Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Recommended Posts

Really annoying buzz coming from open D and G. The neck seems to be straight...maybe a slight bow to it. It's impossible to strum with any force ...theres so much buzz it sounds thin and tinny. I do have a Colosi saddle i installed myself almost a year ago. The height matches the stock tusq saddle, however, and it was fine until now. I guess the change in weather here in ny has alot to do with it. In any case, what's the proper course of action? Is it to raise the saddle, or raise the nut? If the saddle gets raised, does it mess with the piezo?.......I will bring it to a luthier, I was just curious as to the probable cause and solution. THANKS!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the open tunings myself, esp. D and G. I use John Pearse mediums because I de-tune quite a bit ... 13 - 56. Don't know if changing to a heavier string will take some of the "loosy-goosy" out of the string set or not. Maybe someone else has some ideas. Hope you can get 'er figured out. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Really annoying buzz coming from open D and G. The neck seems to be straight...maybe a slight bow to it. It's impossible to strum with any force ...theres so much buzz it sounds thin and tinny. I do have a Colosi saddle i installed myself almost a year ago. The height matches the stock tusq saddle, however, and it was fine until now. I guess the change in weather here in ny has alot to do with it. In any case, what's the proper course of action? Is it to raise the saddle, or raise the nut? If the saddle gets raised, does it mess with the piezo?.......I will bring it to a luthier, I was just curious as to the probable cause and solution. THANKS!

Do you have a string height gauge? Can you easily slide a 70mm guitar pick under those two strings on top of the first fret? Perhaps you could turn the truss rod an eighth of a turn counter-clockwise- probably no more - I take it that the G and D strings do not buzz when fretted, even at the first fret - but when strummed on the opened position, it sounds like they are ever so slightly vibrating agains that first fret - and the neck needs just a touch more relief. I am not a luthier - just a player who finds that an ever so slight tweak here and there are necessary from time to time, and I don't have a luthier nearby. The truss rod nut on my Gibson J-45 is not readily adjusted with an ordinary socket wrench, I had to get a nut driver (5/16)- and not one of those little short ones - they don't have the torque you need - mine is about 10 inches long. Don't strip that truss rod nut ! If you aren't comfortable tackling this, then a trip to your luthier is probably needed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

my D and G strings buzz open also, but I dont think its fret buzz..I think on mine the saddle is causing the buzz. since you changed the saddle on yours, try going back to the original saddle, and see if that fixes the problem

Link to post
Share on other sites

.....and it was fine until now.

 

There's the rub. If it was fine after installation of the new saddle and the rattle is a new occurence, it must be a change in neck relief.......though it does seem that such a change would likely cause rattle in other strings as well. You did not say if there is rattle when the strings are fretted - is there?

Link to post
Share on other sites

You did not say if there is rattle when the strings are fretted - is there?

Good question. Are the strings buzzing when fretted or not? If not, then you have to try and determine where the buzz is coming from - frets, nut, saddle, etc. and take it from there. If they do buzz when fretted, then it's probably a string height issue. If the problem started when you switched nuts, then maybe the nut slots are too deep for those strings and the string height at the first few frets is too low. You have to have a decent metric steel ruler. The high E should be .5mm at the 1st fret - low E @ .75mm with middle strings graduating in height bewteen the two.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question. Are the strings buzzing when fretted or not? If not, then you have to try and determine where the buzz is coming from - frets, nut, saddle, etc. and take it from there. If they do buzz when fretted, then it's probably a string height issue. If the problem started when you switched nuts, then maybe the nut slots are too deep for those strings and the string height at the first few frets is too low. You have to have a decent metric steel ruler. The high E should be .5mm at the 1st fret - low E @ .75mm with middle strings graduating in height bewteen the two.

 

+1

 

 

.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it was fine until now it is likely that something has recently changed or has been changing slowly to cause this to happen. My guess is that the guitar has dried out a bit and the top has dropped causing the buzz. IMHO it is a hydration issue. If you cand humidify the guitar the top will likely come back up and back to normal soon. Just a possibility.

JM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for all of the info. The string action gauge will definitely be ordered. The strings are buzzing when open....not fretted. I think the humidity issue is one i should look into. Never thought of that. Don't know that the oasis humidifier I got last year did the trick this year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for all of the info. The string action gauge will definitely be ordered. The strings are buzzing when open....not fretted. I think the humidity issue is one i should look into. Never thought of that. Don't know that the oasis humidifier I got last year did the trick this year.

 

Hi, this is my first posting on the acoustic forum but thought I might be able to pass along my own experience.

I had the exact same thing happen with my Taylor acoustic and Guild 12 string over the winter.

Living in the Ottawa, Canada area, it gets very dry in winter and humid in summer. A challenge for guitars.

I was well aware of humidity issues so bought a room humidifier. The building that I keep my guitars and other equipment in is heated with electricity and a wood stove. The wood stove was left unattended for a length of time and heated the building up to over 110f for an extended period with humidity around 20 percent. The small room humidifier could not keep up.

