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can electricity travel through a banana?

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I think either DAMIAN and OVERTHERAINBOW are correct, or maybe...

 

How many guitarist does it take to change a lightbulb? 40.

 

One to get a ladder, go up the ladder, remove the old bulb, put in a new one, climb down the ladder and put it away. And 39 to say, "I can do that".

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I think either DAMIAN and OVERTHERAINBOW are correct, or maybe...

 

How many guitarist does it take to change a lightbulb? 40.

 

One to get a ladder, go up the ladder, remove the old bulb, put in a new one, climb down the ladder and put it away. And 39 to say, "I can do that".

 

[thumbup] [thumbup] [thumbup] ......How many LEAD guitarests does it take to change a light bulb ??? 40; One to change it and 39 to say that they could have done it better.....

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It's got nothing to do with the banana. If touching it causes an open circuit to close, you've got a loose connection. Loose connections lead to heat, which can lead to fire.

 

Get the fixture fixed or replaced already.

 

[sneaky]

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Speaking of bananas, we bought a bunch of green bananas about 2 weeks ago and they still aren't ripe! What's up with that? :-k

 

Because they are actually Plantains?

 

Either that or a practical joker has been out with the spray-paint in your grocery stall?

 

Just a guess.......

 

P.

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a banana conducts electricity but I think I can explain why, in general terms. You can think of a banana, or most fruits, as being mostly water and its electrical conductivity will be related to conductivity of water solutions. You probably also did an experiment with water and various things (such as sugar and salt) dissolved in it. Some solutions conduct and others do not. Those that do form ions in solution, for example salt is sodium chloride (NaCl) and, because of the properties of salt and water (a polar solvent), dissolves as Na+ (sodium atom missing one electron) and Cl- (chlorine atom with an extra electron -- chloride ion). Once in solution with many other Na+ and Cl- ions around the individual ions are free to move around in the solution, independent of one another. When you measure the conductivity of the solution you are applying an electric potential, positive charge at one electrode and negative charge at the other. The positively charged ions will be attracted to the negatively charged electrode and the negatively charged ions will be attracted to the positively charged electrode. When a negative ion reaches the positive electrode it deposits its electron in the electrode, the electron travels through the meter and appears at the negatively charged electrode to move onto the positively charged ion, neutralizing it. Salts & acids form ionic solutions so fruits like oranges (citric acid) and bananas (potassium salts??) can conduct in this manner.

 

my question is answered [biggrin]

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a banana conducts electricity but I think I can explain why, in general terms. You can think of a banana, or most fruits, as being mostly water and its electrical conductivity will be related to conductivity of water solutions. You probably also did an experiment with water and various things (such as sugar and salt) dissolved in it. Some solutions conduct and others do not. Those that do form ions in solution, for example salt is sodium chloride (NaCl) and, because of the properties of salt and water (a polar solvent), dissolves as Na+ (sodium atom missing one electron) and Cl- (chlorine atom with an extra electron -- chloride ion). Once in solution with many other Na+ and Cl- ions around the individual ions are free to move around in the solution, independent of one another. When you measure the conductivity of the solution you are applying an electric potential, positive charge at one electrode and negative charge at the other. The positively charged ions will be attracted to the negatively charged electrode and the negatively charged ions will be attracted to the positively charged electrode. When a negative ion reaches the positive electrode it deposits its electron in the electrode, the electron travels through the meter and appears at the negatively charged electrode to move onto the positively charged ion, neutralizing it. Salts & acids form ionic solutions so fruits like oranges (citric acid) and bananas (potassium salts??) can conduct in this manner.

 

my question is answered [biggrin]

 

So, in brief, what you are saying STEVE, is that, because bananas DO conduct electricity, that this is why they always bunch together ???? :unsure: [crying] :blink: ...

 

And that when bananas lose their conductivity, that this is when you get banana splits ???? :blink: [woot][huh] ...

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just got home and swithed the said lights on and BANG! blew the fuse and the bulb exploded bits of glass all over the kitchen [scared]

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just got home and swithed the said lights on and BANG! blew the fuse and the bulb exploded bits of glass all over the kitchen [scared]

Oh god... run!

tumblr_m0hzf0ESuX1qmdmcd.gif

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Bananas are loaded with potassium. As such they WILL conduct electricity. In fact they may, as a potato does, generate their own electricity.

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:o

 

toysmith-potato-clock.jpg

 

Would that clock be using two "P" cell batteries?

 

(P-otato, get it?)

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a banana conducts electricity but I think I can explain why, in general terms. You can think of a banana, or most fruits, as being mostly water and its electrical conductivity will be related to conductivity of water solutions. You probably also did an experiment with water and various things (such as sugar and salt) dissolved in it. Some solutions conduct and others do not. Those that do form ions in solution, for example salt is sodium chloride (NaCl) and, because of the properties of salt and water (a polar solvent), dissolves as Na+ (sodium atom missing one electron) and Cl- (chlorine atom with an extra electron -- chloride ion). Once in solution with many other Na+ and Cl- ions around the individual ions are free to move around in the solution, independent of one another. When you measure the conductivity of the solution you are applying an electric potential, positive charge at one electrode and negative charge at the other. The positively charged ions will be attracted to the negatively charged electrode and the negatively charged ions will be attracted to the positively charged electrode. When a negative ion reaches the positive electrode it deposits its electron in the electrode, the electron travels through the meter and appears at the negatively charged electrode to move onto the positively charged ion, neutralizing it. Salts & acids form ionic solutions so fruits like oranges (citric acid) and bananas (potassium salts??) can conduct in this manner.

 

my question is answered [biggrin]

many years ago in reform school, rather high school in basic elec.the teach asked whats the best conductor? we all gave some answer!then he stated all things are conductors depending on the voltage applied! I E lightning thru the air! [crying]

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