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gotomsdos

Martin or Gibson, who owns more 40+ aged players ?

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I just lauched a thread of the numbers of players of 3 big acoustic brands (Martin, Gibson and Taylor). Statistics roughly shows that Gibson is the least.

And more, in my impression of Gibson's quality reputation, 1965 through 1986 seems like bad era for Gibson, because of its manager out of guitar door. Bad (or not good) quality starts from then, so maybe the sales went down until 1986 especially 1989 when acoustic moved to Montana. Since then quality reputation seemed to be recovering, but it will not give rise to a quick sales rise, needs to wait...Coz seems more buyers are in Taylor' room, especially young folks.

 

But I guess Taylor maybe owns the biggest number of young folks.

So What about player's age ?

Now what I'm interested in is

any statistics of numbers of middle aged (40+) and elderly players of Martin and Gibson (with guitar at 2K+, or US made)?

Or anydoby who did a poll or the like ?

 

Why I point out 40+ is I guess 40+ folks have more feeling of US music tradition, more or less.

Why I point out 2K+, or US made is I guess they show out serious or experienced players.

 

Even though it seems like apple or orange. but just curious of the data (for reference only). Seems like a question like Democratic or Republican, who has more supporters ?

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Way past 40! I play Martins for a while then pick up a Gibson. Play the Gibson for a while then pick up a Martin. Play it for a while......

 

It's a vicious circle, but what fun! What's a Taylor?

 

Willy

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Way past 40! I play Martins for a while then pick up a Gibson. Play the Gibson for a while then pick up a Martin. Play it for a while......

 

It's a vicious circle, but what fun! What's a Taylor?

 

Willy

Holy crap! I could have written this. But you did it first.

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I read once on the AGF where a poster descried the difference from sociographic rather than demogrphic point of view.

 

And it goes like this:

 

Taylor: Choir Boys

Martin Ol' Boys

Gibson Bad Boys

 

Somethin' in that I believe. Not saying all Gibson playin' boys n girls are bad, but there is a wicked sense of humour and touch of the mischevious I reckon ..

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I read once on the AGF where a poster descried the difference from sociographic rather than demogrphic point of view.

 

And it goes like this:

 

Taylor: Choir Boys

Martin Ol' Boys

Gibson Bad Boys

 

Somethin' in that I believe. Not saying all Gibson playin' boys n girls are bad, but there is a wicked sense of humour and touch of the mischevious I reckon ..

 

Yeap we're bad to the bone, or tusk!

 

[thumbup]

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I read once on the AGF where a poster descried the difference from sociographic rather than demogrphic point of view.

 

And it goes like this:

 

Taylor: Choir Boys

Martin Ol' Boys

Gibson Bad Boys

 

Somethin' in that I believe. Not saying all Gibson playin' boys n girls are bad, but there is a wicked sense of humour and touch of the mischevious I reckon ..

 

 

I guess that would make people like me "Bad Ol' Boys".

 

Certainly ain't no choir boy.

 

And I'm WAY past 40! Like, decades. [biggrin]

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Way past 40! I play Martins for a while then pick up a Gibson. Play the Gibson for a while then pick up a Martin. Play it for a while......

 

It's a vicious circle, but what fun! What's a Taylor?

 

Willy

 

With acoustics, this is where I'm at too. For whatever reason, I don't associate Taylor with any particular type of music or sound. Not slamming here, just a comment. And not to embarrass EA, I thought a comment he made a while back was interesting and more or less sums up where I'm at -

 

Its human nature to want to categorise and compartmentalise things, also with guitars and styles. Hence you have ..

 

Martin: Bluegrass

 

Gibson: Blues, Country

 

Taylor: Sensitive metrosexual type, thingie music

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Under 40 here, playing a Gibson only. Recent convert after playing an early 90's Taylor dread for the last 18 years.

 

Re: Taylor, I sometimes play in a worship band, and I have to say, I see a TON of Taylors at churches. I don't want to play into the stereotype, but it's true in my experience. My three best explanations are (1) neck is easy to play up, and they have lots of cutaways, so for people playing lots of basic chords (which you typically do when leading others in singing) it is nice to be able to mix things up with barre chords up the neck, (2) they have some relatively affordable all-solid wood models with nice features, and most folks getting paid to lead worship in a church aren't exactly rolling in cash, and (3) they have a clean, sparkly sound, which to me is vaguely consistent with the clean, sparkly sound you hear in a lot of the over-produced, Nashvilly contemporary Christian music out there.

 

Of the 3 explanations above, only (3) is a negative (and that one is only negative to me, not necessarily to others). I reached the point where I preferred the sound of a Gibson over the sound of the Taylor, but they make some lovely guitars.

