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1965 J 50


Eldogdaddy

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I just bought this for myself on my birthday. Spent all my birthday money, $30. Hope I didn't get ripped off.

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with the crusty 20 year old strings, it sounded and played fantastic.

I cleaned it up a little and put new strings on it... Can't put it down.

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taking it to Ben Chafin, having the pickguard replaced, and get her buffed up.

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Now THATS how to buy a guitar. Good playing to you - by the way, mind telling just how you came onto this? Cleaning out an attic? Go on Ebay & sell it for $2500 [rolleyes]

 

My wife's sister and boyfriend were by a few weeks ago visiting my wife. I was in my office playing a guitar, and she came in and started to talk about a girl that she knows at work... all I could think of was "Her A/C doesn't work", well... she wanted to sell her fathers old guitar and violin. She asked if I would be interested in the guitar, and how much. It caught me by surprise, I said that I would have to see it first, maybe she could email a picture of it.

Thursday evening, they showed up again, this time had the guitar wrapped in a bed sheet. I took a look, it was a little out of tune, and the strings were extremely old and crusty, but it rang out like it was amplified. I asked what she wanted for it, she said $50, but she will probably only want $20. Do you want it? I grabbed my wallet, I had $5 left from a $20 my stepson gave me, the change from buying some new strings. My neighbor gave me a card with $25. cash. There it was, all of my birthday money in my wallet, $30. I said that this is all I have, will she take it? Yes, and she offered to bring me the change if she took the $20. I declined.

Her boyfriend said he loves stuff like this, he watches those reality shows that find stuff in storages and closets. He thinks I can probably get $100 for this baby.

 

It is my intention, especially after cleaning her up and restringing her, to keep, and play and enjoy. I've researched it just after getting it. I'm happy.

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Hoss, I ain't sure whether you stumbled into the deal of the year or just took advantage of somebody.

 

I apologize as I don't know you and it really ain't none of my business but the whole story for whatever reason just bothers me.

 

Hmmm,

 

me too a little.... I don't know if I could of taken it off her at that price..... I would have probably said it was worth more and offered her a price that I was happy with ..in my conscience .. thats just me though. every time I have acquired things in a dubious manner.. things always go wrong with em [tongue]

 

Good luck to ya tho [thumbup]

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Well, I wouldn't beat up the OP too much. Heck he used all his b'day money! You'll see very good condition and some bad J50ADJ from that era on ebay for which they ask $2500 but they ain't gettin' that. That one looks pretty beat up, has no case, and is not collectable at this point. Truth be known, the several I've seen in person needed more work than they were worth and usually a neck reset. Easy to get upside down on them. Those ADJ saddles suck the tone out of them under the best circumstances My guess is that it will end up being an interesting player and never anything more.

 

On the other hand, if you find an excellent 1950s J50, call me!

 

30 bucks is a steal and the OP can still make ammends if he feels any guilty pains. None of us actually know what we would do if confronted with the possiblity of loosing a sweet deal.

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That's gotta be the bargain of the century. Why can't I find Gibson guitars for $30 - booo hooo.

 

Gee, Paul. I paid $50 for my '48 J-45 in 1966. But the cardboard case cost an extra $10 or so. And half the braces were flopping around on the inside of the guitar.

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I understand the feelings. I've been a Gibson man since I heard Jeff Beck's Blow by Blow. Peter Frampton's '54 Black Beauty, you have the same attraction and stories.

Here's another story. When I was starting 7th Grade, Lealman Junior High here in St. Petersburg, Florida I got into "Band" The band director asked what I played. I said that I wanted to play guitar, he laughed and said that he had an instrument for me. While he was gone, I looked at the rest of the band sitting there waiting. I saw a guy with a trombone and said to myself, sure hope he doesn't bring one of those out for me... and that is exactly what he brought for my first instrument, a dang

old trombone. I got past that during the rest of the day, then excited about being in music. Walking home with my trombone that day was exciting, but not as exciting as what I came across in the alley at my neighbors home. There by the garbage cans was a brown alligator skin guitar case with a Gibson logo on a brass plate near the handle and a name tag "Clara Pigg". I opened it up to find a mint condition Gibson L1 Acoustic guitar, strap, two sets of strings, and an assortment of picks and a chrome capo (I still have the capo).

