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ES 335 Neck repair....should I buy?


johnny_uk

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Hi Guys

I need some serious advice. I have just seen a Gibson ES 335 1995 Sunburst, made in the Nashville plant.

 

In the past it has had a neck repair. It looks like dowels were inserted at the peghead end to re-enforce it.

The serial and Made in USA are still visible on the headstock + the serial matches the sticker in the soundhole. It plays beautifully and I have been offered it for next to nothing.

 

Any advice on guitars that have had a neck repair? This is what the guy has said

 

"Serial number 922053xx and it matches the label in the f-hole. Made in USA is visable. The repair is really tidy with no over-spray. I bought the guitar about 6 months ago, I got it from a guy who was a jazz musician who was retiring, he bought it from a fellow musician from the States who'd had the neck repair done. So I personally don't know who did the repair. It is totally solid and hasn't caused me any problems at all. The truss rod say Standard, which I assume would have come from a Les Paul? I had it professionally set up recently and the intonation is fine. There are no major issues - except the neck repair - to speak of, it's a soild 335 that'll go on forever

The only issue is it's had a neck repair at some point - if you look closely at the pics you can see where the luthier has inserted dowels to strengthen the headstock. Some say a guitar that has had a neck repair is stronger than ones that haven't!? "

 

 

What do you think??

 

Thanks

 

Johnny

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On most guitars, the only effect a neck repair will have is resale value. As LPCA said, if the price is right go for it.

 

I usually stay away from guitars with headstock repairs but that's because guys always seem to asking almost full price for them. If the guy selling this one is willing to be the one to take the hit on resale value, then personally, I'd jump on it NOW!!!

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Any experienced repairman can almost make a living on Gibson neck repairs. It's a common problem with them, and not an indication of a weak neck.

 

If the repair was done properly, it will be stronger than the original. If it's got a low price, I'd say Go for it!

 

I just bought an ES-335, and I'm wondering why I waited so long. Nice guitars.

 

That burst on the neck is the usual pattern, I believe.

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Thanks guys....Im gonna go for it if it's still available. Will let you know the outcome.

 

ps your right about the neck finish. Although all the figured 335's I saw on the internet...the burst finished at the heel of the neck and did not continue onto the headstock. I have since seen one though at http://www.provide.net/~cfh/es335.html second pic from bottom

 

Johnny

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Hi Guys

I need some serious advice. I have just seen a Gibson ES 335 1995 Sunburst' date=' made in the Nashville plant.

 

In the past it has had a neck repair. It looks like dowels were inserted at the peghead end to re-enforce it.

The serial and Made in USA are still visible on the headstock + the serial matches the sticker in the soundhole. It plays beautifully and I have been offered it for next to nothing.

 

Any advice on guitars that have had a neck repair? This is what the guy has said

 

"Serial number 922053xx and it matches the label in the f-hole. Made in USA is visable. The repair is really tidy with no over-spray. I bought the guitar about 6 months ago, I got it from a guy who was a jazz musician who was retiring, he bought it from a fellow musician from the States who'd had the neck repair done. So I personally don't know who did the repair. It is totally solid and hasn't caused me any problems at all. The truss rod say Standard, which I assume would have come from a Les Paul? I had it professionally set up recently and the intonation is fine. There are no major issues - except the neck repair - to speak of, it's a soild 335 that'll go on forever

The only issue is it's had a neck repair at some point - if you look closely at the pics you can see where the luthier has inserted dowels to strengthen the headstock. Some say a guitar that has had a neck repair is stronger than ones that haven't!? "

 

 

What do you think??

 

Thanks

 

Johnny[/quote']

 

I owned a 1973 les paul deluxe with a replaced headstock... I got it for $950.... And it turned out to be an oustanding guitar... Absoulutely no issues with the headstock.... I would say if its below $1400 US, and has all the original parts, buy it.

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Well unfortunately it was not to be...someone else beat me to it. Still I'm having fun looking. I can't wait for the next adventure...hehe

 

Thanks again for all the advice you gave

 

Johnny

 

Too bad. There's a time and place for impulsiveness. I bought my ES-335 last week after casually browsing Craig's List and finding it freshly posted. I called and left a message on Sunday' date=' and picked it up Wednesday. It looked good in the pic, played well and sounded like a 335, and I got it for what amounts to half price.

