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Motherofpearl

Beautiful fretboard

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I was changing the strings on my hummingbird tonight and cleaning the fretboard it's gotta be one of the nicest I've seen I'll share and if you got one to see share yours!!

 

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Who actually knows what lurks behind that F-board binding..... [scared]

 

Might have been an idea to limit the multi-piece fretboards to models that were going to be bound...

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Might have been an idea to limit the multi-piece fretboards to models that were going to be bound...

 

do you know i was thinking that while the other thread was happening , but i wouldnt worry what was behind that example above . very nice

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Wow! What did you clean it with? Also, anyone know if virtuoso cleaner will be ok on bare wood?

 

No! Don't even think of it. Use a hydrating oil formulated for fretboards, if it's a board you are talking about. Explain the situation, and we'll try to figure out what you need.

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Indeed a beautiful cut of rosewood! I am, however, horrified to see you are string post knot kinda guy! [flapper]

 

Buc, I see what you're talking about at the string post, but can't quite figure it out. If he's doing what I'm thinking it looks like, I don't quite get it, as it doesn't apply proper downward pressure on the string wraps at the post.

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Yes. The string is near the top of the post, limiting the down pressure over the nut which, in the extreme, could contribute to fret rattle on open strings. But as much as that, I was noting that the strings appear knotted to the post as opposed to wrapped. No offense, MOP, of course.

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Buc, I see what you're talking about at the string post, but can't quite figure it out. If he's doing what I'm thinking it looks like, I don't quite get it, as it doesn't apply proper downward pressure on the string wraps at the post.

 

My ol' eyes won't quite let me see what ya'll mean. Are you talking about the technique where one "wind" is below the string and eye and the other above?

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I was changing the strings on my hummingbird tonight and cleaning the fretboard it's gotta be one of the nicest I've seen I'll share and if you got one to see share yours!!

 

 

What year is the guitar MOP? Judging by the condition and the Grovers I assume she must be a recent model. But not recent enough to have laminated wood I guess....

 

:huh:

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Here, IMO, is a properly wound string. First wrap over the hole, the rest below. No need to tie any kind of knot around the post, but I do understand that everyone has their own ways of doing this......

 

j45headstock.JPG

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Thanks buc! I screwed up on the low e and it looks terrible I was always told first wrap over the rest under is this not correct? Spot this hummingbird is a 2010 modern classic. My favorite guitar! But please if I'm stringing it wrong let me know I'm curious I've always wondered if I'm screwing it up lol! By the way whats a knot? Thanks all this fretboard is really something special

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... But please if I'm stringing it wrong let me know I'm curious I've always wondered if I'm screwing it up lol! By the way whats a knot?

 

I hate to plug anything associated with the Tayor brand but this technic really is Fool proof:-

 

Changing Steel Strings

 

[blush]

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Here, IMO, is a properly wound string. First wrap over the hole, the rest below. No need to tie any kind of knot around the post....

 

+1

 

 

Very stable, and a lot easier than a backwards loop and tuck, or a knot.

 

.

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+1

 

 

Very stable, and a lot easier than a backwards loop and tuck, or a knot.

 

 

There's more than one way to skin a cat. Provided it locks the string so that it can't slip, and the final wrap before the string heads towards the nut is on the bottom, it should do the the job.

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I do it all by hand I should buy a tuning tool the odd one looks like s$&@? On the peg but I've never had rattle or buzz issues I'll try that though next time thank you!

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I was always told first wrap over the rest under is this not correct?

 

I suppose there's not a definitive wrong or right on this subject, but all methods should end up with at least 2 or 3 wraps down the post. In doing this you get good angle of break over the nut. The angled headstock of a Gibson cotributes to the break angle a lot regardless of how many post wraps you do. On a straight string pull headstock like a Fender you most definitely need two or more wraps down the post for good angle.

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