 

I also have to say that their customer service is (or at least was) top-notch. I was building an acoustic about 15 years ago, and wanted to do a Taylor-style bolt-on neck. I called them up to ask them what size bolts and hardware they use, half expecting them to say "none of your business!" Instead, they offered to just send me (gratis) a few screws that I could use on my homemade axe.

 

Just realized I've rambled off topic, but that took me like 15 minutes to write, so no way I'm erasing it now! [blush]

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You're calling me elderly ?? LOL watch out or I'll hit you with my hearing aid [flapper]

 

I've got multiple plus $2000 Gibsons and multiple plus $2000 Martins in the fold.

 

I have no interest in Taylors or any other guitar brand, boutique or otherwise, call me an old fogey but no other guitar manufacturer comes close to giving me the classic sound and that classic mojo that I strive for.

 

You young fogeys probably don't know much about classic or mojo because anyone born after 1962 don't have any [flapper]

 

Highly opinionated opinions from an highly opinionated Martin Gibson acoustic guitar owner.

 

Harmonics101

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You young fogeys probably don't know much about classic or mojo because anyone born after 1962 don't have any [flapper]

 

Highly opinionated opinions from an highly opinionated Martin Gibson acoustic guitar owner.

 

Harmonics101

 

 

Hmmmmm, I was going to suggest earlier than 1962 as the cut-off date...... [biggrin]

 

Actually, 1962 seems a pretty good cut-off. That was the year of Dylan't first album, and the first records released by the Beatles. The earth was just beginning to shake....

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Age 60 here. I own 5 gibsons, 4 of them over $2k. I do not bond with Martins, I like their sound but find the necks way too uncomfortable.

I am really not a fan of long scale rosewood guitars. I have two Taylors but well under $2k in price and I like em both. Still have my Martin 12 string, I like the width of the fretboard.

 

For what its worth (zero) I prefer Gibson Acoustics and Fender Electrics, but my LPs and PRS guitars are a very very close second.

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Having past 60 years of age I love Gibsons and Martins. These days I own two Gibsons (both old and both worth well over $2K) and no Martins. But my first guitar was actually a Martin - a 1930s R-18 archtop a friend of the family had sitting in a closet and which they gave me for my birthday.

 

In terms of what I have bought myself though, I go way back with Gibson.

I have to be honest here, the reason my first "good" guitar paid for with my own money was a Gibson rather than a Martin had nothing to do with sound and everything to do with the fact that I stumbled across a Gibson I could afford first (a 1930s L-00). I did not buy my first Martin (a used D-18) until years later.

 

I would think though alot of geezers would have taken to Martins because of their association with the fok music revival of the early 1960s. It was the guitar I recall everybody wanting. About the only guy I can think of who was really associated with Gibson would have been Bob Dylan. You also had the burgeoning Guild crowd inspired by guys like Dave Van Ronk and Josh White

 

Not sure I buy this bad boy thing (at least not when compared to maybe National or Stella which were played by some real bad boys like Son House and Leadbelly) but I think some part of what appealed to me about Gibson was a reverse snob thing. They seemed to be more of a proletarian guitar than Martin which seemed kinda elitist. But in then end I guess old school Gibson tone just worked for me because I have stayed with them. It does not mean I will never own a Martin again just that if I have the scratch and have a choice I am more likely to snag another Gibson.

 

Taylor - nothin' but girlie guitars.

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You young fogeys probably don't know much about classic or mojo because anyone born after 1962 don't have any [flapper]

 

 

I would put that at least a decade earlier. I would say you had t be at least old enough to strat drooling for an electric guitar after seeing the Batles on Sullivam. What did folks born in the later 1950s or early 1960s give the world - Disco?

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With acoustics, this is where I'm at too. For whatever reason, I don't associate Taylor with any particular type of music or sound. Not slamming here, just a comment. And not to embarrass EA, I thought a comment he made a while back was interesting and more or less sums up where I'm at

I associate Taylor with modern praise and worship music. They have done a good job of securing the church crowd. It seems that the younger generation likes the bright, dare I say sterile, sound so commonly associated with their guitars. I think Taylor makes a pretty guitar and a consistent guitar, but not unlike the younger generation that favors them, their voice lacks character.

 

FWIW I am over 40 and there is just something about my Gibsons that just feel right. I can't say for sure wheter it is the low end thump of the bass, or the throaty characteristic of the mids, or the clear highs that aren't overly bright, but my AJ grabs me and won't let me go. I think I like its versatility most of all. It can be loud and in your face and at the same time responsive to the lightest touch. I seems that the Gibson tonal characteristics that draw the most criticism from non-Gibson people, are what I like best about them. Bottom line is, I like a little "dirty" tone in my guitars.

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Well into my 50's and I have to admit to owning 3 Taylors, as well as 3 Martins and 2 Gibsons. I play them all and enjoy what each one has to offer.

