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New- Les Paul Classic Plus/Classic Customs

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I played 2 today. There was a gold top at Guitar Center in Richmond and a black one at Sam Ash next door. The black sounded great but I really didn't like the fret boards. The baked maple felt very hard and dry to me. They were also the lighter color. They are all a mattter of personal preference but I just didn't like the hard, dry feeling on either of those two.

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I played 2 today. There was a gold top at Guitar Center in Richmond and a black one at Sam Ash next door. The black sounded great but I really didn't like the fret boards. The baked maple felt very hard and dry to me. They were also the lighter color. They are all a mattter of personal preference but I just didn't like the hard, dry feeling on either of those two.

 

my rosewood traditional was light and dry when i played it at the store, I conditioned the fret board and it darkened and got alot les dry. I'm wondering if the baked maple will behave the same way.

 

anyone with the new maple boards noticed a change when applying lem oil or any other kind of conditioner?

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my rosewood traditional was light and dry when i played it at the store, I conditioned the fret board and it darkened and got alot les dry. I'm wondering if the baked maple will behave the same way.

 

anyone with the new maple boards noticed a change when applying lem oil or any other kind of conditioner?

 

Yes...mine was pretty dark, anyway, when purchased, but after it's first light application,

of Lemon Oil, it darkened (at least) another shade. What that means, in percentage...not

sure...15-20 percent, or more...maybe? It was noticeable, though, in a good way.

 

CB

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Talked to a friend who owns a music store. Gibson says maple for tuning stability.....or help with it. Not my words or his...gibson rep for ct

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Yes...mine was pretty dark, anyway, when purchased, but after it's first light application,

of Lemon Oil, it darkened (at least) another shade. What that means, in percentage...not

sure...15-20 percent, or more...maybe? It was noticeable, though, in a good way.

 

CB

 

Ok sounds just like the behaviour of rosewood then.

 

thanks CB

 

just waiting for a left handed version to come out of the factory now

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...The baked maple felt very hard and dry to me. They were also the lighter color. They are all a mattter of personal preference but I just didn't like the hard, dry feeling on either of those two.

I had a similar experience as Angellus in that I bought a LP with a rosewood 'board which, when new, felt exactly like the baked maple ones you describe but became 'broken-in' after some conditioning and six months or so of regular playing.

 

The new BM 'boards might do the same. Only time will tell for sure.

 

P.

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Does anyone know if Baked Maple is a trend we will see more of from Gibson? Is there a shortage of Rosewood? 6 months is a long time to condition a fretboard to my taste. I love the maple boards on a lot of Strats, but I haven't yet tried the Baked Maple boards. Any other Gibson guits come with BM fretboard?

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Does anyone know if Baked Maple is a trend we will see more of from Gibson? Is there a shortage of Rosewood? 6 months is a long time to condition a fretboard to my taste. I love the maple boards on a lot of Strats, but I haven't yet tried the Baked Maple boards. Any other Gibson guits come with BM fretboard?

The wood in it's self isn't rare. At least Indian rosewood. India has set up a dumb standard where they want the wood treated locally, and then sent to it's buyer. Gibson wants to buy the wood raw and treat it themselves at their plant. The US government decided to pick Gibson out and make an example of them. It's unknown how long the rosewood shortage will last, sadly. Gibson is making a stand on this issue and I doubt the government will soon over look this silly rule. I don't even think India gives a **** seeing as they are loosing a huge company.

 

I'm wondering how Martin is making out with this. They use Indian rosewood and take great pride in manufacturing their guitars in Nazareth.

 

The baked maple is very similar to rosewood in looks and tone. The wood is heat treated at a very high temperature and is very different from kiln dried maple used by Fender.

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Hello! The specs on Gibson's site says this guitar has a deep-set neck. Does anyone know what does it mean? Long-tenon? As far as I am informed about the construction of LP's, there are 3 different neck joint technics...Thanks for Your answers in advance! Cheers... Bence

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Hello! The specs on Gibson's site says this guitar has a deep-set neck. Does anyone know what does it mean? Long-tenon? As far as I am informed about the construction of LP's, there are 3 different neck joint technics...Thanks for Your answers in advance! Cheers... Bence

 

 

I'm actually interested to know as well. I have rather small hands and though I was considering a Epiphone LP, I really like the New LP Classic much better. And so I'm wondering what the neck's shape difference would mean to someone in my position?

 

LPCST5MMCH1-Glam-Shot.jpg

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Hello! The specs on Gibson's site says this guitar has a deep-set neck. Does anyone know what does it mean? Long-tenon?

More or less.

 

And so I'm wondering what the neck's shape difference would mean to someone in my position?

