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For All The Hippies Out there


JuanCarlosVejar

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Kinda weak as a hippie guitar. This is a hippie guitar......pretty cool for 'round the campfire......

 

hippiegtr.jpg

That's for a somewhat upscale hippie, of course. Remember that Stephen Stills used to get abused by "hippies" for playing a D-45 rather than a D-18. Only a pretty upscale hippie would know the difference.

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You must be thinking of those other kind of Hippies who bought bell bottoms and stuff - not the lower East Side kind who pretty much stuck to the Salvation Army and Army Surplus stores to get by.

 

Any of you other geezers remember when Fender released those paisley and flower Tels and Strats? Definitely a WTF moment. Of course back then we had no ida what those thigs would bring in today's market.

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Guess a broader panel of experts would consider me one of them. Real hippies probably would disagree.

 

But yes I saw this guitar in connection with another thread 'bout the new D-18.

The silhouette logo – sweet but a little silly.

California Dreaming – One of the best songs ever recorded. The track simply has it from the drip-melting acoustic intro to the very last note.

And that flute solo - - - I get down on my knees every time it comes a'flying.

 

Did you know Barry McGuire's ghost can be heard under the first line of the tune. . .

 

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can u explain that one a little more please ?

The M&P band and McGuire was in the same circles business/recordcompany/publishing wise whatever and B.M. recorded the song first with that same backing track (without the winged flute).

When Mamas and Papas took over and started their vocal session, it was a second-hand recording so to speak and in the magic mix it appears they didn't quite get Barry's old lead-vox down. . .

Something like that – others might know more.

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The M&P band and McGuire was in the same circles business/recordcompany/publishing wise whatever and B.M. recorded the song first with that same backing track (without the winged flute).

When Mamas and Papas took over and started their vocal session, it was a second-hand recording so to speak and in the magic mix it appears they didn't quite get Barry's old lead-vox down. . .

Something like that – others might know more.

 

 

You have been listening to "Creeque Alley" again haven't you.

 

Strange though, not only did I just dug out my 45 rpm copy of "Eve of Destruction" to put in the jukebox but when I went to check out an old Wurlitzer electric piano a friend has when he turned it on the first song he played was - yup, you guessed it - "Eve of Destruction."

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You have been listening to "Creeque Alley" again haven't you.

 

Strange though, not only did I just dug out my 45 rpm copy of "Eve of Destruction" to put in the jukebox but when I went to check out an old Wurlitzer electric piano a friend has when he turned it on the first song he played was - yup, you guessed it - "Eve of Destruction."

Creeque Alley I've never heard of (is it a radio program), but I know my beat-classics.

 

Eve of Destruction and Würlitzer, , , count me in 3-4. . . .

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Creeque Alley I've never heard of (is it a radio program), but I know my beat-classics.

 

Eve of Destruction and Würlitzer, , , count me in 3-4. . . .

 

Haha think I shot myself in the foot there. Creeque Alley is a 1967 hit single I see. . .

Better have a listen.

 

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Guess a broader panel of experts would consider me one of them. Real hippies probably would disagree.

 

 

By 1968 being a Hippie was more a fashion statement than anything else.

 

I can't figure out if I was a hippie or not (I actually preferred the label freak). I had hair down to my waist and wore Levis that were pretty much held together by patches. Lots of T-shirts but no tie dye. I had a solid, although not flashy, arrest record. I spent alot of time under the hoods of old VWs (and was thankful for Muir's Idiot's Guide) and Volvos to keep them running.

 

On the other hand I loved showers. I preferred living alone to communes and never went in search of a lifestyle. My biggest fault, however, was probably that I just could not get into the Grateful Dead - although I did love the Airplane.

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It's a nice looking guitar (with the exception of the headstock inlay which I personally don't like) but to me it seems like another marketing ploy. I like the tortoise guard and would prefer that on my D28. But is there anything really unique about this guitar other than a couple of signatures (or photographs of signatures) and a weird little headstock inlay?

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You have been listening to "Creeque Alley" again haven't you.

 

Strange though, not only did I just dug out my 45 rpm copy of "Eve of Destruction" to put in the jukebox but when I went to check out an old Wurlitzer electric piano a friend has when he turned it on the first song he played was - yup, you guessed it - "Eve of Destruction."

