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trapdoorspider

Best glue for a headstock repair?

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I have a 1976 Gibson S-1 with a five-piece headstock, and it's split apart at one of the seams.

 

What is the best kind of glue for this kind of repair? It needs to be very thin so the pieces will mesh back together tightly without a gap, but it also needs to be very strong since the low-E string tuner (and bushing) run right through the seam.

 

I know Titebond is good stuff, but it's fairly thick, isn't it?

 

Would regular Superglue work just as well?

 

Thanks,

Michael

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Do NOT use superglue. It breaks down over time, and will only contaminate the wood, making a proper repair harder.

 

You might consider taking it to a professional, someone who can do the repair right. At least get an estimate.

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I have a cracked headstock, and I am looking into using Hide Glue... I've heard great things about it.. Sands good, etc. Preparation is key. The page i read says to make sure its the right strength, and to use clamps.

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Try visiting Stewart McDonald's website. They offer the proper tools and glues for repairing instruments. They also have some great repair guides available. You can check them out at www.stewmac.com

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I have a cracked headstock, and I am looking into using Hide Glue... I've heard great things about it..

 

I use Hide Glue for all guitar (wood) repairs. Sitting on my workbench right now is a bottle of "Titebond Liquid Hide Glue". Cost a few bucks at Home Depot. Great stuff.

 

That reminds me, I have a Precision Bass body in the shop somewhere I need to glue back together.

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I use Hide Glue for all guitar (wood) repairs. Sitting on my workbench right now is a bottle of "Titebond Liquid Hide Glue". Cost a few bucks at Home Depot. Great stuff.

 

That reminds me, I have a Precision Bass body in the shop somewhere I need to glue back together.

Just went to the Depot to buy that particular glue, and I could not find it. Neither could the man and woman working in that department. Which section did you get yours at? What other stores could I check at?

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Just went to the Depot to buy that particular glue, and I could not find it. Neither could the man and woman working in that department. Which section did you get yours at? What other stores could I check at?

 

It was in the paint department at my store, the aisle (and side of that aisle) with the caulking and construction adhesives type products. Home Depot changes what they stock on a (too) regular basis. Maybe they don't carry it anymore. Check the Titebond website for "retailers in your area", or call around to other stores.

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Titebond is the simple man's hide glue & much easier to use for this kind of repair. Hide glue is much more involved (and for many also difficult- you'll see why in a minute).

 

Real hide glue comes in a powered form that must be mixed with a specific amount of water (the amount of which gets mixed with the powder is based on weight, not volume). In other words you need a scale or balance to get equal weights of water & powdered glue that then get mixed together. Once you get the correct mixture the glue must be heated to 140 degree F. It takes something called a hide glue pot (that you can buy) to heat, or a double boiler that you can make & use on your stove (to make one you'll need two pots; one which must fit inside the other with room for water that will heat the smaller pot's mixture). You'll also need a candy thermometer to stick into the smaller container (pot) to check the temperature & get it up to 140.

 

I'll try to find the link I used to learn about making & using hot hide glue. FWIW it is what I used on a neck/headstock repair on my '76 Explorer. Stay tuned for link.

 

Sharky

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The really nice thing about hide glue is that it cleans up completely with water (like when it oozes out when you clamp your repair) & you can easily steam apart any repairs later (like neck resets). It also creates a bond that is actually stronger than the wood itself. Can't say that all the other types of glues.

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Bottled "hide" glue like Titebond also has a shelf life, and if it is, or gets, too old (how old is too old I don't know right off hand) it will not bind as well as it should. Just something to keep in mind. Powdered hide glue, on the other hand, does not have a shelf life, so you can keep the powder around for as long as you like without any worries about it holding together.

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