 

Now take what follows as just the observation of some ol' 50 something guy who likes having friends (about the same age) over for some good food, a few beers and playing music. If I had to pick a favorite it would be the M-36 Martin......when friends drop by it's usually their favorite too and they always want to play it and few want to put it down. My J-100 is the one that everyone wants to try and they all comment on it's great tone, but most people don't play it for very long because of it's size. The Taylors are always the ones that surprise folks the most for the way they play and the tone. A typical comment goes something like....."wow, this guitar is so clean sounding". This is especially true when people play the 814ce. They are also the most comfortable to play over a long evening. When just one guitar is being played, the J-45 is very popular, plus it's the coolest looking guitar of the bunch. When we play together, the Gibsons tend to go back into their cases and the Martins and Taylors are played because they sound darned good together. Last Christmas when our kids who are in their 20's were home for the holidays and could join the fun, they grabbed the Fenders in the thin cases!!

 

Visiting guitars include Takamine, Yamaha, Larrivee and Ovation and good friendship and music comes out of every one of them.

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everyone makes sense hear , no doubt about that , but i think a HUGE amount of influencing our choice of what guitar to buy is what the people we love to listen to play . maybe i'm just easily led but if you check out the performances on this forum there aint an awful lot of foo fighters covers

you cant slate someone who wants a taylor because what he/she's listening to will be what they want to sound like

i'm not saying i'm trying to sound like bruce springsteen because he plays a gibson so if i get one i'll sound like him.(though when i was 16 j might have believed that!) but its my type of music .

i'm sure there was a sudden boost in old stellas and kay guitars when the white stripes became popular and theres been interest in that red white and blue thing that ryan adams has been using. ..buck owens guitar ! just came to me!

and while oasis / pearl jam were using takamines for mtv unplugged , people were investigating them. i can see patterns here . peer pressure / emulation has a big factor

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everyone makes sense hear , no doubt about that , but i think a HUGE amount of influencing our choice of what guitar to buy is what the people we love to listen to play . maybe i'm just easily led but if you check out the performances on this forum there aint an awful lot of foo fighters covers

you cant slate someone who wants a taylor because what he/she's listening to will be what they want to sound like

i'm not saying i'm trying to sound like bruce springsteen because he plays a gibson so if i get one i'll sound like him.(though when i was 16 j might have believed that!) but its my type of music .

i'm sure there was a sudden boost in old stellas and kay guitars when the white stripes became popular and theres been interest in that red white and blue thing that ryan adams has been using. ..buck owens guitar ! just came to me!

and while oasis / pearl jam were using takamines for mtv unplugged , people were investigating them. i can see patterns here . peer pressure / emulation has a big factor

 

Yup.

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I was playing a Martin D28 in the early 90's and fell in love with a J200 in a shop. When I saw the price I vaporlocked. Wow, how will I ever afford a guitar like that? Later in early 06' I was playing a SJ300 in a shop. I was supposed to be helping my wife find a fiddle. I don't know much about fiddles so I noodled and the salesman helped her. She said" just buy it" and I did. This was my first Gibson, and I have found the sound I have been looking for. My friend says that it is interesting to note what type of guitars, singers play. That they seem to play ones that go with their voices. (He does not play by the way.)

 

Another interesting note. I play occasionally with two guys who are Taylor devotees. Nice guitars, however not for me. They tell me "You are a cowboy and you are supposed to play a big old Gibson." There might be something to the "type casting."

 

FYI. I have had Takamine as well, they are nice enough. But I just can't get past the super jumbo. She just plain fits...

 

Oh, sorry, I didn't make your cut. 1963. :(

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Under 40 here, playing a Gibson only. Recent convert after playing an early 90's Taylor dread for the last 18 years.

 

Re: Taylor, I sometimes play in a worship band, and I have to say, I see a TON of Taylors at churches. I don't want to play into the stereotype, but it's true in my experience. My three best explanations are (1) neck is easy to play up, and they have lots of cutaways, so for people playing lots of basic chords (which you typically do when leading others in singing) it is nice to be able to mix things up with barre chords up the neck, (2) they have some relatively affordable all-solid wood models with nice features, and most folks getting paid to lead worship in a church aren't exactly rolling in cash, and (3) they have a clean, sparkly sound, which to me is vaguely consistent with the clean, sparkly sound you hear in a lot of the over-produced, Nashvilly contemporary Christian music out there.

 

 

Similar at my church too. Mainly Lowden with a few Avalon's and Taylor's - not one Gibson or Martin. My friend has an HD-28 that I like and the tone suits him very well. However, while they've all got their own good points, none of them grab me like a Gibson. There's no other brand that I GAS after. I'm delighted to own one now and look forward to growin old with it. I now aspire to own a Hummingbird at some stage.

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