 

 

And, of course, Barry McGuire--like an unbelievable number of people, including an old friend of mine--spent time as part of the New Christy Minstrels. Now that's an alumni list worth looking at!!

 

What goes around, comes around in this business.

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By 1968 being a Hippie was more a fashion statement than anything else.

 

I can't figure out if I was a hippie or not (I actually preferred the label freak). I had hair down to my waist and wore Levis that were pretty much held together by patches. Lots of T-shirts but no tie dye. I had a solid, although not flashy, arrest record. I spent alot of time under the hoods of old VWs (and was thankful for Muir's Idiot's Guide) and Volvos to keep them running.

 

On the other hand I loved showers. I preferred living alone to communes and never went in search of a lifestyle. My biggest fault, however, was probably that I just could not get into the Grateful Dead - although I did love the Airplane.

 

ZW, I feel like I'm looking in the mirror here, listening to you talk..........

 

I once rebuilt the engine of a VW camper on the foor of my living room using Muir's guide. But that was long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away......

 

But I do still drive a Volvo.....

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And, of course, Barry McGuire--like an unbelievable number of people, including an old friend of mine--spent time as part of the New Christy Minstrels. Now that's an alumni list worth looking at!!

 

What goes around, comes around in this business.

 

 

My favorite member remains the much missed Gene Clark.

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By 1968 being a Hippie was more a fashion statement than anything else.

 

I can't figure out if I was a hippie or not (I actually preferred the label freak). I had hair down to my waist and wore Levis that were pretty much held together by patches. Lots of T-shirts but no tie dye. I had a solid, although not flashy, arrest record. I spent alot of time under the hoods of old VWs (and was thankful for Muir's Idiot's Guide) and Volvos to keep them running.

 

On the other hand I loved showers. I preferred living alone to communes and never went in search of a lifestyle. My biggest fault, however, was probably that I just could not get into the Grateful Dead - although I did love the Airplane.

Here it was pretty serious – it was a concrete counter-cultural movement, which around '67-68-69 had 2 names. Either you could call yourself hippie or 'provo' (provocateur). The latter were more politically orientated, but all in all they wore the same cape. Then again there were many social layers – from DeLuxe hippies who primarily hovered in some romantic sphere, over intellectuals to down right freaks. Read an interesting article about this some time ago. The author - a working-class hippie - remembered a big difference that most people here seem to overlook or forget :

 

The upper-class hippies tended to shy away from all the possibilities the new mentality opened in society, where as the working-class hippies embraced them as if a stream from Shangri La came their way. The first already 'blessed' with material wealth and opportunities, wanted something completely else – the latter suddenly got access to what they could only dream of before. Still they met under the same roofs, same parties, same ball-halls, in front of the same rock bands.

 

I would like to see a picture of '68-zomb. I know you – among other brave members here - was in zenith back then. Wasn't it you who saw several very early Joni M. shows.

I might be wrong, but whoever attended those events witnessed something huuuuge being born. . . .

 

Now what has it to do with Gibsons – ooouhh a lot of them were involved. . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ZW, I feel like I'm looking in the mirror here, listening to you talk..........

 

I once rebuilt the engine of a VW camper on the foor of my living room using Muir's guide. But that was long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away......

 

But I do still drive a Volvo.....

 

Always good to know that we are still out there.

 

Lordy, I loved those Volvo 544s although the 122s were alot easier to find. I was still driving a VW bus up to a few years ago. And I was still using Muir's guide (although a newer edition). One of the few photos I have of myself was taken in the early 2000s with me standing in front of that bus in Ferriday, Louisiana (we were on our way to visit the home of Jerry Leee Lewis). My wife, however, got to the point where she would not even get into it. I could not bring myself to sell it so gave it to a good friend.

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I never saw Joni Mitchell, but was lucky to see Gene Clark and The Firebirds in New York 1984. On drums - Michael Clarke.

The 2 original members now gone, lords protect their souls. . .

 

I am lucky enough to have seen Gene with the Byrds (it was my first concert). I first saw Joni at Carnegie Hall in early 1969.

 

If you ever get a chance snag some of the recordings Gene made with Carla Olson (one time singer with the Textones). Amazing stuff.

 

One of my favorites

 

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