I'd suggest trying out both of them, but the 60's "slip-taper" neck is usually more accepted by guitarists with small to normal hands. I've got long fingers and still prefer the slip-taper neck, myself.

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More or less.

 

 

I'd suggest trying out both of them, but the 60's "slip-taper" neck is usually more accepted by guitarists with small to normal hands. I've got long fingers and still prefer the slip-taper neck, myself.

 

Thank you that is alot of help.

 

If you don't mind I have one more question..... How similar is the "C shape" neck of the Epiphone Les Paul to the 60's slim neck? This I think is a pretty good feeling neck... I think. But I think I am leaning towards the 60's slim neck with more confidence. Thanks.

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Ok - I am test driving a Classic Custom with the baked maple fretboard right now:

 

Looks - The guitar is a beautiful piece of work. The fretboard on this one looks very much like a darker rosewood. The gold top finish is outstanding.

 

Neck - To me it does not feel like a 60's slim taper. It feels more like a medium 50's neck or a slimmer '59 neck. No complaints though.

 

Frets - They seem quite tall to me and I did not like the feel at first. It seems the more I play it, the better it feels. Perhaps the frets just need to be "broken in".

 

Pickups - Pure sweet tone....the trademark of the '57 classics.

 

Body weight - The guitar weighs 9.4 pounds.

 

Fretboard - It seems hard and dry. Hard to maneuver up and down the fretboard, but again maybe just needs to broken in or slicked up with oil.

 

Guitar case - Made in Canada <_<

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Ok - I am test driving a Classic Custom with the baked maple fretboard right now:

 

Looks - The guitar is a beautiful piece of work. The fretboard on this one looks very much like a darker rosewood. The gold top finish is outstanding.

 

Neck - To me it does not feel like a 60's slim taper. It feels more like a medium 50's neck or a slimmer '59 neck. No complaints though.

 

Frets - They seem quite tall to me and I did not like the feel at first. It seems the more I play it, the better it feels. Perhaps the frets just need to be "broken in".

 

Pickups - Pure sweet tone....the trademark of the '57 classics.

 

Body weight - The guitar weighs 9.4 pounds.

 

Fretboard - It seems hard and dry. Hard to maneuver up and down the fretboard, but again maybe just needs to broken in or slicked up with oil.

 

Guitar case - Made in Canada <_<

 

A good fret dressing will help, a LOT! But, it may (as you said) be just your getting used to them?

Mine are fine, for now. When it (eventually) needs a fret dressing, it will probably be even nicer?

Who knows? I just know that when I finally broke down, and got my "Classic" (Standard) frets done,

it was almost miraculous, the difference. Of course that guitar was never "plek'd," and had squared

off frets, to begin with, which were like "railroad ties" or "speed bumps," when trying to slide up

and down the fingerboard.

 

As to the "dry" board...yeah, mine was too. It vastly improved, when I did a very light coat of Lemon

Oil...also darked it, even more. I think my "Classic Custom" (Gold-Top) was one of the better LP purchases,

that I've made...recent, or otherwise. [thumbup]

 

CB

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I tried a black one at Sam Ash today. At first I was hesitant due to the baked maple. Once I got going that baby cooked! The baked maple was very fast. The neck itself was a little trimmer than my 2001 and 2008 standard pluses. It was very smooth and easy to play. The solid weight and baked maple combo allowed for great tone and sustain. Nice and bright -- but not too bright like my 2008 seems sometimes. Overall I was very pleased. If I could find one that plays and sounds that well in either the gold or natural I might be tempted.[/size][/size]

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Martin and Fender were offered that ebony wood first, they refused Gibson purchased it; strike one.

Gibson had incorrectly filled out paperwork on the indian rosewood; strike two

I love my Gibsons as much as any other here but if your going to do business; you have to stay inside the law. Since all the information we are being fed is from Henry and Co; its very one sided. The only mistake I see that Uncle did was show up with assault weapons. Until the official release of those documents served to Gibson are released all we have is the Tea party version of what happened. I would love to see the real paperwork. Until then this is the closest version of not taking any sides as any reporting I have seen.

 

The Act

Thanks for the insight into the situation.

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Well CB its been a few days now with my new baby. Maybe its still that new guitar feel or just a new guitar sound and I'm loving it and I agree with you. The last few years (since 2005) I have purchased a few guitars (05 LP Studio, Schector Tempest Custom, 08 SG Rawpower, 09 Jem, 08 Iby RG770, 10 PRS, 06 Strat, 07 Iby Prestige) and out of all of them so far this new Classic Custom is the best sounding and feels really nice. Its been since before Katrina since I have owned a Custom, yet I remember the fretboard feeling at nice as this burnt maple fretboard. I really like this guitar; it sounds great and its just easier to play with the smaller neck.

