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Shagnasty

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Help!

 

I have an SG custom that I have been playing since 1976 or 77. 3 humbuckers and just a sweet, muddy sound. Very curious to know when the guitar was made. Pressed into the headstock is the serial number 400283. Any ideas? I tried posting a pic, but it is too big.

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Get an account on a picture hosting, they're free, like Photobucket - http://wwww.photobucket.com/ - Upload your photos there. Copy the "Direct link" from Photobucket into the "Insert image" tool on the Post editor's toolbar here on the forum. Here's directions - http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/11005-sticky-how-to-post-photos/

 

The serial - Did you buy it new in 76/77? A serial in the 400000s should indicate 74-75 (hard to tell for sure with Gibson's numbers) - http://www.gibson.com/Files/downloads/bluebook/GibsonSERIALNUMBERS.pdf

 

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Get an account on a picture hosting, they're free, like Photobucket - http://wwww.photobucket.com/ - Upload your photos there. Copy the "Direct link" from Photobucket into the "Insert image" tool on the Post editor's toolbar here on the forum. Here's directions - http://forum.gibson....to-post-photos/

 

The serial - Did you buy it new in 76/77? A serial in the 400000s should indicate 74-75 (hard to tell for sure with Gibson's numbers) - http://www.gibson.co...RIALNUMBERS.pdf

 

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When I bought it, there was already finish cracks and the "white" was the same color as dad toenails...so there was a bit of age. It still plays like a dream...even if it is ugly :) I will try the photobucket thing and see if I can't get a picture up here.

 

Kalamazoo! 1966? Yikes... If that turns out to be the date, I am gonna put my SG in a safe deposit box.

 

Thanks for the reponses!

 

 

Shag

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That's a beautiful Custom and it looks well cared for. Congrats.

 

Is that the original bridge? Looks like a 70s bridge.

 

If you bought it used, then as Paul commented the serial number range also appears in the 1960s - according to Gibson from 1966 - 1968 - http://www.gibson.com/Files/downloads/bluebook/GibsonSERIALNUMBERS.pdf

 

Here's your pics -

 

100_4742.jpg

 

100_4737.jpg

 

100_4743.jpg

 

100_4739.jpg

 

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I have to admit that I did change the machine heads. I got tired of cranking/cranking/cranking to change strings, so I built an attachment that fit nicely on the end of a hand drill. Not being much of an engineer, I failed to realize that the torque and RPM's a drill creates would overwhelm the original machine heads. (D'Oh!) Other than that, everything is as it was when I bought it. If the bridge is not correct that could be another clue as to the age? There is a lot of conflicting information out there...prolly because of the less than organized Gibson serial number system.

 

Anyhow, my quest began when I took the guitar in to get some idea of how much it would cost to refinish it. The yellowing and finish cracks really were bugging me. One place gave me a quote, but the owner of the second place I took it to told me if I refinished the guitar he would choke me...He thought it was a classic and a refinish would ruin it. He told me the guitar's finish was cracked because of some bizarre manufacturing error and that made it valuable...HAH! I don't know what flawed logic led him to that conclusion...I would guess that a manufacturing error would DEVALUE an instrument. Who knows...

 

I just love the guitar and it has served me well over the decades. It's ugly, but sweet. Kinda like a worn out girlfriend...

 

Thanks again for the input and the help with photobucket!

 

 

 

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That's a beautiful Custom and it looks well cared for. Congrats.

 

Is that the original bridge? Looks like a 70s bridge.

 

If you bought it used, then as Paul commented the serial number range also appears in the 1960s - according to Gibson from 1966 - 1968 - http://www.gibson.co...RIALNUMBERS.pdf

 

Here's your pics -

 

100_4742.jpg

 

100_4737.jpg

 

100_4743.jpg

 

100_4739.jpg

 

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I have to admit that I did change the machine heads. .....

 

.... the second place I took it to told me if I refinished the guitar he would choke me...He thought it was a classic and a refinish would ruin it. He told me the guitar's finish was cracked because of some bizarre manufacturing error and that made it valuable.....

 

I didn't miss the Grover Imperials. A machine change is to be expected on a player.

 

You got good advice on not refinishing the guitar - the more original the condition, the higher the value. But there's no manufacturing defect - what you see is a quirk of the nitrocellulose lacquer Gibson uses to finish their guitars. It's thin and prone to crack when the wood shrinks and swells in response to changes in humidity and temperature. Completely normal for an old Gibson to show the cracking/crazing lines.

 

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Gibson duplicated serial numbers a lot in the '70's, so you can't go by the serial number alone to date those. I'm sure your serial number was used on a '66 Gibson of some kind, more than likely not an SG Custom; maybe not even an SG. You've got to go by the features to date those things at all. Your Custom is definitely a '70's model. A '66 would have had the neck pickup 3/4" or so away from the end of the fretboard, and the pickups squeezed together so there was no space between the mounting rings, unless it was a late-'66, in which case it would have the pickups mounted into a large pickguard without mounting rings, but they'd be in the same place as on the earlier version. I'm not sure when they changed to the big pickguard, only that it was sometime in '66. All the features on yours point to the mid-'70's.

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