 

[img']http://i345.photobucket.com/albums/p362/lpdeluxe1/GibsonES-335.jpg?t=1223588752[/img]

 

It's a little lighter than the picture, which was taken with an overhead incandescent light; it also has a nice figure in the top that doesn't show up.

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Too bad. There's a time and place for impulsiveness. I bought my ES-335 last week after casually browsing Craig's List and finding it freshly posted. I called and left a message on Sunday' date=' and picked it up Wednesday. It looked good in the pic, played well and sounded like a 335, and I got it for what amounts to half price.

 

[img']http://i345.photobucket.com/albums/p362/lpdeluxe1/GibsonES-335.jpg?t=1223588752[/img]

 

It's a little lighter than the picture, which was taken with an overhead incandescent light; it also has a nice figure in the top that doesn't show up.

 

With the economy the way it is now you are bound to find some great deals on Craig's list and Ebay... On just about anything you may be looking for!!! Don't rush to buy anything unless its a great deal, another one will come on line soon just as good if not better...

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Thanks guys. I always think it's because a better guitar is going to come along....but man it is so frustrating and easy to just go out and buy the first guitar you see lol.

Anyway Im not going to rush...it will turn up eventualy

 

Thanks again to everyone for the fantastic advice you all give

 

Johnny

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With the economy the way it is now you are bound to find some great deals on Craig's list and Ebay... On just about anything you may be looking for!!! Don't rush to buy anything unless its a great deal' date=' another one will come on line soon just as good if not better...[/quote']

 

That's what I say, but in this case, judging from the house and the neighborhood, the guy was not hurting for money -- if he were, he had plenty of much more valuable assets laying around to peddle. When I went to look at the guitar, I followed his wife's new Suburban from the wrought-iron gate up the hill to their home. She had an alpaca in the back seat: she explained that her other alpaca was lonesome. What I paid for the 335 would be a drop in the bucket against his expenses.

 

He said he was selling the Gibson because he couldn't make it play as easy as his Taylor nylon string. It had medium gauge flat-wounds, and the tailpiece was screwed all the way down, so my diagnosis was "unclear on the concept."

 

Such deals are independent of the economy; but if the economy were bad, he wouldn't have blown $3K on a guitar he didn't play in the first place.

 

In any case, I am delighted to have it. I've replaced the strings with .012 roundwounds (wound third) and it has come to life. I may raise the tailpiece but it's playing pretty good right now.

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Hi Guys, thought I'd finish off johnny's saga for him.

I was the one who pipped him at the post on ebay and I've just recieved the guitar today.

The necks very solid. In fact you have to look really closely to see it. and the guy

who sold it was right; It's a real bargain ands sounds absolutely gorgeous to play .

Well done that man!:)

 

 

Geoff.

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Hi Guys' date=' thought I'd finish off johnny's saga for him.

I was the one who pipped him at the post on ebay and I've just recieved the guitar today.

The necks very solid. In fact you have to look really closely to see it. and the guy

who sold it was right; It's a real bargain ands sounds absolutely gorgeous to play .

Well done that man!:)

Johnny's loss my Gain..He,He,He.

 

Geoff.

[/quote']

 

You know the rule: no pic, no guitar.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hi Guys

I need some serious advice. I have just seen a Gibson ES 335 1995 Sunburst' date=' made in the Nashville plant.

 

In the past it has had a neck repair. It looks like dowels were inserted at the peghead end to re-enforce it.

The serial and Made in USA are still visible on the headstock + the serial matches the sticker in the soundhole. It plays beautifully and I have been offered it for next to nothing.

 

Any advice on guitars that have had a neck repair? This is what the guy has said

 

"Serial number 922053xx and it matches the label in the f-hole. Made in USA is visable. The repair is really tidy with no over-spray. I bought the guitar about 6 months ago, I got it from a guy who was a jazz musician who was retiring, he bought it from a fellow musician from the States who'd had the neck repair done. So I personally don't know who did the repair. It is totally solid and hasn't caused me any problems at all. The truss rod say Standard, which I assume would have come from a Les Paul? I had it professionally set up recently and the intonation is fine. There are no major issues - except the neck repair - to speak of, it's a soild 335 that'll go on forever

The only issue is it's had a neck repair at some point - if you look closely at the pics you can see where the luthier has inserted dowels to strengthen the headstock. Some say a guitar that has had a neck repair is stronger than ones that haven't!? "

 

 

What do you think??