 

I really do believe that Gibson hit a huge Home Run with this guitar..... So much in fact I am considering selling my 05 Studio to grab another Classic Custom.

 

That's great, Guitarest! Glad you're so pleased with it. I'm done, with Les Paul's, for now, anyway.

The next Gibson, will be....well, I'm not quite sure, what it may be, yet. Or, even "when" that might

happen. I'm pretty content, where I am, guitar wise, right now! But, of course, I've said "I'm done,"

before...too many times. LOL So, time will tell, no doubt. [biggrin]

 

CB

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Got a new Classic Plus in Manhattan Midnight with 60's neck profile last week and I love it. The baked maple fretboard is great....I really like the feel of it and believe I will like it even more once the guitar gets a bit more broken in. The Plus is a bit heavier than my 2008 Classic....maybe a half pound heavier. The street price of the 2011 Classic Plus was equal to my 2008 Classic, and my Classic does not have a "plus" flamed top. I'm very happy with the value and quality of the Classic Plus, and from what I have seen of the Classic Custom, it's a great value as well......and yes, I want one of these too! Kudos to Gibson on these more affordable Les Pauls.

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Hello guys! Yesterday, a wine-red and a gold-top Classic Custom arrived to my local shop - unfortunately I have to wait a bit more for my natural... I've tried out the wine-red! I knew it will be heavy, but I was surprised how much it is! The guitar itself was built to perfect quality, and sounded really great through a Marshall Slash head with a 1960 cabinet. The fingerboard is interesting... Dense like ebony, and it's color is nice, but the feel not as warm as on my Studio 50's Tribute (with rosewood board). I think it will take some time to get used to it. The bridge pickup sounded great! Excellent for heavy, thick-sounding riffing or rhythm playing, but I am really curious how it will sound on my vintage amps (usually everything sounds way better on them then on any modern amp out on the market these days). I don't know what gauge strings it was equipped with (I felt like it was 9's), but the guitar definitely needs heavier ones - I think it will improve the feel of the board. I have to say this is a fantastic guitar for this price! Cheers... Bence

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Hello guys! Yesterday, a wine-red and a gold-top Classic Custom arrived to my local shop - unfortunately I have to wait a bit more for my natural... I've tried out the wine-red! I knew it will be heavy, but I was surprised how much it is! The guitar itself was built to perfect quality, and sounded really great through a Marshall Slash head with a 1960 cabinet. The fingerboard is interesting... Dense like ebony, and it's color is nice, but the feel not as warm as on my Studio 50's Tribute (with rosewood board). I think it will take some time to get used to it. The bridge pickup sounded great! Excellent for heavy, thick-sounding riffing or rhythm playing, but I am really curious how it will sound on my vintage amps (usually everything sounds way better on them then on any modern amp out on the market these days). I don't know what gauge strings it was equipped with (I felt like it was 9's), but the guitar definitely needs heavier ones - I think it will improve the feel of the board. I have to say this is a fantastic guitar for this price! Cheers... Bence

I thought all Les Paul's were supplied with 10's. Must be a good neck then.

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Hello guys! Yesterday, a wine-red and a gold-top Classic Custom arrived to my local shop - unfortunately I have to wait a bit more for my natural... I've tried out the wine-red! I knew it will be heavy, but I was surprised how much it is! The guitar itself was built to perfect quality, and sounded really great through a Marshall Slash head with a 1960 cabinet. The fingerboard is interesting... Dense like ebony, and it's color is nice, but the feel not as warm as on my Studio 50's Tribute (with rosewood board). I think it will take some time to get used to it. The bridge pickup sounded great! Excellent for heavy, thick-sounding riffing or rhythm playing, but I am really curious how it will sound on my vintage amps (usually everything sounds way better on them then on any modern amp out on the market these days). I don't know what gauge strings it was equipped with (I felt like it was 9's), but the guitar definitely needs heavier ones - I think it will improve the feel of the board. I have to say this is a fantastic guitar for this price! Cheers... Bence

 

Aside from it's awesome looks, and playbility (I love the darker Baked Maple board, personally),

the thing I love most, about my Gold Top Classic Custom is the pickups! '57's are just "The Bomb!"

They are (for me) THE tone, of a Les Paul! My (Standard) "Classic" came with the hot "Ceramic"

pickups, and while I can see their use, for certain types/styles, of music, they never had "that

Les Paul Tone," for me. Once I swapped them out, for '57 & '57+, I finally got the tone, I remembered,

from my youth, in "The Sixties!" (Early Clapton, Mike Bloomfield, even Dickey Betts!) Those pickups,

through any cranked Type A, or some AB tube amps, is just "Awesome," to me! Again, personal

preferences, but the "Classic Custom" has "that magnificent tone," as well...IMHO!

 

CB

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