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Heilly

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This might be of interest.........

 

 

How a Restored '62 Gibson SG Special Gave New Life to Veteran George Inman

 

The Restoration Process Begins

 

With some reluctance and even more prodding, George finally gave in and let McGuire take the guitar back home with him to North Carolina, where he would soon realize that the job of restoring such a valued instrument would probably be better left to pros. That's when he contacted Todd Money, manager at Gibson's Repair and Restoration department, who explained the processes and time involved in restoring an instrument in the condition of George's prized SG.

 

"This was a very difficult project to do," Money said. "Any time there's been any type of amateur finishing work done, it's usually a big problem. This SG had bondo on it, the original contours of the guitar had been sanded down at some point and had to be reconfigured by hand to look correct again. It really created some problems for us."

 

Fortunately, they weren't problems that couldn't be overcome. After all, this was basically the same team that had restored the historic 1923 Gibson F-5 mandolin belonging to legendary bluegrass picker Bill Monroe an instrument that had been smashed to smithereens with a fireplace poker by an irate woman, and which now hangs in the permanent collection of the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tenn. Money knew the shop faced an uphill battle with George's SG, but not an insurmountable one.

 

"This guitar needed a little bit of everything, so it was going to take a little bit of time to do it all," Money said.

 

 

With the blessing of McGuire and George's son Stewart and without telling George Money and his team began the laborious process of restoring the SG. Repair and Restoration's Dave Simmonds was assigned as lead tech for the project. Everything was eventually repaired and restored to its original condition, including one of the pickups that needed to be rewound, the body and jack plate that needed to be reconfigured, the once-repaired cracked headstock and, of course, its original alpine white finish. It took many long hours and a little more than one year to finish the job, but time and money were no object to McGuire and Stewart. Their only concern was restoring George's fire and passion for something that had once meant so much to him.

 

www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/ProductSpotlight/RepairAndRestoration/Repair%20Stories/...

 

 

Plenty of stories in gibson lifestyle on repair and restoration.

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From the pics, it looks like a studio in my opinion.... unless someone with more experience with these tells me different.... anyone know?

The 2001 catalog lists it as a "LP Smartwood Exotic", without the Studio moniker.

Specs:

-Certified exotic carved top

-Certified mahogany back & neck

-Fingerboard: Chechin w/dots

-490/498 pickups

-Clear satin finish

 

This guitar looks very similar to a new Smartwood (Muir Wood body) I considered buying back around '03. Ended up not being that impressed with it & bought a Swamp Ash Studio instead (which later got traded in for a 339). At any rate, for around $500, this guitar is really not worth the potential headache, imho. It's fairly equivalent to a faded Studio model, and it's a god awful mess! How much time, effort, and money will go into turning this back into a slightly glorified Studio?

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I can see both points of the arguement.

 

if $500 is what he is asking for then for your peice of mind offer him less if he accepts ok if not then thats your mind made up. it will be alot of work, personally i do this work for extra income and already have the tools materials and experience so would grab the bull by the horns and get stuck in.

 

The headstock is a concern as that is holly over mahogany with a silkscreen logo. sand that at your own risk as you wont get another silkscreen without sending the guitar to gibson restore workshop.

 

IMO find out what he used to glue all that on, also note that all that extra gunk on the finish could possibly effect the tone of the guitar.

 

look at the headstock area again, notice the white parts on the glue/substance. it looks like peeling candle wax as there seems to be air underneath it (as opposed to the pure black) could it be seperating? dificult to say without seeing it in person.

 

looks like he has painted the hardware gold too.

 

the smartwood logo on the back of the neck joint really does resemble the custom shop logo, I learnt something new!

 

on another note, due to all the pictures of his family on it an the obvious sentimental value, you gotta ask yourself........why is he selling it? 'if' i had done that to a Gibson and wanted to re-sell it i wouldn't do so with pictures of my family on there i'd have to try and remove them.

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on another note, due to all the pictures of his family on it an the obvious sentimental value, you gotta ask yourself........why is he selling it? 'if' i had done that to a Gibson and wanted to re-sell it i wouldn't do so with pictures of my family on there i'd have to try and remove them.

 

Thanks for the input Angellus. The guitar (and all of the other circus show gear) was part of a storage locker auction. Basically the owner of the guitar didn't pay the monthly dues. When that happens, the storage facility auctions off the entire contents.

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I am planning on looking at the guitar this weekend. I have talked him down to $300 and told him that is the absolute highest I would pay. Wish me luck this weekend. wink.gif

I am hoping to pick it up for $200.

 

Even $300 is a great deal but good luck anyway!

 

And that Squier Stallio-caster shows there's someone with even less taste than the person who restyled the Gibbie! (BTW the white fur guitar is, of course, owned by the Rev. Billy F. Gibbons, Esquire).

 

P.

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Thanks for the input Angellus. The guitar (and all of the other circus show gear) was part of a storage locker auction. Basically the owner of the guitar didn't pay the monthly dues. When that happens, the storage facility auctions off the entire contents.

 

aahhh bad times, makes alot of sense now. Good luck this weekend im nervous for you but at the new price you offered if accepted i'd definately buy it.

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Update:

Sometimes when you over-think something, a decision is made for you. The guy said he sold the Bedazz-LP full asking price.

Thanks for all of your input and making a good time of this post!

Got some good peeps here!

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Thats often the way......you were never sure,..couldn't make your mind up,....it was made up for you,...that has happened to me many times with second hand gibsons,.......i'm usually philosophical about it,.....wasn't meant to have it attitude,

if i'm sure,i buy straight away,..

 

I'm sure if you keep looking,a 'project' gibson will come up at a fair price.......good luck.

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