Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
ics1974

new SG's still have PCB's

Recommended Posts

Of course they are. Almost every "standard" production guitar they make has the PCB board. It speeds up production by making the electronics a simple, drop in unit. There's nothing wrong with it, as long as you like the pickups that came in the guitar. Even then, you can buy special plugs to allow you to simply unplug the old pups, and plug in the new ones. It only becomes a hassle if you have a pot go bad or something. I have 2 Gibbys with the PCB and they are fine guitars. The other 2 have the traditional point to point wiring. This is inevitable, progress, call it what you will......anything to speed production and lower production costs! (Make more, faster, for less) LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, but are they proper PCB's as we know them? Or do they simply have volume and tone pots and capacitors mounted on a board for ease of assembly?

 

If so, one wonders why they didn't think of doing it years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The PCB in my LP Studio and SG Special seem to be good stuff. Only time will tell though. The pots still have the Gibson logos, and seem to be about the same pots used as before the PCB. I suppose if a fella were good with a soldering iron, changing parts on the PCB wouldn't be so hard at all...... [huh]

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no PCB (printed circuit board) inside a Gibson guitar. It's simply an alloy plate with the pots and capacitors on it. Built as a unit for ease of production.

 

See here for a Les Paul example. If you can see any printed circuits, let me know.

 

003-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gibsons are already mass produced. I've only seen the PCB in the lower end guitars but it might be in some other. It's just a way to keep costs down. If they were smart they would offer different plug and play boards with options such as coil spliting and phasing and such as after market hot rod options. I might do that myself now that I think of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never seen that before either. I imagine that there's no real componentry apart from the usual pots and caps (correct me if I'm wrong, someone), they just seem to be using a piece of board to mount it all on, and using plugs instead of soldering some connections. No reason why they shouldn't, it's probably what any mass producer would do, and frankly it's surprising why they didn't do it years ago.

 

As for coil-tapping or hot-rodding Searcy, I can't see how a board necessarily makes that any easier to do, it was always an option for anyone with a soldering iron, the right components, and some wire. Go for it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when did this start? my SG special faded certainly doesn't have anything like that...

 

The one pictured above is in a 2008 SG Special Faded. That's the first year I know of that they started using these types of boards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine that there's no real componentry apart from the usual pots and caps (correct me if I'm wrong, someone), they just seem to be using a piece of board to mount it all on, and using plugs instead of soldering some connections.

 

The boards are being used they typical way PCBs are used. The componentry is what you would expect to find in an SG or Les Paul style guitar.

 

As for coil-tapping or hot-rodding Searcy, I can't see how a board necessarily makes that any easier to do, it was always an option for anyone with a soldering iron, the right components, and some wire.

 

It would make it easier in the sence that you would not have to know how to solder or what the right components are or how to put them together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Searcy, you still need to solder components to a PCB! The pathways are etched, that's all, check out the Les Paul photo. But if you wanted to simply change a pot or cap, then I would agree that theoretically it could be easier, but you'd need to de-solder the original from the board first, they don't just plug in.

 

Jim, there's no reason why you shouldn't do that, either using the PCB board, or reverting back to the old tried and trusted method we all know and love so well. The introduction of a PCB to mount the kit on doesn't improve the sound, it's just a manufacturing shortcut. It cuts out the need to employ someone to solder all the electric guts together once they're in the guitar. The ground wire from the bridge, the pickup wires, and the output jack are all fitted with plugs, which simply plug in to the board. It must cut guitar production time down significantly.

 

gibson2008-les-paul-standardcontrolcavity.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Searcy, you still need to solder components to a PCB! The pathways are etched, that's all, check out the Les Paul photo. But if you wanted to simply change a pot or cap, then I would agree that theoretically it could be easier, but you'd need to de-solder the original from the board first, they don't just plug in.

 

 

What? [blink] I never suggested that Gibson or others makers offer up after market PCBs with no components attached to them. What would be the point of that? When you buy a new mother borad you don't have to solder all the components to it do you?

 

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.

 

It's a cheep and easy way for Gibson to offer their customers more flexibility in shaping their own tone without having to pay a guy like me to rewire their guitars just to see what it might sound like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.

 

That's kind of what Taylor does with its electrics. The pickups are a plug connection so you can buy multiple pickguard/pickup assemblies. Just unplug one and plug another in and you have a different pickup configuration.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What? [blink] I never suggested that Gibson or others makers offer up after market PCBs with no components attached to them. What would be the point of that? When you buy a new mother borad you don't have to solder all the components to it do you?

 

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.

 

It's a cheep and easy way for Gibson to offer their customers more flexibility in shaping their own tone without having to pay a guy like me to rewire their guitars just to see what it might sound like.

 

 

Ah, NOW I see where you were going with that! [thumbup]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 2011 SG with the PCB and the bridge pickup sounded weak. As I always replace pickups no problem. I installed my David Allen Powerage pups and the neck was incredible but the bride sounded weak which is not typical. So re-adjust pups hight all the norm settings still huge difference in tone. My tech recommended just traditional wireing and to pull the pcb. which I did and whoah what a difference. Might be faster for Gibson but making good stuff isn't about speed its quality. Im no fan [thumbdn] of the newer way Gibson is doing their factory installs, I would bet if anybody did the same they also would notice better tone. Some things in my opinion don't need upgrade I do like the plug in idea which you don't need a pcb to do so.Heres a suggestion how about lower prices and better quality?? [thumbup]=D>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the caps and pot values are all the same, there is no sonic difference between a guitar with a PCB and a guitar with wire in it. Quality wise, you are more likely to get consistant results from a mass produced PCB than you are from 20 hourly laborers slapping parts into widgets on a line all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no PCB (printed circuit board) inside a Gibson guitar. It's simply an alloy plate with the pots and capacitors on it. Built as a unit for ease of production.

 

See here for a Les Paul example. If you can see any printed circuits, let me know.

 

003-1.jpg

 

My 2016 Gibson SG's is definitely a thick well made circuit board with nice wide copper traces. The board seems to be .090" thick which is very sturdy.

I think they are great as long as you stick to the stock pickups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The PCB in my LP Studio and SG Special seem to be good stuff. Only time will tell though. The pots still have the Gibson logos, and seem to be about the same pots used as before the PCB. I suppose if a fella were good with a soldering iron, changing parts on the PCB wouldn't be so hard at all...... [huh]

Correct

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Farnsbarns

This is an ancient thread which has been resurrected, in case anyone didn't notice.

 

The thing with PCBs in audio circuits is the unwanted capacitance between the board and the track. That said, if you can't hear it, it's not a problem, but in audio circles aluminium boards with a very thin coating to insulate are used to combat the problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are several gibby's with dip switches in them to change the wiring config for phasing/splitting/tapping etc. as long as you have 4 wire pick ups with the correct plug on the nd of the leads, you could swap in one of those boards in minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...