End result: Acoustic guitars screwed up.

Bought a large multi-room humidifier, put humidipaks in the soundhole of each guitar and left them alone for about a week. Came back perfect. No adjustments required.

Sorry for the long winded response.

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, this is my first posting on the acoustic forum but thought I might be able to pass along my own experience.

I had the exact same thing happen with my Taylor acoustic and Guild 12 string over the winter.

Living in the Ottawa, Canada area, it gets very dry in winter and humid in summer. A challenge for guitars.

I was well aware of humidity issues so bought a room humidifier. The building that I keep my guitars and other equipment in is heated with electricity and a wood stove. The wood stove was left unattended for a length of time and heated the building up to over 110f for an extended period with humidity around 20 percent. The small room humidifier could not keep up.

End result: Acoustic guitars screwed up.

Bought a large multi-room humidifier, put humidipaks in the soundhole of each guitar and left them alone for about a week. Came back perfect. No adjustments required.

Sorry for the long winded response.

Dave

 

Yes, I was just going to post that the "I've got a buzz" threads start popping up every springtime it seems, when the weather changes. Wooden doors stick and guitars do funny things

Link to post
Share on other sites

The strings are buzzing when open....not fretted.

 

That indicates a problem with the nut on the G and B strings. When you fret the string the only component removed from the equation is the nut. If the strings do not rattle when fretted, only open, they are too low in the nut.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1332880197[/url]' post='1162230']

That indicates a problem with the nut on the G and B strings. When you fret the string the only component removed from the equation is the nut. If the strings do not rattle when fretted, only open, they are too low in the nut.

 

Thanks, Buc. i assume it's an easy, not too expensive fix. it's not a DIY?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its DIY, if you can slot and install a new nut. Otherwise, take to the repairman....should be way less than $100. I do my own setups and have made nuts. It is tedious and requires a hundred dollars or so of the right tools. Certainly not worth the investment unless you are doing more than one... [wink]

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can test the diagnosis by putting a piece of paper under the offending strings in the nut slots. If the rattle ceases......voila! I used to do this early in my playing career when I strung a right handed guitar lefty - the low E and A nut slots were often too deep for the high E and B when reverse strung. Rod is right.....without the right tools it's not easy to correct a too deeply cut nut. Take it to the shop if the paper trick confirms the problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody have experience with a klink sound in the B string. I bought a set of .013 nut files from StewMac hoping that would nip the klink. I've used the paper method Buc mentioned which is a good way to find fret buzz, saddle's good, dunno. Klink is like a mosquito buzzin around the ear just can't find that little sucker. best wishes on your fret buzz Michaelr

Link to post
Share on other sites
1332886964[/url]' post='1162352']

You can test the diagnosis by putting a piece of paper under the offending strings in the nut slots. If the rattle ceases......voila! I used to do this early in my playing career when I strung a right handed guitar lefty - the low E and A nut slots were often too deep for the high E and B when reverse strung. Rod is right.....without the right tools it's not easy to correct a too deeply cut nut. Take it to the shop if the paper trick confirms the problem.

 

Voila! The paper did the trick and temporarily I have "the sound" back. So it is the nut and I appreciate your patience and advice for an issue that seasoned guitarists can probably diagnose in an instant.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I would take it to a luthier to replace the nut

 

But if you fancy a quick fix yourself, then drop baking soda in the slot, drop in some cyanoacrylate glue (super glue), then file to depth and shape. Mask off the guitar to be sure of not getting the glue where it is not required or causing damage.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks MG,

I had considered using the cy glue but had not heard of the baking soda thing, sounds like a good idea. The luthier I've been using built a new saddle, setup, etc but he didn't notice the klink. His work is good but I would like to tinker on this one a little for future diy reference. I know this is a simple fix but didn't want to get a science experiment going if someone else had an clue, thanks again.

MichaelR, hope you don't mind my cutting in but the two things are so closely related is my excuse.

Link to post
Share on other sites

before you raid your mum's larder , have a look on the stewmac site . they are selling bone nuts ready to go . for martin ir gibson , just stick one in . contact them wjth your guitar details . you might have to sand a bit off the bottom , but thats not hard.

think they're going for 14 or 15 dollars

Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem, Tarrr. I'm very relieved to have ID'ed the problem with the help of Buc, but this time i'm giong to a pro to have it fixed. There is a good vid on You Tube by fretmdvideo showing how to replace a nut, but id never attemp it without the tools and a junk guitar to practice on. hope you find the mystery buzz....my SWD sounds soo sweet now

Link to post
Share on other sites

The quick fixes of 'field expedients' are a good way to diagnose a nut problem. Puting paper, match sticks, baking soda and super glue in the nut slots to raise the slot is a good way to determine if the nut is the problem. You can always remove the fix if that doesn't fix the problem.

 

But the best long-term fix is a new nut.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...