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Strange Les Paul


blue meanie

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hi all

 

first post here from Paris, France and please forgive my bad english

I'm a 44 years old amateur guitarist and have just found this strange LP on the street. It seems to be an Artist model with no electronics.

 

It's pretty damaged but the serial number gives me :

Nashville Plant, TN, USA

October 17th, 1979

Production Number: 38

 

I have no clue about this guitar and some even says that it's not a real one.

 

What do you think ?

 

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It is an Artist model with Moog electronics. It appears that when it was being used as a playing instrument, it was modified by removing the Moog electronics and made to work as a normal Les Paul.

 

The construction details like the headstock and body shape are consistent with being genuine. So is the hardware.

 

I see nothing to suggest it was a fake.

 

It is a true shame it was cut in half. If someone did that because they thought it was a fake, they were likely mistaking the not often seen electronics. Perhaps an angry spouse?

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It is an Artist model with Moog electronics. It appears that when it was being used as a playing instrument, it was modified by removing the Moog electronics and made to work as a normal Les Paul.

 

The construction details like the headstock and body shape are consistent with being genuine. So is the hardware.

 

I see nothing to suggest it was a fake.

 

It is a true shame it was cut in half. If someone did that because they thought it was a fake, they were likely mistaking the not often seen electronics. Perhaps an angry spouse?

 

the angry spouse's answer comes often. I don't know. It came with à cheap acoustic guitar and two amps : a marshall and a carlsbro.

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Maybe the person who had the guitar considered it to be too damaged to play so they were going to make it into an ornamental piece?

 

BUt the strange thing is there are pieces of guitar string still on the machine heads so someone may have chopped it for some other sinister reason.

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Yep that was an Artist model, too bad about the damage, Gibson could fix the neck but they probably don't have any nos moog boards in stock to replace the electronics but man that would be cool

 

I agree it would be a cool guitar to own.

 

QUESTION:-

What exactly did the Moog electronics do?\

Was it like some built in effects processor?

If so what sounds did it make?

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you need a real good inventive luthier to take that on, personally with the clean cut on the neck i would say its pretty much a lost cause (probably why it was left in the street) if it was a snapped break then it could be glued back together but there is nothing for the two halves to connect to and you would need to remove the fretboard to replace the truss rod too.

 

I'm thinking at a desperate attempt you could attempt a wooden dowel method but even then I think the stringed up tension would either snap the neck again or constantly go out of tune.

 

real shame hang it on the wall!

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It wouldn't be a cheap-fix but the existing neck could be removed fairly easily (BY A LUTHIER!) and a replacement obtained and set-in.

 

QUESTION:-

What exactly did the Moog electronics do?\

Was it like some built in effects processor?

If so what sounds did it make?

 

The guitar would originally have had only three knobs; the one which normally operates as the neck-pup tone control being replaced by a mini toggle - of which there were three. The other two were where the small black blanks are in the first snap.

 

To quote from Tony Bacon's Les Paul book;

"The knobs control Volume, Bass and Treble. The switches control Brightness, Expansion and Compression."

 

As far as tone goes, from the same book;

"Many guitarists disliked the active circuitry, which could be harsher than regular tone controls..."

 

Finally, from the same source, to quote from Gibson's own Tim Shaw (the person most responsible for the Artist model entering production);

"We had to redesign the circuit board because the original RD board is too big for almost anything. So we transferred the circuitry into two boards, which still meant we had to take a lot of wood out of the Artist guitars. But something I didn't fully appreciate until later was that guitar players are really conservative folks, and nobody really wanted a Les Paul that did all that. Somebody once said that with one of those Artists, you were a flick of a switch away from total disaster."

 

I wouldn't bother about the Moog circuitry. No great loss.

 

Nice colour body, BTW.

 

P.

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I have contacted a luthier in Paris.

To change the neck it would cost about 1 500 €.

I don't know if it's interesting ...

 

A quick search using Google shows the price a working LP Artist would normally fetch to be about $2,900 - or €2,000 (in the USA; It would probably be higher in Europe).

 

The luthier you contacted quotes 25% less than this just to replace the neck. Once this is done you would need to find a tailpiece. It originally came with a TP-6 but if you are not after originality - and the lack of Moog circuitry makes this almost a certainty - a regular Stoptail would do. Then, from the look of things in the pictures, you would need a neck p-up as there seems to be nothing under that cover!

 

When all this is done you will have a very nice looking, but non-original, instrument. Originality is very desirable, value-wise, if you ever plan to sell it sometime in the future.

 

Then again; you would have a very unusual Custom-built Les Paul for, say, €1,700 which is still a reasonably good deal.

 

Perhaps you could try a non-Paris based luthier? Their overheads - and therefore the final cost of repair - might be lower.

 

EDIT : There is an all-original one (but with active-board problems) on ebay at this very moment for $1,999 - €1,402 - £1,238...

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item53e87fd9f1

 

P.

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