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new nut is on my work bench


upsidedown club

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UDC,

Brad is right...That is a good price.

How about putting up a link to where you got it. I need to pick up a couple.

 

Well, Good Luck!

Practice makes perfect. (Man, do I have a long way to go)

 

So...

Nuts to you and let us know how this one works out.

Pics would be cool, too.

 

Willy

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6060 epi nut I got mine for $6.95 plus , he may vary his prices or maybe he has gone up a little, anyways bought both from this guy. super fast shipping..ok pics and other stuff as it goes.. got the nut off again and checking the fretboard for level, so now my home made fret file is going into action.. this could really turn into a cluster .... but Im pumped I see why my was less, I bought black ones he has both
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WP_000298.jpgWP_000296.jpgWP_000295.jpg

i actually need a new nut for my dot but i always mess em up. [thumbdn] wish i could get one that doesnt need any tweaking just perfectly shaped

the 6060 is pre cut so it helps, dry fit and restring , then .... tweak.. The thing we need to get is the fact that every git is a little different. the neck can bow one way or the other the frets can be uneven the bridge height... so we have to press on and make our mistakes and understand it all together.I just finished my first fret leveling ever , and it seemed to go good.. reoiled the board to darken it up and its always seemed dry lookingWP_000301.jpg

 

 

WP_000300.jpg

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You were smart to leave the strings on. That way you can check out the action and other stuff when working on getting it to fit properly. And then when you glue it in, you can put the strings back on and they will put pressure to hold down the nut good.

I also believe I see the edge of Dan Erlewine's Guitar Player Repair Guide in one pic.

That too is smart to have! [biggrin]

 

Nice pics! [thumbup]

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You were smart to leave the strings on. That way you can check out the action and other stuff when working on getting it to fit properly. And then when you glue it in, you can put the strings back on and they will put pressure to hold down the nut good.

I also believe I see the edge of Dan Erlewine's Guitar Player Repair Guide in one pic.

That too is smart to have! [biggrin]

 

Nice pics! [thumbup] thanks , yeah that book... that was a lesson by itself... because I filed down the nut to real close to his beloved special low specs... wont do that again... btw brad hope you find a good job sooner than latter.. been reading a lot of posts..also where is RasTUs today..

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Good luck... May the force be with you ! ... and if the force isn't working, switch it off at the wall and back on again [biggrin]

 

yea, I left the stings on on all my geets that got the bone treatment, it is just so easy to string it up and make small adjustments....once the nut is sorted, then pop on a new set and do the intonation.

 

 

 

P.S good pics [thumbup]

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Good luck... May the force be with you ! ... and if the force isn't working, switch it off at the wall and back on again [biggrin]

 

yea, I left the stings on on all my geets that got the bone treatment, it is just so easy to string it up and make small adjustments....once the nut is sorted, then pop on a new set and do the intonation.

 

 

 

P.S good pics [thumbup] thanks bigneil.. that earworm thread is a good read.. and listen wonder what song your humming??LOL was hoping for some cudo's for the using the levels for fret filing...sigh...maybe most people figured that out already for themselves...

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yea the levels is a quite a good idea, but really you are supposed to use a radius block so that you maintain curvature of the fretboard properly....as long as you are gentle and careful it should work for fine adjustments.....I have even used a large sharpening stone before [unsure], it worked but I wouldn't recommend it to others.

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The various Epiphone models with the standard tailpiece and studs make it easy to put the strings aside while working on the guitars.

After winding the tuners back to slacken the strings, I'll use a penny to unscrew the studs (the penny won't damage the slots like a steel screwdriver might).. then I wrap the tailpiece in a paper towel or soft cloth and secure it with a rubber band to prevent accidental contact with the guitar finish.

 

I believe checking the frets with a couple of small straight edges, or a fret rocker tool, is a good preliminary step prior to installing a new nut. If high spots on the frets are present, the results of installing a new nut may be very disappointing.

 

When replacing nuts, with the strings aside, the existing nut can be removed and the trial fit of the new nut started. I have a piece of dowel rod I place under the loosened strings above the 1st fret, to hold the strings high enough (with the tailpiece installed and strings slack) to be able to remove and replace the new nut for adjusting it's height, then putting it back in the neck slot and removing the dowel so the strings can be re-tensioned for a final check of the fit of the new nut.

After the new nut is adjusted for a good installed height (and ends trimmed), it's glued in place and the strings can be tuned.

 

Bill

 

 

You were smart to leave the strings on. That way you can check out the action and other stuff when working on getting it to fit properly. And then when you glue it in, you can put the strings back on and they will put pressure to hold down the nut good.

I also believe I see the edge of Dan Erlewine's Guitar Player Repair Guide in one pic.

That too is smart to have! [biggrin]

 

Nice pics! [thumbup]

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so now when I fret across to barre chord I get a dead note because I cant push hard enough .I think I ruined my frets not enough height left anyway didnt glue or file the nut yet I am slipping the bone nut back under the strings and that should tell me for sure whether the frets are toasted[cursing] [thumbdn]WP_000302.jpg

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so now when I fret across to barre chord I get a dead note because I cant push hard enough .I think I ruined my frets not enough height left anyway didnt glue or file the nut yet I am slipping the bone nut back under the strings and that should tell me for sure whether the frets are toasted[cursing] [thumbdn]WP_000302.jpg

 

 

I need more information to give you a hand. I've done quite a few complete fret levels in my small guitar repair business.

I use an Aluminum Radius Sanding Block, from stewmac, and Stik It sandpaper.