I showed both to my mom when she got home from work. She said that the trombone has to go, and I need to find a more quiet instrument... then asked about the guitar. She said that was a mistake, go next door and ask Ms. Pigg if she meant to leave that out like that, so I did. I met Ms. Pigg at Mr. Bird's house, I know sounds funny but how else would I remember this 42 years later? Ms. Pigg was Mr. Birds nurse and caretaker, she said that she moved here, found her guitar in storage and said it

would break her heart to look at that guitar, what she spent and never learned to play, and if it was covered with green mold she couldn't live with that memory, but for me to keep and enjoy.

It was my first guitar. I couldn't play a D chord. I had it until I was 16. I was looking for a used car at a lot on 4th street in St. Pete. I found the car but not the money. The salesman at this used car lot had two very young children, his wife stopped by while we were talking. Long story short, he could play, I couldn't. I couldn't afford the car, he couldn't afford a guitar, It broke my heart, I went home, got that gibby and gave it to him. I said that he would enjoy more than me, have a wonderful life with it. He played it and started crying, his wife started crying. I had to leave.

 

I've given away lots of my guitars to people that couldn't afford a guitar but had that spark and passion in their eye since then.

I've had my 1979 Gibson Les Paul Custom, (Randy Rhoads exact guitar, different year) STOLEN from me while I was in the service, stationed in Germany.

my 1978 Cherry Sunburst Deluxe, sold for $250 to go to my brother's wedding and eventually met my first wife.

When things were good, I got a bonus from work in 2004, I replaced my missing gibby with a freaking awesome 2003 LP Standard light burst (1959/Warren Haynes)

and will never, well I'll have it to my death.

 

With this deal, I see it as my KARMA coming around for all the guitars that I've given away, not for profiting but for the love of sharing music. I want her father to look down and see his guitar getting love, and plenty of vibration time, not used as a way for me to get over on anyone or try to make a profit whatsoever. I plan on keeping and playing this treasure. I apologize if I've made any of you uncomfortable or to feel the way you do. Your Karma will come too.

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I've given away lots of my guitars to people that couldn't afford a guitar but had that spark and passion in their eye since then.

 

In the words of my elders that is called performing a mitzvah. A few weeks ago I gave a 1972 Guild D-25 I had brought back from the dead to a friend who was playing in a Worship Band but not owning a guitar was borrowing one. Just a good feeling to help somebody get the music they have in them out.

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With this deal, I see it as my KARMA coming around for all the guitars that I've given away, not for profiting but for the love of sharing music. I want her father to look down and see his guitar getting love, and plenty of vibration time, not used as a way for me to get over on anyone or try to make a profit whatsoever. I plan on keeping and playing this treasure. I apologize if I've made any of you uncomfortable or to feel the way you do. Your Karma will come too.

 

 

Well said sir! Thanks for sharing your stories.

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None of us actually know what we would do if confronted with the possiblity of loosing a sweet deal.

 

Not so! I have been in a similar situation a few times and I know exactly what I would do.

 

Suffice to say that I've never scored a vintage guitar for chump change.

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None of us actually know what we would do if confronted with the possiblity of loosing a sweet deal.

 

A not true from me as well. I have been in the situation of being able to snag an old guitar worth serious bucks from somebody who did not have a clue what the thing was worth for next to nothing a few times - the last time it was a 1940s Martin 00-28.

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A not true from me as well. Not saying I am a saint or anything but a few years back I got a call from somebody who wanted me to have a look at his grandmother's guitar which had been sitting in a closet for years and which she wanted to sell to pay for some repairs on her house. It was a Martin which she did know was a good guitar and she kinda sheepishly asked me if $500 would be too much. It was filthy and needed a neck reset but yeah, it was a Martin - a 1940s 00-28 to be exact.

