of the number of guitars described as a "banjo killer" in my lifetime. Thing is, I have yet to hear a geetar that was un-mic'd or without a pickup that could beat down a banjo.

 

As someone noted what the bluegrass guys seem to really dig is not only volume but the booming low end of a good Martin dread.

 

If you wanted to think a bit outside the box and stand out in the crowd - you could always snag something like a Harmony Sovereign and have the bracing redone. Based on how good they sound stock, it might just out-Martin a Martin.

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I agree as I own one myself but I still neeed MORE VOLUME

 

Moose

 

P.S. Loudest one I ever owned was a Kalamazoo arch top-wish I had it now

 

 

Where have you been young man?

 

I thought this was an old thread

 

Nice to hear from you here, made me come out of infrequent lurking

 

Fred sends love to Nou Nou!

 

J

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This topic is of great interest to me because I regularly drag my square shouldered J45 to bluegrass jams. If it's a circle of more than 8-10 players, forget it. I can't hear the other D28's if the banjos are on the rampage. Typically with a large group, I'll just concentrate on making music with the players directly on each side of me. Playing loud in that setting takes some adjustments no matter what you are playing. I use a very stiff pick with medium strings. I don't use a lot hammers and pull offs. I run my breaks up the neck where I feel my treble cuts through. I actually get a lot of complements for my guitar at jams. Yeah yeah yeah, the square shoulder j45 is overbraced, but it is just short of 40 years old. It has pretty nice tone for an old guitar. I think I have the same or better volume than the new J45's I've tested in stores. I wonder if the square shoulder design might help in the volume department. I've thought about what one poster commented about why use what every one else is playing and sound just like them. I really think that each player is significantly different as to make what ever guitar they are playing sound different. I hear the same model guitar at different volumes depending on how it's played more so than what it is. Of course my dream is that if I played better, other folks in the jam would turn down the volume just to hear me.

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Where have you been young man?

 

I thought this was an old thread

 

Nice to hear from you here, made me come out of infrequent lurking

 

Fred sends love to Nou Nou!

 

J

 

Sir Johnt:

 

Greetings and salutations to an "infrequent lurker" (doing this here could probably get you a nicely confined free vacation)

I must have struck a nerve with this thread including yourself who probably needs a volume booster due to

Fred's lovesick calls for NouNou. I am seriously happy to know you are alive and hopefully still happily HUMMING AND STRUMMING.

I also trust that you will be still available to continue your superior board memebership activities in

behalf of the PISS POOR PICKING ACADEMY Of ADVANCE GUITAR TECHNIQUES. Ever since we lost our financial backing

from the local cartel due to their finding mostly sober roaches in the student's watered tequila which they supply, thingies have have been going from worst to rotten.

 

The BEST best to you and yours and a big hug to Fred from NouNou

 

Moose

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What ever you do...DON'T turn up to a Bluegrass jam with a Gibson.

You have to have a Martin D-28 - preferably from the 40s!

 

Well, I play in a bluegrass band! I play my Gibson All the time! (my SongBird, it's rosewood) At first I caught the sneers and jeers from the ol' timers, but after they gave my Gibby a go they were amazed at the volume and sound from it. In fact, I've had a few die-hard Martin pickers break a string during performances and ask to play my Gibby the rest of their set!!! Most of the Martin fanatics, I've found, just have never played a Gibson guitar. It's just that people stereo-type bluegrass music and Martin guitars! But I'm blazin' a trail with my Gibsons through the dark, dark world of bluegrass music!!!

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My money is on Keef's Sea Turtle Guitar.

 

KeefSeaTurtleGuitar-1.jpg

 

Dude, anybody can tell that's a sea-turtle stand-up bass. I'm just waitin' for Keef to be playin' Jack Sparrow's J-200 in the next movie.

 

And I thought my J-45 had a fancy headstock!

headstock1.jpg

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Moosey!! So good to *see* you again [wub] !!

 

My vote is ADVANCED JUMBO! Just throw a paper bag over the headstock and blow 'em away with the sound. Yeah, the purists might notice the little arrowheads on the fretboard but so what!! [biggrin]

 

I must tell my standard banjo joke here:

What's the difference between a n onion and a banjo?