 

Thanks

 

Johnny

 

[/quote']

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I have a couple of Gibson's a les paul which is stellar and a less than a week old

Gibson 1959 ES-335 dot reissue. I have had my regular tech and a new tech both look

at it as the tuning problem is driving me insane. I can't play a gig with it because of the tuning

issue. Both agree that it is not a binding issue but I can hear the grovers click when I turn them

and the B and G drop almost a full note! I have a bone nut in there now and I hate the tusk because they

are so bright. Any ideas would be really appreciatted. I just joined up today. If you want to hear my

Les Paul try my website www.guitarmyway.com

 

The guitar is a beautiful vintage sunburst and these things are not cheap! I also have a revered club king rt for $699

and that guitar is unreal, it has never gone out of tune in a year and it sits in my studio most of the time. Most of the reviews I have read on this guitar say don't take it to your tech, they will wreck it. Apparently there is one guy there that just sets up guitars and he is GOOD. Right now I am longing to play my ES 335. Help!

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Hi Johnnie,

It seems there's more to guitar this than first met the eye.

 

This is now a tale of caution:- =P~

When I said the guitar was georgeous to play. I meant I really like it's tone.

The guitar itself when it arrived had a loose scratch plate, a dodgy jack plug socket.

The back of the neck felt like somebody's wash board where they had just been slumping

the guitar against whatever. and the actually neck repair - though solid looked semi amaturish

around the edges, and the bodywork had the usual scratches and a large what I thought

was a crack in the laquer by the jack socket. The metal work was very tarnished. and the high E string

was buzzing against the top fret.

So I actually wondered if I'd made a giant Boo Boo.

I took the strings back off it and the metal work and set about trying to restore it to some of it's former

glory.

It's amazing what a tin of T-cut ( car paint restorer) and a tube of auto autosol can do. ( metal polish).

and lemon oil.

It took two days to bring the laquer finish back up, remove the ripples in the back of the neck

and find the crack was a blemish. which has all but gone and there isn't a scratch left to show.

The metal took care of the tarnish and the lemon oil (Gibson's) brought the fretboard back up.

 

Now the cautionary bit.....Yestarday I took the now prestine looking guitar to my local guitar

shop to get it set up properly...only to be informed the neck has warped where the so called

professional neck repair was done. So I'm a little peaved after all my hard word, but I have found

a luthier who can fix it for a price, so now I'm saving up to get it done as...Yes you've guessed I

really taken to the guitar.

So Johnnie....Be very very careful when thinking of buying gibson 335's with broken / repaired headstocks.....

I'm eating humble pie at the moment.eusa_silenced.gif

If I can workout how to upload a pic I'll put it on!

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Hi Johnnie,

It seems there's more to this guitar than first met the eye.

 

This is now a tale of caution:- =P~

When I said the guitar was gorgeous to play. I meant I really like it's tone.

The guitar itself when it arrived had a loose scratch plate, a dodgy jack plug socket.

The back of the neck felt like somebody's wash board where they had just been slumping

the guitar against whatever. and the actually neck repair - though solid, semi amaturish

around the edges, and the bodywork had the usual scratches and a large what I thought

was a crack in the laquer by the jack socket. The metal work was very tarnished. and the high E string

was buzzing against the top fret.

So I actually wondered if I'd made a giant Boo Boo.

I took the strings back off it and the metal work and set about trying to restore it to some of it's former

glory.

It's amazing what a tin of T-cut ( car paint restorer) a tube of auto autosol ( metal polish)and lemon oil can do.

 

It took two days to bring the laquer finish back up, remove the ripples in the back of the neck

and find the crack was a blemish. which has all but gone and there isn't a scratch left to show.

The metal polish took care of the tarnish and the lemon oil (Gibson's) brought the fretboard back up.

 

Now the cautionary bit.....Yestarday I took the now pristine looking guitar to my local guitar

shop to get it set up properly...only to be informed the neck has warped where the so called

professional neck repair was done. So I'm a little peaved after all my hard word, but I have found

a luthier who can fix it for a price, so now I'm saving up to get it done as...Yes you've guessed it I've

really taken to the guitar.

So Johnnie....Be very very careful when thinking of buying gibson 335's with broken / repaired headstocks.....

I'm eating humble pie at the moment.eusa_silenced.gif

If I can workout how to upload a pic I'll put it on!

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