This maintains the correct radius and is long enough to get a nice fret level job done.

 

The 1st thing I do before ever touching the frets is make sure the fingerboard is absolutely straight, using the truss rod, and checking with a Notched Straightedge.

 

Second is to check the frets with a straightedge, and a Fret Rocker, to see if any are high or low.

 

If I find that only one or two frets are high, I check to see if the frets have simply gotten a bit loose in the slot. If they are loose and have worked their way up in the slot, I clamp them down and re-glue. If not, I use a small file and file those frets down, and re-crown them.

 

If the level is all over the place then it is time to go for the whole thing, using an 18 inch long radiused sanding block. Then a complete re-crown.

 

Fourth is making sure there is a bit of "Fallaway". That, is tapering the frets from the body joint to the base of the neck down from .001 at the body, to .006 at the base.

 

There is a thread with pics I did on this topic in the DIY thread at the top of the Lounge.

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thanks , after a overall sanding to get rid of a buzzing on the lower strings and ,in my view to aid in lowering the action to the best posible. its seems like when I barre the lower strings wont ring just muted out. unless I press harder than before to add to the confusion,,, my nut is new and not filed to a low enough setting yet.. so ! 1. maybe when I lower the nut height this glitch will solve it self 2. maybe I took too much off my frets and now they wont work really good for the shape of my hands and fingers. Trying to learn a lot too fast maybe and kinda reckless I always was. but I will put new frets on this thing if I have to .. seems like my finger and hand size would like jumbo frets

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If you have a set of feeler guages, and a small straightedge [a small ruler will do] lay the ruler across the frets and use the feelers to measure the height of the frets off of the fingerboad.

 

A new fret, classed as a Med. Jumbo, will measure out anywhere from approx. 35 - 45 thousands high.

 

You can file these down to about 25 thousands before they will feel too low.

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I saw a video of Merle Haggard, made within the last several years, and I think the frets on his guitar would be in a category of Mega Jumbo maybe.. they looked huge (not quite the size of 1950s Buick bumpers, but very big).

 

Bill

 

If you have a set of feeler guages, and a small straightedge [a small ruler will do] lay the ruler across the frets and use the feelers to measure the height of the frets off of the fingerboad.

A new fret, classed as a Med. Jumbo, will measure out anywhere from approx. 35 - 45 thousands high.

You can file these down to about 25 thousands before they will feel too low.

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If you have a set of feeler guages, and a small straightedge [a small ruler will do] lay the ruler across the frets and use the feelers to measure the height of the frets off of the fingerboad.

 

A new fret, classed as a Med. Jumbo, will measure out anywhere from approx. 35 - 45 thousands high.

 

You can file these down to about 25 thousands before they will feel too low.

 

well after reading your post I recrowned the frets to get rid of the flatness on some and that really helped.. I got lucky still enought fret height ,but the hand sanding of each fret takes pains, messy too but I can relax now about the frets and move back to the nut and action setup.. thanks again yeah jumbo or xtra jumbo frets.. seemed nice on another git I was goofing with the other day.. wonder how many people care about fret height and wish the had taller ones on their epi? [biggrin]

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well after reading your post I recrowned the frets to get rid of the flatness on some and that really helped.. I got lucky still enought fret height ,but the hand sanding of each fret takes pains, messy too but I can relax now about the frets and move back to the nut and action setup.. thanks again yeah jumbo or xtra jumbo frets.. seemed nice on another git I was goofing with the other day.. wonder how many people care about fret height and wish the had taller ones on their epi? [biggrin]

 

 

Great news on the fret height! A complete re-fret is an expensive repair. In the 400 area.

A complete fret level is a 150 dollar job in my shop. Now you're finding out why. I splurged on a diamond crowning file. 98 bucks plus shipping, but a great tool.

 

Yes. The top of the fret has to be rounded. A flat top on a fret will cause bad notes, as well as being difficult to bend, because the string is sitting on too large a surface.

 

When filing the slots on the nut, simply loosen one string at a time, and work on that slot. Go slow and easy, it's easy to file too much off, as you've unfortunately found out. Especially on the small slots. The sharper files cut more quickly.

 

Use your feelers again to measure the height from the top of the 1st fret, to the bottom of the string, when in tune.

 

Factory Specs are a bit too high for my liking. Dan Erliwine's are a bit too low.

I typically set up to these heights at the 1st fret, on an electric guitar.

 

Bass E = .025

A = .022

D = .020

G = .018

B = .016

Treb E = .013

 

As to fret heights, that is a feel thing. Different for everyone. Too high with too strong a grip, and you pull the notes sharp. Too low makes it tougher to bend notes.

I've tried a number of sizes and for me, even though you can get frets that are .050 or more, .045 is too high. .035 is just right for me. [biggrin]

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Great news on the fret height! A complete re-fret is an expensive repair.

 

Yep. the top of the fret has to be rounded. A flat top on a fret will cause bad notes, as well as being difficult to bend, because the string is sitting on too large a surface.

 

When filing the slots on the nut, simply loosen one string at a time, and work on that slot. Go slow and easy, it's easy to file too much off, as you've unfortunately found out. Especially on the small slots. The sharper files cut more quickly.

 

Use your feelers again to measure the height from the top of the 1st fret, to the bottom of the string, when in tune.

 

Factory Specs are a bit too high for my liking. Dan Erliwine's are a bit too low.

I typically set up to these heights at the 1st fret.

 

Bass E = .025

A = .022

D = .020

G = .018

B = .016

Treb E = .013

 

ok cool thanks

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