 

 

 

 

 

 

No one ever cried when you cut up a banjo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I really need to get some new material

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Karen, no need for new material. Just consider yourself a preserver of tradition. B)

 

As for guitar volume, I agree that a lot is involved beyond the make and model. I'm really amazed by how much difference pick choice can make in the volume. Set up, string choice, and just the variation within the same model line also are important. However, I did sell an HD28V because it was simply too loud for my type of music. That model really projects. Also the one D18 authentic I've played had incredible volume. My J-45 has more than enough volume, but is not as loud as either of the Martins.

 

In bluegrass, I don't feel the guitar as rhythm instrument needs to overpower or compete with the banjo. The guitar is important, but it really isn't the defining sound of bluegrass. During any bluegrass break it is the responsibility of the other players to back off if necessary to make the overall sound good.

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Loudest guitars I've ever owned were a Lowden F-35 and a Martin D-18 Golden Era. Must say that my Advanced Jumbo gets the job done pretty well also, and I play bluegrass all the time. Bring a Gibson to the jam just to be contrary... and prove to the ignorant that the AJ is as good a bluegrass guitar as any. Just ask Randy Scruggs. Somebody posted about Collings... seriously? They are a myth promoted by the folks that have paid too much for them. If you want a traditional dreadnought, save some money and buy a Martin.

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The one below is louder than hell! - gypsy jazzers were made to cut out above the rest of the band/ensemble. They make great all round guitars too, my wife has accompanied herself singing Simon and Garfunkle and Richard Thompson songs.

 

Royal1.jpg

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And I thought my J-45 had a fancy headstock!

headstock1.jpg

No worry – it will easily and soon make you a genuine flag officer in The Royal English Fleet.

 

It is with h-stocks like this you from Portuguese ports in the Caribbean sea head out hunting types like J. Sparrow and Cap. Blackbeard.

 

Only eventually to become a naval commander yourself – on a proud reborn dreadnought !

 

 

My link

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I have two Martin dreads, as well as a J-45TV and an AJ. The AJ is the loudest of the bunch. I have no experience with bluegrass or banjos, but if I'm not mistaken Gibson specifically designed the AJ to compete with the Martin dreads.

 

The AJ appeals to me for several reasons. First and most importantly, it sounds fantastic, but it also looks incredibly good and comes with a great hertige and tons of tradition.

 

So the AJ is what I would look at first if I were you.

 

Lars

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GGGIRL:

 

JUST WHEN I THOUGHT I HAD FOUND TRUE LOVE AND PSST YOU WERE GONE (ALA HEE HAW) I AM SO HAPPY TO KNOW YOU HAVE NOT

ZAPPED ME FROM YOUR MEMORY BANK. HOPE THAT LIFE IS TREATING YOU WELL AND THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES WHICH I HAVE YET TO HAVE.

 

MOOSE

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The one below is louder than hell! - gypsy jazzers were made to cut out above the rest of the band/ensemble. They make great all round guitars too, my wife has accompanied herself singing Simon and Garfunkle and Richard Thompson songs.

 

Royal1.jpg

 

Mathew: This could be an answer to them thar banjoes-what make guitar is this and does it come all steel string?-the photo

makes it look like some are gut type?

 

Moose

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Mathew: This could be an answer to them thar banjoes-what make guitar is this and does it come all steel string?-the photo

makes it look like some are gut type?

 

Moose

 

Hi Moose

 

The guitar is made by an English gypsy jazz luthier named Roy Eneas, it is steel strung, but some of the original Macafferri guitars did have nylon strings I believe. Mario Macafferri I only found out recently when I rented DVD account of Django's life, was actually a classical guitarist!

 

I assumed like many that he was a jazzer at heart, but apparently not!

 

Matt

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Hi Moose

 

The guitar is made by an English gypsy jazz luthier named Roy Eneas, it is steel strung, but some of the original Macafferri guitars did have nylon strings I believe. Mario Macafferri I only found out recently when I rented DVD account of Django's life, was actually a classical guitarist!

 

I assumed like many that he was a jazzer at heart, but apparently not!

 

Matt

Mathew: Many thanks for your most appreciated luthier info on you wife's great guitar-Another question if I might: What kind of wood including the top is this instrument made of? Is it a laminated side & back or solid throughout?

I thank you in advance for the information

 

Regards,

 

Moose

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