 

I gotta admit the devil on one shoulder whispered in my ear take it. But then my pain in the butt conscience took over. To make a long story short I hooked her up with somebody who gave her a fair price for the guitar. Hey I lost a great deal but did get a wonderful homemade apple pie.

 

A lot of us have similar stories. When I was in the music business back in the early 70's, we were on tour in the Midwest. We went to an elderly lady's house for tea (can't remember why) and I found a small, broken guitar behind my chair (headstock was off). She said she had forgotten to put it out in the trash. I peeked inside, and it was stamped "C.F. Martin NY". I had that moment where I said "I could walk out of here with this", but instead, I told her she had an old and potentially valuable guitar. To make a long story short, I hand-delivered it to Martin in Nazareth, and they sent it back saying it was beyond repair.

 

I found a good luthier who specialiszed in 19th century Martins, had it beautifully restored, and sold it for her to a lady from NY who drove up to my house in RI to pick it up. The elderly lady paid for the restoration. Incidentally, that was the first time I came in contact with the original Martin "bird's beak" neck/headstock joint, which is one of the most beautiful and strong joints in existence. The glue had simply failed on this one over 100 years, and it went back together perfectly. Now, they carve the neck to look like this joint, but it's only a one-piece neck designed to look like that original, complex joint.

 

In any case, I hope I generated some good karma from that one.

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A not true from me as well. I have been in the situation of being able to snag an old guitar worth serious bucks from somebody who did not have a clue what the thing was worth for next to nothing a few times - the last time it was a 1940s Martin 00-28.

 

It is good to be tested on ethical issues. You and J45 Nick have been and selected a path that:

 

1. showed respect for the person who owned the instruments yet didn't know what they had

2. honored the ideal of fair play and honesty

3. produced consequences favorable to at least some of those involved

 

Good job to both of you.!!!

 

However, my original statement which was something like "until faced with a situation, we don't know what we will do", is still valid I think. First everyone will not be tested in this way. I am NOT a moral relativitist, but believe that ethics is a complicated business. I can not be an absolutist and say what the OP did was absolutely wrong. I still contend that the relatively low worth of the instrument (it ain't no 19 century Martin, it's a non-collectable mid 60s Gibson) , the desire of both parties to gain money-wise, and the lack of time to make a studied decision are mitigating circumstances.

 

So the OP made the argument that he, in the past, banked the karma for this incident (someone else raised the karma issue). One can buy that depending on the level of one's point of view on the spiritial.

 

1. Perhaps he honored the concept of fair play in the market place, but not honesty if it's fullest.

 

2. Reparation is also an ideal that can be applied and the OP can make reparations if, after careful consideration he feels he should. The final recondition of the J50ADJ may determine if that is necessary. I still contend that to love this guitar may require spending some bucks.

 

3. The monitary consequences may favor both parties. The seller may be telling the neighbor "man am I glad to unload that old POS guitar that's been in my way. Fool didn't know it was broken and needed a neck reset. I took my girl out for a movie and burger on that money" and the night ended well.

 

4. I'm not sure that respect for persons was honored but perhaps it was ... not enough info.

 

 

YOUR THOUGHTS?

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True that every sales agreement is, in fact, a disagreement between two parties regarding the relative worth of goods versus money. However, I think that that "agreeable disagreement" assumes equitable knowledge. If, however, one party is knowingly leveraging the others ignorance I think it becomes less... innocent.

 

"I think this guitar is worth $x,xxx on eBay, but I'll give you $xx for it today" is different from hastily scrapping for pennies before the seller... moves on... wises up?

 

That's how I see it anyway.

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YOUR THOUGHTS?

 

I'm not judging the OP in any way. I don't believe you are under any particular obligation in situations such as this, unless you are consciously taking advantage of someone who is in dire straits. We all make these calls at the time the event occurs.

 

All of us are looking for a deal, one way or another. Look a retrorod's estate sale SJ. He was at the right place at the right time, and got a great deal. No harm done.

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