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Going Wireless


Rocky4

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Anybody use a wireless set up? I see Nady makes a couple of inexpensive models. Would they be ok for just messing around in the house? And whats with all the different channels?

I've been using this for the past year or so. Got tired of tripping over wires.

 

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/line-6-relay-g30-digital-wireless-guitar-system

 

I'm strictly home use, although my Sweetwater rep said his whole band uses them. The only downside is that your batteries don't faaaaaaade away...they DIE!

 

I'm happy with it.

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IMO, if you dont need to use a wireless system, then dont.... It hurts the signal.

 

I recall back when I used them they did do that and cross signals, squelch and pick up noise, so I went back to cable leads, but these new digital systems claim to not effect the tone, like the Line 6 stuff. The demos I've heard were promising.

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I use Audio Technica wireless every show i play,love the freedom of not having to stay on stage,ive seen some pretty low budget ones at MF,if you got the $ to try one,id say try it,its fun to be able to walk out in my driveway and hear it roaring in my studio through the window,the best part imo is going out to the soundboard during soundcheck or during the gig and hearing what kinda job your soundman is doing for you,its a luxury to hear the finished product of your band live thru the P.A. vs.videotaping it. [thumbup]

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Guest farnsbarns

I've always wondered about this, I often turn down the volume on my guitar to clean it up slightly and all that stuff. Now, after the transmitter has sent the signal, how does the receiver know where my volume pot is. I mean if it's been turned into radio waves how does signal level arrive at the receiver. Since the guitar volume effects a lot more the just volume, I just don't get it.

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I've always wondered about this, I often turn down the volume on my guitar to clean it up slightly and all that stuff. Now, after the transmitter has sent the signal, how does the receiver know where my volume pot is. I mean if it's been turned into radio waves how does signal level arrive at the receiver. Since the guitar volume effects a lot more the just volume, I just don't get it.

IMO the signal being sent only replaces the chord <up to the guitar jack> from that point it works the same,if you unplug the guitar and touch the 1/4" male end,it will hum just like if you had a chord,at THAT point you have no volume control,but when u complete the signal ie. plug it into something with volume pot,it gives you full control of the volume/tone pots.If the amp head is point A and the female jack on the guitar is point B,that's all the wireless is replacing,you still have the normal chords to and from any effects you use.Hope that helps.

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Guest farnsbarns

IMO the signal being sent only replaces the chord <up to the guitar jack> from that point it works the same,if you unplug the guitar and touch the 1/4" male end,it will hum just like if you had a chord,at THAT point you have no volume control,but when u complete the signal ie. plug it into something with volume pot,it gives you full control of the volume/tone pots.If the amp head is point A and the female jack on the guitar is point B,that's all the wireless is replacing,you still have the normal chords to and from any effects you use.Hope that helps.

 

Well, I'd have to try one to be sure but radio waves cannot carry anywhere near the same current as wires. If the could we wouldn't need wired mains connections do to my thinking the signal being sent by radio is tiny and is amplified again by the receiver to guitar output levels again so in theory (to my mind) the ability to adjust the gain at the guitar volume pot should be lost. I suppose I must be wrong but I am one of those types, I don't like not understanding something which can be understood.

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Well, I'd have to try one to be sure but radio waves cannot carry anywhere near the same current as wires. If the could we wouldn't need wired mains connections do to my thinking the signal being sent by radio is tiny and is amplified again by the receiver to guitar output levels again so in theory (to my mind) the ability to adjust the gain at the guitar volume pot should be lost. I suppose I must be wrong but I am one of those types, I don't like not understanding something which can be understood.

 

 

Imagine it this way You're listenting to a live radio broadcast of a guitaist by plugging a radio tuner into you amp. If the person playing the guitar at the station turns the volume pot on the guitar down , the modulation level of the wireless signal leaving the station drops , and the output of your tuner into the amplifier drops correspondingly . Therefore, the volume knob of the guitar is effectively controlling the level of the input to your amplifier, even though they may be miles apart.

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Guest farnsbarns

Imagine it this way You're listenting to a live radio broadcast of a guitaist by plugging a radio tuner into you amp. If the person playing the guitar at the station turns the volume pot on the guitar down , the modulation level of the wireless signal leaving the station drops , and the output of your tuner into the amplifier drops correspondingly . Therefore, the volume knob of the guitar is effectively controlling the level of the input to your amplifier, even though they may be miles apart.

 

That's just it, the modulation wouldn't drop, the amplitude would. I can see this conversation leading to a night in with Google!

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I used to have a really good wireless system and didnt get much signal degrigation, it was a really expensive one that I got cheap from a friend who worked at a guitar shop.. I was really proud of it and loved it but only managed to use it twice before it got stolen at a gig :(

 

( I never left anything lying about after that I can tell you ).

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First time I tried one was 81 or so, I remember using a Rico* guitar into some kinda Dean Markley amp I think, and walking around outside the store. It was cool, it was an early attempt by Nady to give working guitar players wireless, and it really did suck the chunks it blew.

 

I've used them on and off. More than guitars, more than amps, more than any other stuff in yer music room, two words are true about wireless: Spend Money. The cheap ones are dreadful, the good ones are good.

 

The channels are because lots of folks share those frequencies and you could conceivably have your whole band bleeding into each others wireless, or worse, all of you into one. And fire trucks. Taxi cabs. That creepy guy lives next door to the bar with the 17 ham radios. That stuff. So we used to have all those problems until they went...VHF?

Something like that, and then we got channels, and we could be independant of every one around us.

 

Tone suck is up to the listener. Nobody in a bar gives a ratsa ss about yer crummy tone anyway. I never had a problem with tone suckage, but then, I've never had some great tone to protect either.

 

rct

 

*Earliest attempt at importing cheaper BCRich. These were great guitars and I shoulda bought a few of them, they were very short lived. If you run into one in decent shape, buy it.

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Only top shelf wireless systems will give you the fidelity of a cable connection and furthermore using it only in the house is a bit of an unnecessary expense your money would be much better spent investing in some high quality cables or some stomp boxes you've been lusting over.

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I use X2s wireless and I think it is wonderful. No dropping, no tone changes and its small/compact to fit on your board. At this point though I believe LIne 6 bought them... I think they are called relay units now.

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I've used a Carvin UHF system for about 2-3 yrs, 16 channels all clear and not the first problem. Two aa batteries for transmiter last about 3 weeks. Have two transmiters on the same channel so I can switch guitars quickly and quietly. love to be mo-bile.

TC

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